Apple fans in Argentina face an uncertain wait for the iPhone

Fans of the iPhone in Argentina may have to wait at least a year to officially purchase the Apple device, as the government continues to impose restrictions on imports of the world’s bestselling smartphone.

The Wall Street Journal reports that whilst the iPhone isn’t banned in the country, its restrictions on mobile operators extend to devices that are not in manufactured there. With Apple’s main supply partners located in Asia (for now), it doesn’t fulfill that criteria and therefore sales are restricted in the country.

According to the report, Apple only sold 3,000 iPhones in Argentina before government restrictions were put in place in March 2011, selling 30,000 in 2010. Whilst the device doesn’t appear to have been as successful in Argentina as in North America and parts of Europe, consumers are still purchasing Apple smartphones when they travel abroad or turn to auction or private trade websites to buy an unlocked handset from overseas.

In December, we questioned whether Argentina had actually banned the device, after reports suggested this was the case. While the ban and other details were false, imports of the iPhone were — and continue to be — blocked.

Apple lists three carriers on its website, two of which have iPhone references (one has listings for various models) but no way to buy them. The Movistar forum even has adedicated iPhone section, which is full of customers that have purchased iPhones overseas or second-hand but have issues using them on the operator’s networks.


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Fans of the iPhone in Argentina may have to wait at least a year to officially purchase the Apple device, as the government continues to impose restrictions on imports of the world’s bestselling smartphone.

The Wall Street Journal reports that whilst the iPhone isn’t banned in the country, its restrictions on mobile operators extend to devices that are not in manufactured there. With Apple’s main supply partners located in Asia (for now), it doesn’t fulfill that criteria and therefore sales are restricted in the country.

According to the report, Apple only sold 3,000 iPhones in Argentina before government restrictions were put in place in March 2011, selling 30,000 in 2010. Leer más “Apple fans in Argentina face an uncertain wait for the iPhone”

El iPad tiene un impacto inmediato en las ganancias de Apple

El iPad ha conseguido un impacto importante en las ganancias que ha hecho Apple hasta la fecha. No hay duda que el iPad vino a estremecer el mercado de los dispositivos electrónicos, y con esta nueva gráfica de ganancias de Apple se ve reflejado.


Autor: Gaby MC

El iPad ha conseguido un impacto importante en las ganancias que ha hecho Apple hasta la fecha. No hay duda que el iPad vino a estremecer el mercado de los dispositivos electrónicos, y con esta nueva gráfica de ganancias de Apple se ve reflejado.

Grafica de ganancias de Apple en Billones

Sillicon Alley fue el encargado de desarrollar esta gráfica de las ganancias de Apple generadas a partir de Septiembre de 2007, con diversos de sus productos como el iPhone, Mac, iPod, iTunes, programas y por último el nuevo iPad.

Estas ganancias se calcularon en billones de dólares, así que gracias a esta gráfica pueden comprender las ganancias que a generado Apple desde el 2007, que van en aumento cada que lanzaba un nuevo producto, sistema o servicio, según reportan en businessinsider. Leer más “El iPad tiene un impacto inmediato en las ganancias de Apple”

Antennas: Jobs Was Right. They’re Still a Challenge

For most of today’s basic voice and data cell signals, the right antenna length is about three inches or seven inches. FM radio and broadcast TV antennas are longer, though antennas can be bent to fit inside tiny phones. The optimal length is half the frequency the antenna is designed to receive divided by the speed of light. Any longer or shorter, and the reception can suffer. Furthermore, “the [human] body has a major effect on the antenna because at different frequencies it acts differently,” says Stuart Lipoff, an electronics consultant.


Image representing Steve Jobs as depicted in C...
Image via CrunchBase

As phones continue to shrink, fitting antennas in and making them work correctly often comes down to trial and error

By Amy Thomson

Whatever you think of Steve Jobs‘ defense of the iPhone 4 and its reception issues, the Apple (AAPL) boss was right about one thing: Antennas are a technological challenge, one that engineers have wrestled with since before Gordon Gekko barked orders into his Motorola (MOT) DynaTAC from a beach in the Hamptons. And as phones continue to shrink, fitting antennas in and making them work correctly often comes down to trial and error, says Stephen Temple, a retired engineer who helped plan Europe’s GSM technology. “It would be fair to say that antenna design is a little bit of a dark art,” Temple says. Leer más “Antennas: Jobs Was Right. They’re Still a Challenge”

Real-world testing: iPhone 4 vs. HTC EVO 4G

Our writer spent a few weeks with the Apple iPhone 4 and the HTC EVO 4G. Which came out ahead?
By Mitch Wagner

Computerworld – I’ve been using an iPhone for three years now, first the original iPhone then the 3G. I like the iPhone a lot — but I’m not married to it. When I began hearing great things about the Sprint’s Android phone, the HTC EVO 4G, I thought hard about switching. And although I eventually decided to upgrade to the iPhone 4, I was curious what I was missing.

The good people at Sprint let me borrow an EVO for a few weeks, and I compared it to my personal iPhone 4. I found that there were a lot of factors where one phone excelled over the other — but that, in the end, it was hard to choose between them.

What follows are my observations about how the two phones compared in a variety of aspects. In each case, I’ve chosen the phone I think is the winner in each category — when there was a winner.

Note: The EVO I tested ran Android OS 2.1, but the next version of Android, version 2.2 or “Froyo,” is due any day now. Froyo is a major upgrade — but many of the new features are interesting only to developers, and others are already available on the EVO, including wireless tethering and Flash support.

According to all reports, Froyo performs faster than Android 2.1, but even using Android 2.1, I didn’t find performance to be a problem.


Our writer spent a few weeks with the Apple iPhone 4 and the HTC EVO 4G. Which came out ahead?

By Mitch Wagner

Computerworld – I’ve been using an iPhone for three years now, first the original iPhone then the 3G. I like the iPhone a lot — but I’m not married to it. When I began hearing great things about the Sprint’s Android phone, the HTC EVO 4G, I thought hard about switching. And although I eventually decided to upgrade to the iPhone 4, I was curious what I was missing.

The good people at Sprint let me borrow an EVO for a few weeks, and I compared it to my personal iPhone 4. I found that there were a lot of factors where one phone excelled over the other — but that, in the end, it was hard to choose between them.

What follows are my observations about how the two phones compared in a variety of aspects. In each case, I’ve chosen the phone I think is the winner in each category — when there was a winner.

Note: The EVO I tested ran Android OS 2.1, but the next version of Android, version 2.2 or “Froyo,” is due any day now. Froyo is a major upgrade — but many of the new features are interesting only to developers, and others are already available on the EVO, including wireless tethering and Flash support.
According to all reports, Froyo performs faster than Android 2.1, but even using Android 2.1, I didn’t find performance to be a problem. Leer más “Real-world testing: iPhone 4 vs. HTC EVO 4G”