The Dummies’ Guide To Creating Your Own Facebook Cover Photo // thnxz to @simplyzesty and @Claire_Brown_


Via http://www.simplyzesty.com/

This tutorial will show you how to create your own integrated timeline masthead using Photoshop. So not only will you have an amazing cover photo for your business page at the end of this tutorial, but we’ll also be going through and using some of the essential tools in Photoshop.

TutorialMain

We’re even providing a PSD template for you to download, meaning all the hard work is done and you don’t need to worry about all the dimensions and measuring up! This template will ensure that you create seamless continuity between the two images.

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Google Chrome: How to make it faster, smarter and better than before // thnxz to pcworld.com – @pcworld Cc/ @awawro @MarcoChiappetta


Power extensions

If you don’t already have the latest version of Google Chrome installed and running properly on your system, take those preliminary steps now. Afterward, open the Chrome Web Store, and you’ll see an overwhelming array of Chrome apps for augmenting your browser with games, music players, and social networks. The extensions we’ll focus on here are designed to make Chrome leaner, meaner and more efficient.

FastestChrome: As its name would lead you to expect, FastestChrome adds a few useful time-saving tools to your Chrome browser. Its features consist mainly of surface-level stuff, such as displaying a pop-up bubble with an explanation of a word whenever you highlight one, and providing the option to look up that word on any of four different search engines (Wikipedia, DuckDuckGo, Surf Canyon, and of course Google.)

FastestChrome automatically loads the next page of a website and shares the definition of any word you highlight in Chrome.

The extension also lets you choose to automatically transform written URL text into clickable links (which makes reading email messages from less tech-savvy friends a lot easier), and its Endless Pages feature automatically loads the next page of a website (think Google search results or an eight-page Vanity Fair article) so you won’t waste precious seconds clicking Next and waiting for the page to load.

Google Quick Scroll: This extension whisks you straight to the search terms you’re looking for on any given website. With Google Quick Scroll installed in Google Chrome, every time you click through a search link, a tiny box containing a preview of the text highlighted in your search result will pop up in the bottom-right corner of your browser. Click that box, and Chrome will take you there without further ado.

Chrome Toolbox: Install the Chrome Toolbox to open multiple bookmarks in a single click, to cache unsubmitted form data so you can avoid retyping it each time you create a new profile, to magnify images and video right from within your browser, and in general to make Chrome twice as useful as it already is.

Experiment at your own risk

To reach Google Chrome’s hidden experimental options, first launch Chrome; then typechrome://flags/ in the address field, and press Enter. You’ll jump to a page containing an array of experimental options, a few of which directly affect browser performance. To see other hidden Chrome menus that you can access via the address field, typechrome://chrome-urls/ in the address bar and then press Enter. The ‘flags’ page is where Chrome parks all of the hidden and experimental options, so that’s where we’re headed.

The hidden ‘flags’ menu in Google Chrome is home to various experimental options that can influence the browser’s performance.

At this is the point, we’d normally offer a disclaimer about messing around with experimental features in an application—but Google has handled that task quite well on its own. The first thing you’ll see when you reach Chrome’s flags options is a huge warning that reads as follows:

Careful, these experiments may bite! WARNING These experimental features may change, break, or disappear at any time. We make absolutely no guarantees about what may happen if you turn one of these experiments on, and your browser may even spontaneously combust. Jokes aside, your browser may delete all your data, or your security and privacy could be compromised in unexpected ways. Any experiments you enable will be enabled for all users of this browser. Please proceed with caution.”

Though the stuff we’ll discuss doing in this article is more likely to cause simple rendering errors or to adversely affect performance than to wreak any major havoc, caution is appropriate.

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Paper Prototyping and 5 Analog Tools for Web and Mobile Designers


1stwebdesigner - Web Design Blog

Designers love analog tools. No wonder. These tools lets us physically interact with interfaces and speed up the design process, like paper prototyping. What takes hours in the digital world can be sketched out in a matter of minutes.

That’s why analog methods of prototyping are especially valuable right at the beginning of projects – when speed matters the most. Working with paper, or perhaps a whiteboard, can accelerate the speed of our learning loops. Sketch, feedback, sketch, feedback, sketch feedback – you can go through dozens of iterations in one day and you’ll set solid foundations for the rest of the work. Consider it kind of premium insurance. Getting rough feedback quickly can save you a lot of work.

No wonder, according to research by Todd Zaki Warfel, paper prototyping is still the most commonly used prototyping method! Yes, while we tend to disagree if we should code prototypes or just use prototyping software, the use of analogue tools in our design process is unquestionable! Honestly, I don’t know any designer who is not going through early stage paper prototyping sessions.

Of course in paper prototyping we pay the price of low-fidelity and while it might not be a problem for your team to discuss lo-fi deliverables, in my experience, it’s always a problem for stakeholders. To avoid misunderstandings and accusations that you’re playing with paper instead of working, just make paper prototyping an internal method for your team.

Analogue methods are supported by User Experience pioneers such as Bill Buxton, author of Sketching User Experience and Carolyn Snyder author of Paper Prototyping. They highly recommend breaking away from the computer once in a while and collaboratively work on the analog side of the design moon. According to them, paper prototyping:

  • keeps all team members motivated (as they can easily participate in paper prototyping sessions)
  • lets designers iterate quickly and gather feedback very soon in the process
  • gives designers freedom since paper has no boundaries

preview large goodprototypingbook design tools design tips design

And though many believe that the rise of tablets may end paper prototyping in the next couple of years, I’d disagree. The physical nature of paper prototyping, its speed and straight forward form (understandable by anyone), makes it unbeatable by any digital gadget. Tablet devices are just another medium of digital prototyping (perhaps better than computer, who knows…) than replacement of analog methods.

In recent years we can observe attempts to optimize paper prototyping by the creation of dedicated tools. I tried most of them and I’m addicted to some (UXPin, UI Stencils). They hugely improved my workflow. Dedicated paper prototyping tools gave me speed that exceeds everything that I tried before. I feel more professional with a well crafted notepad in hand than a crumpled piece of paper with messy sketches on it. This confidence helps me discuss my analog work both with teammates and stakeholders. Most of the tools that I present below have been around for couple of years and I guess they’re doing great.

My fingers are crossed for these brave entrepreneurs.

Have fun!

Note: At the end of article I listed some of my favourite printable templates – they are ready to use and FREE!

UXPin – Paper prototyping notepads



Popular paper prototyping notepads with an original idea. User Interface elements are printed on separate sticky notes, which let you quickly create prototypes and iterate by re-sticking parts of the interface. Additionally, notepads are equipped with a sketchbook (with printed browser/iPhone), project kick-off and personas forms, as well as diagramming, gridded, paper. Hard-covered, well-designed and beautifully crafted books are $29.99 with free DHL delivery to USA, Canada and EU, if you buy any 3 of them. Since people from Google, IBM, Microsoft use them – UXPin notepads has sort of become an industry classic.

Finished prototypes can be auto-converted into digital, HTML, wireframes by UXPin App and this is one of the coolest things I have ever seen in the User Experience Design field.

Phone Doo – Magnetic boards  Leer más “Paper Prototyping and 5 Analog Tools for Web and Mobile Designers”

Cómo gestionar y liberar la memoria de Google Chrome


 

Avatar de Randal (Perfil) | Bitelia

Desde su aparición hace unos pocos años, Google Chrome ha ido evolucionando hasta convertirse en el navegador más usado a día de hoy. Y es normal, porque Google ha sido uno de los impulsores de la web que hoy conocemos, y ha sabido superar a Mozilla Firefox, que les sigue muy de cerca.

Google Chrome Logo

Sin embargo, no todo han sido buenas noticias y mejoras. Los añadidos y nuevas funcionalidades tienen un precio, y el Chrome de hoy no es el mismo en materia de rendimiento en el sistema. Si bien sigue siendo seguramente la opción más recomendable, muchos usuarios hemos visto que dicho rendimiento se ha resentido, y dependiendo del equipo donde se ejecute, puede funcionar bastante peor que sus primeras versiones.

Por eso hoy que querido dar algunos consejos para mejorar el rendimiento, gestionar y liberar la memoria.

Ventanas y pestañas

El primer consejo es sencillo. ¿Has notado que Chrome se ralentiza cuando tienes muchas pestañas abiertas? Es lógico. Actualmente el navegador cuenta con funcionalidades que deshabilitan los plug-ins en caso de carga masiva, pero esto hará que se cierren páginas que seguramente estáis utilizando como Gmail, o dejen de emitir notificaciones.

Chrome pestañas

El consejo por tanto es mantener sólo las pestañas que necesitemos abiertas, evitando que éstas produzcan problemas debido a páginas que hace horas -o días- que no consultamos. Mi recomendación es que fijéis las pestañas habituales para tener identificadas las imprescindibles, y si trabajáis mucho tiempo con Chrome reviséis de vez en cuando el resto de pestañas abiertas: puede que no las necesitéis. Lo mismo se aplica a ventanas secundarias o incluso de incógnito.

Gestión de extensiones y aplicaciones

Los complementos del navegador añaden funcionalidades y en muchas ocasiones opciones que acaban siendo imprescindibles. Gestores de notas, herramientas de bookmarking, o plug-ins para captura y modificación de imágenes son habituales, pero cuando instalamos demasiadas pueden afectar al rendimiento del navegador y por tanto del sistema.

Chrome extensión

Una buena recomendación es la de revisar de vez en cuando la lista de extensiones y aplicaciones de las que disponemos y hacer una limpia: seguramente no necesitemos muchas de ellas.

Las extensiones pueden suponer un alto porcentaje de carga en un navegador que puede dejar de responder correctamente, y por mucho que nos ayuden, pueden resultar en una herramienta en la que no podamos navegar la página web más sencilla.

Administrador de Tareas Leer más “Cómo gestionar y liberar la memoria de Google Chrome”

Seis sencillas “buenas prácticas” cuando usemos HTML5


Txema Rodríguez  | genbetadev.com

 

Quizás muchos de vosotros os estéis iniciando en HTML5, por eso es bueno comenzar con unas cuantas buenas prácticas de HTML5 desde el principio. Son bastante básicas, pero no está de más recordar alguna de ellas, ya que sobre todo nos ayudarán a crear un mejor código HTML5.

Usar un generador de plantillas básicas

Al comenzar a desarrollar una web normalmente lo primero es definir los elementos básicos, buena parte de ellos son los mismos en casi todas las páginas, algunos tags iniciales como: header, footer, metas… Para crear este esqueleto básico podemos usar alguno de los generadores de plantillas disponibles en forma online.

Algunos de los más conocidos son SwitchToHTML5Shikiryu generator. Sin olvidarnos de el excelenteHTML5 Boilerplate.

Tener siempre a mano un cheat sheet de HTML5

Seamos sinceros. No conocemos todos los tags HTML5 y algunas veces muchos de ellos se nos olvidan con frecuencia. Eso sin contar los nuevos que se van introduciendo. Así que lo mejor es tener siempre a mano una (cheat sheet) de HTML5. Podéis encontrar unas cuantas sobre tags,event handler o soporte en navegadores en la web siempre actualizadas.

Ser cuidadoso con la compatibilidad de los elementos que usemos Leer más “Seis sencillas “buenas prácticas” cuando usemos HTML5″