Tools for Managing Multiple WordPress Sites | sixrevisions.com


 

5 Tools for Managing Multiple WordPress Sites from One Location

If you run more than one WordPress install, or if you have clients that run WordPress sites that you’re responsible for, then you know how much of a pain it can be to log in to each site every time you need to do things like update plugins, themes, or WordPress core itself.

With the release of WordPress 3.0, we now have the ability to create a network of WordPress sites with one installation through the multisite feature. However, your needs may go beyond what multisite allows you to do, and so you may need to explore other options.

Fortunately, there are a number of solutions out there that will let you manage multiple WordPress websites from one central location. In this article, I’ll share some options with you and give you a brief overview of each.

1. WP Remote

WP Remote

WP Remote is a simple and free solution that will allow you to do a few basic tasks related to managing multiple WordPress sites.

While you do need to install the WP Remote plugin for each WordPress installation, your administration panel for managing your sites is in one central location on the WP Remote site.

Here’s a look at the simple control panel on the WP Remote site:

WP Remote Features

  • Bulk update all WordPress installations
  • Create off-site backups
  • Update plugins that can be updated via the WordPress plugin page
  • Update themes that can be updated via the WordPress themes page

2. InfiniteWP

InfiniteWP

InfiniteWP is on a freemium model. (In other words, basic features are free, but you’ll need to pay for other feature upgrades such as auto-scheduling of WordPress site backups.)

Below is a video by the creators of InfiniteWP that will give you an idea of what the tool looks like:

InfiniteWP Free Features

The basic features of InfiniteWP are basic indeed, but they’re also pretty handy, and so many of us may not need the premium/paid features this plugin has. The basic features include the following:

  • One-click updates for the latest version of WordPress
  • Install and manage themes
  • Install and manage plugins
  • The ability to restore, download, and delete backups

InfiniteWP Premium Features

There are currently six available premium features available (with three more in the works). These are the currently available addons:

  • Install WordPress
  • Clone a WordPress installation
  • Schedule automated backups
  • Back up to repositories
  • Manage WordPress users
  • Save and run custom PHP code on multiple sites
  • Brand the InfiniteWP plugin with your company name or hide the plugin altogether

The premium addons currently in the works are the following:

  • Integration with Google Analytics
  • Manage posts and comments on multiple sites
  • Bulk create Posts, Pages, and Links

3. ManageWP   >>>>>>   Leer más “Tools for Managing Multiple WordPress Sites | sixrevisions.com”

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How to Create Content Maps for Planning Your Website’s Content | via sixrevisions.com


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How to Create Content Maps for Planning Your Website's Content

Content mapping is a visual technique that will help you organize and understand the content of a website. It can be a simple and valuable part of your site’s overallcontent strategy. This short and simple guide should help you get started.


What is Content Mapping?

Content mapping is similar to mind maps, but it’s focused on a site’s content. It will help you explore and visualize your content.

More specifically, content mapping allows you to see your content as it relates to the goals of your client, the goals of your site users and all the other pieces of content in your website (as well as external websites), allowing you to spot gaps (and opportunities) in your content development strategy.

I’ll cover two types of content mapping in this guide:

  1. Mapping your content to goals (the goals of the client and the goals of site users)
  2. Mapping your content to other content

We’ll focus on creating functional content maps that can be used (and understood) by everyone involved in the development of a website.

Note: Content mapping may lead to mind-melting over-complication! Content mapping should be quick and easy (just like a brainstorming session), but when you start referring to paragraphs as “information units” and blog posts as “content blocks”, it may be a sign that you may be making the process more complex than it needs to be.

We’re not building a site map, so try to keep your head above the concept of web pages and websites. You should keep yourself open to external content (e.g. tweets) and websites.

Why Should You Create Content Maps?

The primary purpose for creating content maps is to help you begin content development with a strong focus on site goals and the types of content you need to produce.

Below are some other reasons why you should create content maps.

Content Mapping Helps with Technology Decisions

By having a good vision as to the direction and potential requirements of the site’s content, we can make wise decisions at the start about the technologies we’ll use, and make sure that the content management system we choose will meet the needs of our content.

Content Mapping Helps Create a Shared Vision

Through common language and a shared vision of how everything works and fits together, you can encourage collaboration and additional idea-generation between the different individuals, teams and components involved in the website production process.

Content Mapping Helps Quickly Spot Gaps and Opportunities

By being able to visualize your content, you can potentially spot gaps that need to be filled and opportunities for additional content.

What You Need to Get Started with Content Mapping

Here are some things you’ll need in order to get the most out of content mapping:

  • An understanding of business goals: This includes knowing your clients well, and knowing what they want to get out of their website’s content.
  • An understanding of the site’s users: You know what content the site’s users need and why they go to the website.
  • An understanding of content requirements: You know the requirements and limitations (e.g., style, technical, legal, etc.) of the content you will produce.

If you’re working on an existing site or a site redesign project, it would also be wise to conduct a content audit (which I discuss in an article about incorporating content strategy into the web design process) to get an idea of what content already exists. While this might not be an incredibly fun experience, discovering content that can be re-purposed will save you tons of time in the long run.

Content Mapping Tools

In my opinion, the tools you use for content mapping aren’t hugely important; you could scrawl these maps on your kitchen wall using crayons if you wanted to.

However, it’s a good idea to create content maps using web-based tools that allow you to quickly share your outcome with the rest of your team.

Any tool that allows for diagramming and mind mapping can work. Two of my favorite tools are OmniGraffle (a diagramming tool for Mac) and Balsamiq (a wireframing and prototyping tool).

You can use a diagramming tool like OmniGraffle to create a content map.

Mapping Content to Goals

Your first two content maps should be linear. And, to be honest, they’re not really maps at all, they’re more like a paired list.

The first map will map your content to the goals of your client. The second map will map your content to the goals of the website’s users.

Mapping Content to the Goals of the Client

We can map the business goals of the client to the content that will achieve those goals.

Here’s a simple example of mapping content to the goals of the client:

Mapping Content to the Goals of the Site Users

For the other map, you’ll then want to map the content to the goals of the users of the site.

Here’s how you might map content to some of the goals of site users:

What Are These Content Maps For?

As you can see in the above examples, some client goals and user goals may have multiple results. This is a good thing — the more results, the better because we then have the potential to meet their goals in more than one way.

You should gain two insights from these maps:

  • An idea of the content you need to produce, as well as a list of any existing content you can readily use.
  • Labels for your content. These could be simple labels like “Help and Support” or “FAQ”.

Mapping Content to Other Content Leer más “How to Create Content Maps for Planning Your Website’s Content | via sixrevisions.com”

Designing Landing Pages That Work

Having knowledge on how to create an effective landing page can increase the number of site visitors that take the desired action of the web page. Lets discuss factors and considerations that can lead to a better landing page design.

What is a Landing Page?

Before we begin our discussion, it’s worth quickly defining what a landing page is.

From a web development/technical standpoint: A landing page consists of the same basic elements as any other web page (HTML, CSS, content copy, images, videos, etc.)
From a business standpoint: It’s a web page that asks users to perform a specific task such as purchasing something or subscribing to an email mailing list.
From a user standpoint: It’s a page they see after clicking on a hyperlink on another site (Google searches, a URL contained in a tweet, banner ad, etc).
Three popular reasons for creating a landing page are:

Get people to sign up (whether it’s for an account, a newsletter, etc.)
Sell a specific product in a specific situation (like a sale or a promotion)
Get people to download and install software
Guidelines to an Effective Landing Page Design


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Having knowledge on how to create an effective landing page can increase the number of site visitors that take the desired action of the web page. Lets discuss factors and considerations that can lead to a better landing page design.

What is a Landing Page?

Designing Landing Pages That Work

Before we begin our discussion, it’s worth quickly defining what a landing page is.

  • From a web development/technical standpoint: A landing page consists of the same basic elements as any other web page (HTML, CSS, content copy, images, videos, etc.)
  • From a business standpoint: It’s a web page that asks users to perform a specific task such as purchasing something or subscribing to an email mailing list.
  • From a user standpoint: It’s a page they see after clicking on a hyperlink on another site (Google searches, a URL contained in a tweet, banner ad, etc).

Three popular reasons for creating a landing page are:

  • Get people to sign up (whether it’s for an account, a newsletter, etc.)
  • Sell a specific product in a specific situation (like a sale or a promotion)
  • Get people to download and install software

Guidelines to an Effective Landing Page Design >>>> Leer más “Designing Landing Pages That Work”