Just 15% Of Smartphone Users Trust All Mobile Apps With Personal Info


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truste-mobile-app-privacy-trust-july2012.pngOnly 15% of smartphone users trust all mobile applications with their personal information,according to [download page] a survey released in July 2012 by TRUSTe, conducted by Harris Interactive. Instead, mobile app consumers take a variety of steps to protect their personal information: 38% research the app online, and 34% check to see if an app has a privacy policy.30% will read that privacy policy (if it is provided), and 21% check for a third-party trustmark or seal. 19% will ask friends about trustworthiness.

Only 14% of smartphone users this year believe that their app stores only offer privacy-safe apps. That is down significantly from 25% in 2011, reveals the “2012 US Online and Mobile Privacy Perceptions Report.” Faced with a mobile app they distrust, 85% of smartphone users do not download it, while 8% limits the information they share with the app, 4% limit their usage of the app, and just 3% report they do not change their behavior.

Smartphone Users Uncomfortable Sharing Many Forms of Data

Smartphone users feel safest sharing their gender with mobile apps, with 49% saying they would consent to do so, with age (36%) and email (35%) following. On the other end of the spectrum, just 1% would consent to sharing their list of contacts, 3% their photos and videos, and 5% their home addresses. Only 6% of app users would consent to sharing web-surfing behavior, a key element of online behavioral advertising (OBA), and 58% expressly indicate they do not like OBA. Finally, 28% say they would not consent to sharing any personal data with mobile apps.

University of California-Berkeley researchers in July found a similar reticence about sharing personal contacts. While 82% of mobile owners store contact information on their devices, 81% of device owners would probably (30%) or definitely (51%) not allow social networking applications to mine those contacts for friend suggestions, and 93% would probably (18%) or definitely (75%) not allow a coupons app to mine the list in order to offer coupons to their contacts, per findings.

50% Would Opt Out Of OBA Leer más “Just 15% Of Smartphone Users Trust All Mobile Apps With Personal Info”

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Multiscreen Consumers Research and Engage Brands Digitally


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Not surprisingly, the more screens a consumer uses, the more likely he or she is to discover and research products online, versus offline. While 75% of two-screen (2SCRN) consumers list offline sources like word-of-mouth, catalogs and television as their primary way of discovering new products, that percentage drops to 63% for 4SCRN consumers. And, the more screens consumers use, the more likely they are to welcome digital engagement by marketers post-purchase, according to [pdf] a May 2012 report called “The Multiscreen Marketer,” conducted by eConsultancy on behalf of the the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB).

In an attempt to explore how the multi-screen affects shopping, if at all, consumers were asked to list their top three sources (both online or offline) for becoming aware of new products, researching products and finally, for being kept in touch with by brands.

First Impressions Are Offline Leer más “Multiscreen Consumers Research and Engage Brands Digitally”

Senior Marketers Seen Lagging in ROI Analysis of New Digital Tools

Only 14% of senior marketers whose companies use social network marketing say they are tying their efforts to financial metrics such as market share, revenue, profits, or lifetime customer value, while only 17% of those whose companies are using mobile advertising say they are doing so,according to [download page] a survey released in March 2012 by Columbia University’s Center on Global Brand Leadership and the New York American Marketing Association (NYAMA). This compares to 41% whose companies measure the financial impact of their email marketing, and 47% whose companies do so for their traditional direct mail marketing.

This is despite adoption of new digital tools such as social network accounts (85%) and mobile ads (51%) having risen to a point where they rival the adoption rates of more established channels such as sponsorship and events (90%), print advertising (85%), direct mail (74%), and TV and radio ads (59%).


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nyama-roi-measurement-marketing-channels-march2012.jpgOnly 14% of senior marketers whose companies use social network marketing say they are tying their efforts to financial metrics such as market share, revenue, profits, or lifetime customer value, while only 17% of those whose companies are using mobile advertising say they are doing so,according to [download page] a survey released in March 2012 by Columbia University’s Center on Global Brand Leadership and the New York American Marketing Association (NYAMA). This compares to 41% whose companies measure the financial impact of their email marketing, and 47% whose companies do so for their traditional direct mail marketing.

This is despite adoption of new digital tools such as social network accounts (85%) and mobile ads (51%) having risen to a point where they rival the adoption rates of more established channels such as sponsorship and events (90%), print advertising (85%), direct mail (74%), and TV and radio ads (59%). Leer más “Senior Marketers Seen Lagging in ROI Analysis of New Digital Tools”

Games Dominate Mobile Apps, Set for Revenue Growth

Games (49%) and social networking (30%) capture the largest proportion of consumer’s time spent with mobile applications, according to January 2012 analysis from Flurry, which notes that it does not track Facebook usage, such that the social networking category is actually larger than represented. Entertainment (7%) and news (6%) are the other major categories by consumption, though both trail the frontrunners by a large margin.

Apps Increase Lead Over Mobile Web

Flurry’s analysis shows a significant shift in daily interactive consumption over the last 18 months between the web (both desktop and mobile) and mobile native apps. Using Flurry Analytics data for mobile consumption, and comparing it to publicly available data from comScore and Alexa for web consumption, the analysis finds that smartphone and tablet users spent 94 minutes per day using applications in December 2011, compared to 81 minutes in June 2011. By contrast, during that time period, the average time spent on the web shrunk, from 74 minutes to 72 minutes.


Games (49%) and social networking (30%) capture the largest proportion of consumer’s time spent with mobile applicationsaccording to January 2012 analysis from Flurry, which notes that it does not track Facebook usage, such that the social networking category is actually larger than represented. Entertainment (7%) and news (6%) are the other major categories by consumption, though both trail the frontrunners by a large margin.

Apps Increase Lead Over Mobile Web Leer más “Games Dominate Mobile Apps, Set for Revenue Growth”