Innovation Matrix 4.0 – timkastelle.org


If you google “innovation,” you get more than 417 million results. If you narrow it down to “Innovation Management” you knock that number down to 3,160,000 results.

On amazon, you get 228,716 hits for “Innovation.”  54,485 of those are in Books.  You can cut the number down to 1,330 in the Patio, Lawns & Garden category, but that probably doesn’t do you much good.

If you’re trying to make your organisation more innovative, how can you navigate all of the available resources?

That’s one of the problems that I’ve been trying to solve with The Innovation Matrix.  It’s changed a lot since the last time you’ve seen it.  I’ve been using my Artefact Cards to help figure out how things work.

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First up, the big news: I’m collaborating on this now with Nilofer Merchant! She and I are developing the ideas together, and as we start to roll them out in earnest, you’ll see some big differences.  She explains what we’re up to here:

It is an idea that when developed could help any organization figure out where they are, and the moves to take based on where they want to be.

We’ll be sharing as we go. Which means anyone — quite possibly you — will have ideas on what to include or cover or you will start to challenge our thinking and in doing so, shape ours. You will ultimately be the sharers of those ideas, if you deem them worthy.

For now, I’d just like to outline the rationale behind this tool.

Innovation is important because it drives growth.  It may seem like a buzzword, but if you want to grow, you’ll need to innovate.  That’s why you need to find a way through all those results on google and amazon. Leer más “Innovation Matrix 4.0 – timkastelle.org”

To Innovate You Must Live With Uncertainty

If you can’t deal with uncertainty, you end up wanting to jump straight to the last bit – where we have conclusions, decisions and action.

But if you do that, you spend very little time on the first step, where you really explore the range of possible questions and ideas. And you don’t get into the middle bit at all, where you experiment, think, and prototype.

The kicker on these projects is that we have to move through this process twice. First in defining the problem to solve, and then in again in trying to actually solve it. So just when we reach a point of certainty, we’ll be thrown back into uncertainty in the second loop – and this is the real danger area.

Innovation requires uncertainty. Uncertainty is what leads to variation in ideas, and this variety is necessary for finding the best answer to whatever problem you’re trying to solve.

This is why I’ve said that the single most important management skill to develop is a tolerance for ambiguity.

If our students can do that in the course of these projects, then they will be successful.

If you can improve your tolerance for ambiguity, you will be a better innovator too.


This post was written by Tim.
http://timkastelle.org

I’m starting up a couple of live consulting projects with some of our MBA students. Even though we are very early in the projects, they have already reminded me of just how critical it is to develop the ability to live with uncertainty.

This is the fundamental point that Jonathan Fields makes in Uncertainty: Turning Fear and Doubt into Fuel for Brilliance.

Fields contends that you can only do innovative and creative work by learning to live with, or even embrace uncertainty.

For the artist, entrepreneur, or other creator, the outcome-centric approach to visualization that’s most commonly offered can be an exercise in both futility and frustration. Actually, it’s worse. Because if you are someone who’s capable of creating a highly specific definition of your precise outcome in advance and you follow the straightest line to that outcome and remain utterly committed to that vision, you’ll get there faster. But you’ll also increase the likelihood that the very same blinders that send you on a beeline toward your planned outcome will lead you to completely miss a host of unplanned paths and options that, had you been open to seeing them, would have markedly improved your final creation. You’ll get exactly what you wanted, then realize it’s not what it could have been. Leer más “To Innovate You Must Live With Uncertainty”

Don’t Be First to Market, Be First to Scale

Often when people have an idea for a great new product or service, they rush to be first to market with it. We keep hearing about first-mover advantage and how you need it.

The only problem with first-move advantage is that it doesn’t seem to exist. The academic research on the topic shows that there is no such thing.

The first definitive work on this was done by David Teece in 1986 (pdf version of the paper here). He found that innovators capture about 20% of the profits generated by their new ideas. Followers and imitators capture slightly more. Suppliers get some of the benefit, but the big winners are customers, who get about 40% of the benefit of new ideas.

The study was done 25 years ago, but subsequent work has consistently found similar results.

Part of this is because innovations diffuse across an S-Curve – and this usually takes longer than we expect it to.


http://timkastelle.org/blog/

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Often when people have an idea for a great new product or service, they rush to be first to market with it. We keep hearing about first-mover advantage and how you need it.

The only problem with first-move advantage is that it doesn’t seem to exist. The academic research on the topic shows that there is no such thing.

The first definitive work on this was done by David Teece in 1986 (pdf version of the paper here). He found that innovators capture about 20% of the profits generated by their new ideas. Followers and imitators capture slightly more. Suppliers get some of the benefit, but the big winners are customers, who get about 40% of the benefit of new ideas.

The study was done 25 years ago, but subsequent work has consistently found similar results.

Part of this is because innovations diffuse across an S-Curve – and this usually takes longer than we expect it to.

How can innovators try to capture more of the profits generated by their great ideas? It’s not by being first to market. In his excellent new book Sidestep & Twist: How to create hit products and services that people will queue up to buy,James Gardner suggests that one way to address this problem is use network effects to accelerate the S-Curve – to be the first to scale. Leer más “Don’t Be First to Market, Be First to Scale”

End of Year Innovation Questions

As you may have already guessed, John and I are mentally wiped out right now and are taking a short break from blogging. We’re saving up ideas and posts and will be ready to go again once the new year starts.

In the meantime, here are a few questions to consider. If you’d like to answer them in the comments, it would be fun to have a discussion on these issues:

1. What’s the most innovative thing you’ve done this year?
2. What will you do next year to build on this year’s success?
3. What is your greatest innovation challenge right now?


Thnxs to Tim Kastelle & John Steen | Innovation Leadership Network
http://timkastelle.org

As you may have already guessed, John and I are mentally wiped out right now and are taking a short break from blogging. We’re saving up ideas and posts and will be ready to go again once the new year starts.

In the meantime, here are a few questions to consider. If you’d like to answer them in the comments, it would be fun to have a discussion on these issues:

  1. What’s the most innovative thing you’ve done this year?
  2. What will you do next year to build on this year’s success?
  3. What is your greatest innovation challenge right now? Leer más “End of Year Innovation Questions”