What Might A Social Media Planner Want From A Brand Ambassador | social.ogilvy.com


 

This post first appeared on Leo Ryan’s blog “Burning Head.” 

In the previous post I looked at what sorts of things a social planner might want to ask for when negotiating an event sponsorship. In this post I’ll explore what we might want to agree with a Brand Ambassador. Thanks to @Amymabin and @Vic_newlands for their significant input into to this.

As with the last post, this is not an exhaustive list of what can be done with an ambassador, but rather a check list of the kinds of permissions, rights and access that you might want to request when negotiating the partnership so that we can make the most of the relationship in social media.

Leaving aside all of the difficulties that sponsoring individuals can involve let’s just assume the ambassador is a great brand fit and is largely drugs free. Given this positive connection we’ll probably be trying to create social media occasions to amplify that and broadly this amplification will fall into categories of either paid social media, owned or earned media (although as I wrote this post those categories continued to undermine each other, merge and generally not be as helpful as I’d have liked).

Earned Social Media and what we might want from a brand ambassador
Often it is the case that a brand has developed a relationship with an ambassador not just for their image, but also for their own personal social media audience and reputation. If that’s the case we need to make sure that everyone; the brand, the ambassador, the brand’s followers and importantly the ambassador’s followers are all going to be comfortable with the association and see the benefits of it. Especially the followers.

If we are appointing an ambassador for the size of their audience we also need to be realistic about what that is. On twitter, not all followers are equal. In fact lots might just be porn-bots. There are some incredible audience figures out there; Lady Gaga has more than 33 million followers, Wayne Rooney more than five and a half million and David Cameron’s official Prime Minster’s handle has 2.2 million. Howeveran analysis of their top 100,000 followers by a UK company reveals that only a small percentage of their followers are ‘real’ people: Lady Gaga has only 29% “good” followers, Wayne Rooney 30% and David Cameron 37%. So you might want to do some authentication before paying an ambassador for their audience.

And while we’re on the subject of Wayne Rooney…this time last year Wayne Rooney and Jack Wilshire both tweeted #makeitcount and a link to the Nike campaign website which resulted in their sponsor Nike being censured by the ASA and the footballers being required to delete the tweets. Subsequently the ASA posted this article with the advice that the footballers should have used the hostage #ad or #spon in their tweets.

So with those two caveats in place we might want an ambassador to tweet hashtags related to campaigns and links to campaign sites. Similarly we might want them to share brand assets with their audience in other media specific channels; images up on Picassa, videos on YouTube and so on. Assuming a good fit bewteen the brand’s target audience and the ambassador’s followers, this can be really useful; if these assets are going to be of real value or interest to the ambassador’s audience they may then then re-share them with their networks with all of the added value and credibility that come from a friend’s recommendation. But make sure they are of real value. No quicker way to turn off a social audience than to spam them with unwanted commercial messages, and your ambassador certainly won’t thank you for pissing off their hard earned followers.

To leverage the ambassador’s existing social profile on the brand’s properties you’ll want permission to link to all of their public social profiles, permission to tag them in posts and permission to share their posts when appropriate.

Owned / Paid Social Media and what we might want from a brand ambassador
Recent media options like promoted posts and promoted tweets have made the whole owned / paid distinction a little murky. We can post to our owned Facebook Page audience (which will reach approx 16% of them) and then pay to have that post promoted to reach a larger audience. Of our own existing facebook audience. Which feels a bit like owned media…Promoted tweets are similar except that we can pay for our tweets to go to a new audience who don’t currently follow us, which feels a lot more like paid media, except that it’s also going to our owned audience…sigh. Oh for the days of a 30 second TVC.

Regardless, as a brand we may want to include the ambassador in our owned and paid social media. This could include using their image or quotes in adverts on Facebook or YouTube, but it might also include some of the newer paid media formats; promoted posts posts and promoted tweets. Which begs the question of whose tweets and posts are being promoted; the brand’s or the ambassador’s? If it’s the Brand’s it’s a little more straight forward; clearly there’s a commercial relationship. But if the brand is paying to promote the tweets or posts of the ambassador, we need to be completely transparent and make sure that we clearly signal this as per the Nike example above. Leer más “What Might A Social Media Planner Want From A Brand Ambassador | social.ogilvy.com”

Time for Brands to Get Innovational with Facebook


One of the biggest challenges I face at Social@Ogilvy is maintaining a simultaneous focus on innovation and operationalizing proven practices. Technically you cannot do both at the same time. It’s kind of like multitasking, which is really a myth. We “bounce” between tasks, never quite doing them at the same time. And just like multitasking, innovation and tweaking reliability cannot quite happen at the same time. Kind of like designing the car of the future even while you use it to pick up groceries everyday.

Yet there are few practices quite like applying social media to business to bring out the inner entrepreneur and Six Sigma black belt in all of us. We simply have to do both, if not simultaneously, then in quick succession. No sooner had we created a new way to audit a brand’s social presence (Social Brand Print) then we had rolled it out globally, making it more efficient and generally improving on the final product.

This is a brand leader’s dilemma in using social media. Just think about the marketers who demand new, innovative ways of using Facebook, for example, and then demand ROI in the next breath. ROI comes after innovation when you are trying to scale or make a process more reliable and efficient. Still, this is the boat we find ourselves in. And Facebook is the perfect platform for pursuing both innovation and operation.

Facebook helps us be “Innovational”

Facebook exceeded 1 billion users and 200 million of us actively post content in addition reading our friend’s updates. Forty percent of the world’s Internet users are on the platform.  It’s got scale which is certainly one of the attributes to look for when scaling and making more efficient. (Source: GlobalWebIndex)

The ad platform including the premium ads we love as sponsored stories are now handled automatically making them more efficient. Plenty of marketers like us have established a Facebook ad planning and buying “desk” staffed by social media experts who blend media knowledge with social media smarts. They sit adjacent to the community managers driving measurable engagement deeper and deeper. Pulling media back towards the content and creative teams is both innovative and operational.

Here are four ways you can fuel innovation on Facebook:

Facebook Studio – Nothing sparks innovation like examples of great work with a bit of a competitive edge. If you haven’t tapped into this site to see what brands and others are doing on Facebook, then kick back and browse around for an hour. Make an appointment to come back every week and submit your own work. You might win an award. Leer más “Time for Brands to Get Innovational with Facebook”

3 Insights From #TumblrCEO David Karp


Thinking Social / Value

#TumblrCEO David Karp visited Social@Ogilvy New York last week to share some of the key drivers of Tumblr’s explosive growth.

1. Keep Conversations Positive and Authentic

Karp believes, “Commenting is flawed. It slows conversation, and can be pernicious.”

As a result, Tumblr only offers users the ability to either reblog or “heart” content.  This strategy prevents negative comments and focuses user attention on a natural conversation flow, which helps explain why the average Tumblr blog receives an amazing nine (9) reblogs.

As a comparison, the industry average is 0.83 comments per blog post on other blogging services, says Karp.

Here’s an example of a creative illustration that has been reblogged almost 2,800 times.

2.  Celebrate the Artist … 

According to Karp, “there are 150 million Tumblr users across the globe, 60% of the audience is currently international.”

However, what really stands out is how 75% of page views on Tumblr are from logged-in users.  The strategy of developing a community is clearly working.  People log in because they want credit for their creations and don’t want to be anonymous when they comment on other’s work.

As a comparison, YouTube is currently seeing approximately 1% of views that come from logged-in users.

3. The Secret Weapon

According to Karp, ‘Tumblr Radar is like your friend who says, “Hey, have you seen this yet?’”

As a result, “the Tumblr Radar is the most sought-after spot in our network” because it showcases the most creative and interesting media in the network.

From a reach perspective, the Tumblr radar generates over 120 million daily pages across mobile and desktop devices. Cream rises to the top, as the Tumblr Radar is only updated a few times a day with only the best content.

Passing the Red-Face Test for Social Pros



Thinking Social
 / Value

While studying strategic issues management in grad school, one of my professors encouraged my fellow classmates and I to ask ourselves one question each time we suggested a response: “Does this pass the Red-Face Test?”

What he meant was, if someone were to dissect your answer and press you for more information, do you have a sufficient holistic grasp of the subject to at least speak to any possible inquiry without embarrassment … without your face turning red.

Working in social media, passing the Red-Face Test (or remembering to take it) can be a challenge. To be sure, we’re tasked with being expert in a disparate variety of areas. Many social media professionals, for example, jockey as statisticians, sociologists, authors, lawyers, marketers, PR practitioners, media buyers, IT specialists, teachers and more. Juxtapose those professions with an intimate knowledge — internally and externally — of the brand(s) they represent. To get inside the mind of a community manager, in particular, Get Satisfaction shares this brain diagram.


[Image courtesy of GetSatisfaction.com] Leer más “Passing the Red-Face Test for Social Pros”

Yes, Social Does Impact Sales | social.ogilvy.com


 

Recent research from Forrester suggests that social media has an insignificant impact on sales. While this may be true within the specific context of the study, the study’s methodology makes it impossible to draw broad conclusions around the impact of social on sales across all of the “buyer journey.”

Here are three key reasons why:

  1. More comprehensive tracking of content engagement paints a very different portrait. The Forrester study tracked social as a driver of sales only if someone clicked a link on a social property and made an online purchase within 30 days. In fact, brand social strategy is about engaging people with the brand with the intent to increase sales in the future —  both online and offline. In a quick service restaurant study we did with partner ChatThreads last year, exposure to social media was a significant drive of sales increases. And, when combined with other media (for example, editorial and billboards) social exposure resulted in a 1.5-2x higher likelihood of purchase across all 5 restaurants in the category. Further, two more studies support a social-sales link: Edison Research’s study last year showed that 28% of social media users cited social networks as influencers of their purchase decision. And in a 2011 ROI Research study, just over 50% of respondents reported they would likely purchase a product after following the brand on Facebook or Twitter. Leer más “Yes, Social Does Impact Sales | social.ogilvy.com”

Social Media Are A Square | via social.ogilvy.com


Thinking Social / Value

Social Media are like a town square. A place that people frequent every day in order to meet with their friends. To share their news and exchange opinions about issues that matter to them. To learn about new things their friends like and suggest. Even to make new friends.

So what is the role of brands in that square? How do they fit in a place where real people talk mostly about themselves?

You could imagine brand properties in Social Media, as info-kiosks, set up in the town square. Kiosks that mostly provide information about brands, their products and their services, without actually selling them.

These kiosks might be full of advertising material and promotional leaflets. They might have registration forms for people interested in receiving news from the brand. And they usually let people in the square come into contact with brand representatives, to post questions and other inquiries. We usually call these info-kiosks “Facebook brand pages”!

And what brands mostly want to do in the “square” with their “info-kiosks” is to create big crowds around them, interested in what they advertise. They want to create buzz, and have more people coming in.

So what are the most usual ways they go about it?

1. Contests

Brands like to set up sweepstakes contests in their info-kiosks. They put big signs announcing the prizes, and hope that a big queue of people will form outside, all wanting to participate.

But even after people participate, they quickly go back to the conversation they were having with their friends in the square, since that is the real reason they came to the square for in the first place…

2. Content

Some brands believe that, if they fill their info-kiosks with interesting and relevant content, people will stay longer and consume it.

But while this strategy will keep some people coming back for more, it’ll only work for users already interested in a particular subject or brand, and won’t easily create buzz in the square, and massively bring new people to the info-kiosk.

3. Causes

Other brands prefer to stand for a cause, and call people who share the same beliefs to sign the cause and support it. Their pages act not unlike the kiosks political parties set up in squares in order to attract potential voters.

Brands could support issues ranging from ecology and human rights, down to the beauty of people with round curves, or support people who love dogs and cats! If you believe the cause, you sign up for the brand that supports it. But again, not everyone believes in the same things, so this strategy cannot usually create big buzz in the square.

So what could create buzz?

4. Experiences

There are brands that treat their info-kiosks like attractions in an amusement park! Magical experiences that people go in with excitement and walk out in amazement.

Here we have the kind of experiences you cannot wait to talk about with your friends at the square, and urge them not to miss them. The kind of experiences that leave you with a smile on your face, and perhaps a souvenir that all in the square can see from afar, and ask where you got it from.

We call these experiences viral Facebook applications!

Three steps in designing Facebook applications that create maximum buzz. Leer más “Social Media Are A Square | via social.ogilvy.com”

Closing the Empathy Gap


 

Anyone who tried to avoid hearing the Olympic results until the events aired hours later here in the United States knows how easily information flows across our social networks and into our consciousness. It didn’t matter if you preferred to wait to hear the results of the Men’s 400 meter relay.  If it mattered to your social network, the results of the race were going to find a way to get to you. 

The degree to which social media has become part of our every-day lives allow for greater opportunities for brands to understand and even empathize with consumers. Most brands have established listening posts, using either paid tools or at least a rudimentary Google alert-style monitoring program. These are designed to spot and quickly address detractors, and to uncover pockets of advocates and amplify those positive experiences.

But now, many brands are evolving those listening posts into new sources of empathy. New ways of understanding consumers and turning those insights into a competitive advantage.  This effort requires the social data and conversation-mapping experience, as well as the active participation of the Planning department.

The New York Times recently covered the “social focus group” phenomena describing the ways many brands use social media for product development/testing.  This is an especially important development for marketers, and actually brings us back to the time of Mad Men, when advertising agencies were so tied to product development that they had test kitchens in the office.  All of this is designed to break down some of the bureaucratic fortresses built up over the last 25 years, and get brand managers in closer proximity to, you know, real people.

As brands and agencies work to close this empathy gap, we’ll begin to discover there are many roles social media can augment, or even lead, in traditional planning research.   This is because great ideas are built on a cultural tension — some bigger issue that is, in some way, tangled up with the brand values*.

Social media, specifically real people engaging in continuous non-branded conversations, can help us chart this terrain.  This is based on the simple premise that most people do not talk much about brands in their daily lives,about 10 brand references per day on average —almost all in passing.**

So, how do we move from elementary listening and responding to a more sophisticated source of insight for planning creative, effective programs? Here’s an imperfect list of sources of empathy, and how brands are using the insights to drive business results.

Five Sources of Empathy Leer más “Closing the Empathy Gap”