App translates languages during real-time phonecalls | springwise.com


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Japan24th October. Web users can already easily take advantage of translation services that convert text from one language to another, and we’ve also seen TransFire bring that capability to web-based instant messaging on smartphones. Providing a similar service for speech conversations, Japan-based NTT DOCOMO is launching its Hanashite Hon’yaku app, which offers …Read More 

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Fully electric urban car can make itself smaller


Researchers at MIT’s Changing Places Group and Denokinn have now begun testing the Hiriko Fold, a fully electric vehicle which is able to collapse into a more compact shape when parking.

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 The two-seater vehicle has one large door at the front to save yet more space. Each wheel can be controlled independently of the others, allowing for sharper turning and easier parallel parking into tight spaces. The following video gives a demonstration of the Hiriko Fold in action:

We recently saw the Lit C-1 provide a glimpse into the future of transport design, and now researchers at MIT’s Changing Places Group and Denokinn have begun testing the Hiriko Fold, a fully electric vehicle which is able to collapse into a more compact shape when parking.We first heard about the project while it was still in the concept development phase, but the team have since created a working model of the Fold, which is being test driven around the streets of Vitoria-Gasteiz, in the Basque region of Spain. Leer más “Fully electric urban car can make itself smaller”

In Italy, site lets users crowdsource small and last-minute grocery deliveries


Late last year we featured Massachusetts-based NeighborFavor, a site that lets college students earn cash by helping each other with their shopping, and recently we came across a variation on that same premise in a different part of the world. Based in Italy this time, Milk, Please! is an online service that lets consumers crowdsource help with small and last-minute grocery deliveries.

Consumers who realize they need a grocery item at home but can’t make it to the store themselves can send a request to Milk, Please!, which is accessible online as well as via smartphones and special stations in supermarkets. From there, someone who is already at the store or planning to visit it soon can view the request and add the item to their own shopping list, if they so choose. They then drop the item off on their way home, and Milk, Please! handles their compensation. The video below depicts the Milk, Please! premise at work… Leer más “In Italy, site lets users crowdsource small and last-minute grocery deliveries”

QR codes used to encourage citizens to adopt neighborhood trees

Four wards in the district – Adams Morgan, Brookland, Fairlawn and Tenleytown – will be the sites for the piloting of the scheme, which will see new trees planted on the state’s streets tagged with a QR code. Passersby who scan the images with a smartphone will be automatically directed towards a form on the Department of Transportation website to register their interest in caring for the tree. Adoption involves applying ten gallons of water to the tree each week between the beginning of spring to the start of winter, clearing away weeds or litter and alerting the department to any larger maintenance requirements. Canopy Keeper registrants receive a slow-drip watering tub free of charge to help them carry out their task. According to the scheme’s organizers, although the department has its own tree maintenance staff, it relies on the help of citizens to keep the trees thriving.

The Canopy Keepers’ QR code scheme makes it easier for the residents and businesses of DC to help out in their local community. One to replicate elsewhere?


 

Designer handbag can charge a phone while on the go


 

Motorbikes made safer with airbag jackets

Having already developed a working airbag sewn into clothing for motorcycle racing professionals, Dainese has now produced a version suitable for street riders. The protective gear comes in two parts – the J-Kit, which is the clothing unit, and the M-Kit, which is the bike unit. The J-Kit features a pneumatic gas system fitted into the rider’s clothing, which generates the air needed to fill the 12-liter airbags positioned at key points in the armour. An electronic radio system sends data between the bike and the riding gear to release the airbags upon detection of an event.


Italian company Dainese has developed D-air Street, an airbag system incorporated into the rider’s clothing and bike to protect those on two-wheels.

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Road accidents still make up a large proportion of deaths each year and we’ve covered a number of examples designed to reduce fatalities — most recently the Volvo V40 external airbag. Seeking to provide better protection for motorcyclists, Italian company Dainese has developed D-air Street, an airbag system incorporated into the rider’s clothing and bike.

Having already developed a working airbag sewn into clothing for motorcycle racing professionals, Dainese has now produced a version suitable for street riders. The protective gear comes in two parts – the J-Kit, which is the clothing unit, and the M-Kit, which is the bike unit. The J-Kit features a pneumatic gas system fitted into the rider’s clothing, which generates the air needed to fill the 12-liter airbags positioned at key points in the armour. An electronic radio system sends data between the bike and the riding gear to release the airbags upon detection of an event. The M-Kit comprises of sensors on the bike forks and frame as well as an electronic control unit which detects an impact. Once an event is identified, the system takes 45 milliseconds to deploy the airbag. Set to be released in May, the M-Kit is priced at GBP 389.99, the D-air Street Waistcoat will be available for GBP 639.99 and the D-air Street Gore-Tex for GBP 1,309.99. The video below shows… Leer más “Motorbikes made safer with airbag jackets”

In France, QR code stickers provide medical data for emergency responders

Japanese-based Asahi Kasei has previously used RFID technology in portable charms to alert medical personnel to important patient information when dealing with emergencies. Now, using stickers featuring QR codes, Code d’Urgence in France is also on a mission to improve data delivery to those responding to accidents and emergencies.

Those registering for the service must first fill out a medical questionnaire from the company, which must be validated by a doctor. Users pay for an annual subscription, costing EUR 36, and this information is then stored on a secure server approved by the Ministére de la Santé for one year.

The company then sends out 10 stickers featuring a unique QR code to the user, suitable for placing onto motorcycle helmets, bike frames, behind watch faces or on the back of cell phones — the company provides a list of recommended sticker locations upon subscription.


Code d’Urgence provides customers with 10 stickers featuring a unique QR code that links to their medical history.

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Japanese-based Asahi Kasei has previously used RFID technology in portable charms to alert medical personnel to important patient information when dealing with emergencies. Now, using stickers featuring QR codesCode d’Urgence in Franceis also on a mission to improve data delivery to those responding to accidents and emergencies.Those registering for the service must first fill out a medical questionnaire from the company, which must be validated by a doctor. Users pay for an annual subscription, costing EUR 36, and this information is then stored on a secure serverapproved by the Ministére de la Santé for one year.The company then sends out 10 stickers featuring a unique QR code to the user, suitable for placing onto motorcycle helmets, bike frames, behind watch faces or on the back of cell phones — the company provides a list of recommended sticker locations upon subscription.

The code can be read quickly by medical professionals equipped with the secure Code d’Urgence smartphone app, enabling them to respond in the best way possible. According to the developers, Code d’Urgence is the only system of its kind to have been made in collaboration with the country’s SAMU (Service d’Aide Médicale Urgente) and SMUR (Service Mobile d’Urgence et Reanimation) doctors. It is also compliant with the Commission Nationale Informatique et Liberté, which means all the medical data is secure and only accessible to medical professionals. The video below contains more details >>>> Leer más “In France, QR code stickers provide medical data for emergency responders”