Mobile Marketing Isn’t About Devices, It’s About Behavior – thnxz to @annabager


Vía adage.com

Marketers can’t remember this often enough: Mobile is not one screen or two screens. Or three screens (smartphone, tablet, and e-reader). Or four (ultrabook). Or five (phablet). Or six (fill in the blank with whatever connected device consumers will be flocking to next.)

Google Glass? The Apple iWatch? Mobile is a behavior. The only common thread uniting the vast and diverse mobile arena is that consumers are taking a connected device with them on the go. 

By: Anna Bager

(Abstract…)

Some of the most forward-thinking creatives and mobile leaders have begun to answer these questions, creating campaigns and products that demonstrate “liquid creativity,” mobile creative that flows like a liquid across devices and fits flexibly into the distinct opportunities each has available. IAB is featuring these people and their accomplishments  at our June 18 session at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity entitled “Liquid Creativity: Secrets of the Mobile Superstars.”

(…) Full article? + INFO

Responsive design often comes up as an answer to liquid creativity. This is the idea that a web server can recognize the device in which it is supposed to render content, and make adjustments for qualities like screen size. But do we trust computers to make decisions about ad content? Do marketers still want to approve each permutation of an ad? Responsive design can disrupt long-held norms of digital advertising.

(…)

Flexibility is an pportunity. Marketers need to approach mobile not by device, but by their individual objectives. Select the ideal combination of right time, right environment and right consumer, and then incorporate whichever device or devices best serve the intention.

(…) Full article? + INFO

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau).

How Pampers Battled Diaper Debacle

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Around 10 a.m. on May 6, an employee passing by a TV monitor in Procter & Gamble’s Winton Hill complex in Cincinnati noticed a shot of Pampers Cruisers on CNN with the word “Dangerous?

It’s hard to say whether that was the precise moment the flap over the product’s new Dry Max escalated from Facebook flare-up to mainstream-media conflagration. But when the team monitoring and responding to the brand’s growing number of social-media critics got wind of the alert, it seemed as if the mainstream crossover moment they feared had arrived.


The Procter & Gamble Company
Image via Wikipedia

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Around 10 a.m. on May 6, an employee passing by a TV monitor in Procter & Gamble‘s Winton Hill complex in Cincinnati noticed a shot of Pampers Cruisers on CNN with the word “Dangerous?

It’s hard to say whether that was the precise moment the flap over the product’s new Dry Max escalated from Facebook flare-up to mainstream-media conflagration. But when the team monitoring and responding to the brand’s growing number of social-media critics got wind of the alert, it seemed as if the mainstream crossover moment they feared had arrived. Leer más “How Pampers Battled Diaper Debacle”

Doing That Crap Is Going to Cost You

Crappy work can suck the life out of an agency and the money out of a client’s budget.

What is this “crappy work” of which I speak? That’s the hard part — defining it. I have struggled with coming up with a solid definition for crappy work. It isn’t any one type of account or job. Most of us really don’t know if an assignment is crappy until we’re handed the brief or attend a meeting. Generally speaking, we’re talking about assignments with so many restrictions and mandates that there’s no room for anything except to execute the client’s directions — in other words, the agency becomes no more than set of hands. We’re talking assignments where there’s no room for developing an insight or understanding that will deliver for clients the results they want and deserve.


Agencies (and Clients) Pay More for Shoddy Work

Posted by Derek Walker

Derek  Walker
Derek Walker

Paying more doesn’t get a client better work. In reality, crappy work tends to cost both the agency and the client more, a lot more than anyone realizes.

Oops. Uh … Attention all clients!! Please stop reading, and proceed to another post or article. This is insider information — agency eyes only! Please come back next post.

OK now that the clients are gone, let’s talk about one of the greatest lies in advertising — that great work costs more to come up with than crappy work. Leer más “Doing That Crap Is Going to Cost You”

Making an Agency Digital to the Core

Hard to believe, but two years ago people were debating the merits between traditional and digital agencies, as if they had to choose between blue states and red states. Jump ahead to today, and most small agencies have carved out their own path. They have found a way to be true to their roots and have also made huge strides in their commitment to digital marketing. Digital vs. traditional no longer seems like a religious war.


Why Digital Natives Are an Essential Ingredient

Posted by Phil Johnson

Phil  Johnson
Phil Johnson

I continue to be fascinated by how agencies change and how extraordinarily hard this can be to accomplish. Regardless of the difficulty, it’s an essential agency survival skill. Great agencies learn how to continually reinvent themselves to the core, while merely good agencies often only change their outward structure. In some ways this pursuit of change, particularly as agencies define their relevance in the digital world, has been the great advertising drama of the last two years. Leer más “Making an Agency Digital to the Core”

Thanks to Social Media, Direct Marketing Is Going Do-It-Yourself

“People have an innate desire to connect, and while that can mean social media, it also means in person,” said Leslie Poston, founder of the Uptown Uncorked consultancy, which counts independent filmmakers, wine makers and restaurants among its client base. “The interesting thing about a great social-media campaign is it has to have an offline component. The whole point is to get people together.”


How More and More People Are Bypassing Agencies and Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands

By Judann Pollack and Beth Synder Bulik

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Musician Phil Marshall has performed for stadiums of 24,000. Now he’s setting out on a tour where he’ll play for audiences conceivably as small as one.

Phil Marshall wants to play your town.
Phil Marshall wants to play your town.

Mr. Marshall’s “Living Room Concert Series,” in which he’ll bring his act to backyards, lunchrooms, birthday parties — you name it — for a nominal fee is just one in a series of creative do-it-yourself marketing initiatives among entrepreneurs from book authors to murder-mystery theater companies to bring their brands directly into the homes of consumers. Leer más “Thanks to Social Media, Direct Marketing Is Going Do-It-Yourself”

Special Report: 80 Years of Ideas – Advertising Age (2)


Advertising Age: 80 Years of Ideas

Advertising Age: 80 Years of Ideas

We Look at the Events, Brands and Trends That Have Shaped Marketing — and the Ones Still to Come

When Ad Age published its first issue in 1930, the stock market had just tanked, and a Great Depression was only beginning. Consumer spending plunged 41% from 1929 to the Depression’s 1933 nadir. A problem for consumer marketing, media and advertising? Actually, a remarkable opportunity. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Ad Age Video

Covering the Mad Men: Advertising Age at 40

Covering the Mad Men: Advertising Age at 40

Recounting Ad Age’s History in 1970

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Back when Don Draper was swilling Scotch in his corner office, debating how to solve Lucky Strike‘s marketing conundrums, Ad Age was all over in the industry. And it was no young pub — in 1970 the publication was already 40 years old. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

From the Great Depression Through the Great Recession: A Brief  History of Marketing

From the Great Depression Through the Great Recession: A Brief History of Marketing

A Look at 80 Highlights From Ad Age’s First 80 Years, Compiled From Our Archives, Ad Age’s Encyclopedia of Advertising and Additional Research

Ad Age’s Bradley Johnson presents a timeline of marketing, media and ad agencies, showing advertising industry developments from 1930 through 2010. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Back to the Future: Have We Lived Up to Expectations of  Advertising?

Back to the Future: Have We Lived Up to Expectations of Advertising?

From 1977, the Late Biochemist and Science Fiction Legend Isaac Asimov Foretells the Ad Future in 2000

In 1977, Ad Age ran biochemist and science-fiction author Isaac Asimov’s piece forecasting what the advertising “future” would be like in 2000. We’ve reprinted it for our 80th birthday. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

The Cold Truth: No One Does Veggies Quite Like Birds Eye

The Cold Truth: No One Does Veggies Quite Like Birds Eye

Brand’s Identity as a Leader in Frozen Vegetables Stands the Test of Time, and It’s Done So With Little Marketing

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Clarence Birdseye didn’t just invent the commercialized flash-freezing process that kept garden greens tasty and convenient for weeks on end; he built the frozen-food category and its infrastructure, including grocery freezer cases and insulated train cars for their safe transport. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Motorola's Longevity Lies in Its Simple Approach

Motorola’s Longevity Lies in Its Simple Approach

Brand’s Unique Ability to Produce Wide Range of Products Is Secret to Success

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Given it’s been around for 80 years, sells to businesses, governments and consumers and has also historically been best-known for many products it no longer makes, Motorola’s brand continues to offer a surprisingly simple — and enduringly effective — proposition. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Value Of McCann's Industry Influence? Priceless

Value Of McCann’s Industry Influence? Priceless

Groundbreaking Global Strategies, Innovative Operations Set Pioneer Agency Apart From the Rest

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — From the start, McCann Erickson proved itself a pioneer in the ad business, beating other networks to the globalization trend of the 1980s by several decades. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Snickers Uses Humor to Satisfy Generations of Hunger

Snickers Uses Humor to Satisfy Generations of Hunger

World’s Best-Selling Candy Bar Has Differentiated Itself With the Idea That It’s More Than Just a Chocolate Snack

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Talk about a depression baby with staying power: Snickers, introduced in 1930, is a $2 billion brand proposition today. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Fisher-Price Plays, Laughs and Grows Into Global Brand

Fisher-Price Plays, Laughs and Grows Into Global Brand

Toy Company Founded in Depression Has Evolved Into ‘Children’s Product Company’ With Multiple Integrations

YORK, Pa. (AdAge.com) — For Fisher-Price, what began as toddler toy-making has grown up into a global brand that is now part of the Mattel empire. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Fortune Rides the Booms and Busts of Business

Fortune Rides the Booms and Busts of Business

Once-Ambitious Idea Has Consistently Covered the Ups and Downs While Feeling Them Itself

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Much like Ad Age, Fortune began life at about the worst possible time for a new business: the dawn of the Great Depression. But it was born, in reality, of success, namely the recent triumph of Henry Luce’s then-young Time magazine, founded in 1923. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Tums Brand, Like Acid Indigestion, Is Timeless

Tums Brand, Like Acid Indigestion, Is Timeless

Antacid Thrives in Its Journey From Accidental Remedy to Trusted Household Name Remembered Fondly for Jingle

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — “Tums, Tum-Tum-Tum, Tums!” That famous jingle, set to the dramatic opening bars of the theme from the TV show “Dragnet,” just might be what people remember most about Tums, the famous antacid that was born the same year as Advertising Age. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Twinkies: Sweet Treat Continues to Delight

Twinkies: Sweet Treat Continues to Delight

Though It’s Had Its Share of Criticism, Cream-Filled Snack Still Takes the Cake When It Comes to Consumer Demand

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Twinkies have inspired love, curiosity and criticism, not to mention a cookbook, campaign reform and plenty of urban legends in the 80 years since James A. Dewar created them. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

The Most Influential Brands of 2090

Media Guy’s Grandson Reports From the Future (No Hot-Tub Time Machine Required!)

Apparently “Media Guy” Grandpa Simon wrote a lot of so-called listicles. So when Ad Age asked me to come up with a list of some of the most influential brands of 2090 — and to look back at where they were 80 years ago (if they were even around back then) — I jumped at the chance. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Up in Smoke: Documents From the Annals of Tobacco Marketing

Up in Smoke: Documents From the Annals of Tobacco Marketing

A Collection of Internal Memos, Press Releases and Reports That Changed the Way Cigarettes Were Sold

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Advertising Age’s 80th anniversary report includes three major tobacco-related events. Here is a sampling of documents related to those events.

http://adage.com/adage80/

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Advertising Age: 80 Years of Ideas – Advertising Age – Special Report: 80 Years of Ideas


We Look at the Events, Brands and Trends That Have Shaped Marketing — and the Ones Still to Come

When Ad Age published its first issue in 1930, the stock market had just tanked, and a Great Depression was only beginning. Consumer spending plunged 41% from 1929 to the Depression’s 1933 nadir.

Ad Age's first issue, from 1930.
Ad Age’s first issue, from 1930.

A problem for consumer marketing, media and advertising? Actually, a remarkable opportunity.

In this report, we profile great brands that made their debuts in 1930 and went on to be market leaders: Fortune and Fisher-Price, Motorola and McCann Erickson, Twinkies and Tums. And in an accompanying timeline, we assemble 80 highlights from 80 years.

The past offers key lessons. First: There is never a bad time to launch a great product or company. (The biggest opportunities on the internet were born of or after the dot-com crash. Just ask Google and Facebook.)

Second: Failure is a cost of business. When Apple‘s first wireless device (1993’s Newton) flopped, Ad Age noted, “The category may give a new twist to Newton’s law: Products may be falling now, but the category is still poised to soar — eventually. … Smart money still is betting on long-term prospects for wireless portable communications devices.” Apple came back with iPod (2001), iPhone (2007) and iPad (2010).

Third: The best marketers, media firms and agencies boast an outstanding ability to reinvent themselves and lead their changing markets decade after decade.

The best example is Procter & Gamble Co.; see our 1931, 1980 and 1994 entries. And just last week, P&G rightfully became the first corporation inducted into the American Advertising Federation’s Advertising Hall of Fame.

Ad Age has covered the rise of new media — again and again: Radio, which went from essentially zero to 55% household penetration in 12 years; TV (0.4% to 55% penetration in six years); cable (6% to 50% in 19 years); internet (broadband penetration soared from 1.7% to 54% in eight years).

We’ve tracked the emergence of new technologies: Refrigerators (from 15% household penetration to 50%-plus during the 1930s); wireless phones (a 22-year ride from 1983 debut to 50% household penetration). We’ve also witnessed how innovators can build remarkable businesses around emerging media and technologies. Cable? Ted Turner. Refrigerators? Birds Eye frozen foods. Computers? Bill Gates’ and Paul Allen’s Micro-Soft.

Ad Age’s 12-page debut issue mentions some now-faded brands such as Saturday Evening Post and Plymouth cars.

But the issue also notes brands that are very much in the game today: Time, The New Yorker, Quaker Oats, Buick, NBC. And Gillette, which at the time was preparing to launch a new-and-improved razor and blade.

http://adage.com

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