Creating Innovation Value: Four Key Drivers to Success | innovationmanagement.se


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The ability to increase business value through innovation is a critical success driver for most organizations. The markets that we operate in provide both opportunity and risk from an innovation perspective as they are rapidly changing. This article takes a look at a useful framework; The Innovation Diamond™, that examines the complexity and addresses some of the challenges in product innovation.

Markets provide opportunities if we get it right and threats if we do not, particularly given the intense competitive nature of most industries.  Our quest to realize innovation results is further complicated by the complexities involved for most firms – the sheer number of players to potentially coordinate with in the value chain; rising costs; margin erosion; increasing regulatory, customer and consumer demands; evolving business models; shorter cycle times; and new sources of competition, just to name a few.

The good news is that if you can get it right, you stand to gain a competitive advantage and will reap the benefits of increased revenue and profits.     

The good news is that if you can get it right, you stand to gain a competitive advantage and will reap the benefits of increased revenue and profits. Hence, the lure of identifying new growth opportunities, increasing volumes and market share, securing a competitive advantage, improving margins and strengthening brand loyalty, provides a powerful incentive to be successful at product innovation. However, the challenges that organizations face do not make this easy. Developing new products and technologies is consequently one of the more complicated initiatives an organization can undertake.

Take for example the telecom market wars occurring over the past year. Samsung and Apple have emerged as two clear winners that have been able to leverage powerful innovation machines. The competition (Nokia and Research in Motion) have stumbled badly in their respective innovation capabilities and ultimately paid the price in the marketplace.

A useful framework to help achieve better results from product innovation efforts Leer más “Creating Innovation Value: Four Key Drivers to Success | innovationmanagement.se”

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Revisiting the Idea of a Fully Formed Idea | innovationmanagement.se


What elements comprise a fully formed idea? How might originators capture the evolution in their thinking about their ideas over time? Innovation architect Doug Collins—older and, debatably, wiser—revisits his thinking on this subject.

Many groups coin abbreviations and acronyms as ways to help them decide what to do. Project managers use the SMART mnemonic to set program goals: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time-sensitive. Pediatricians use the Apgar score to help them assess the health of newborns: Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration.

People who practice collaborative innovation have their own shorthand, as well. For idea capture they use OIA: observation, implication, and application. Chris Miller, who founded innovation consultancy Innovation Focus, developed this approach as part of his Hunting for Hunting grounds method, through which participants identify new opportunities for growth. I explored the OIA approach’s use in collaborative innovation in an earlier article. An example of OIA follows (figure 1).

Figure 1: example of OIA

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

OIA enables originators to capture and share fully formed ideas such that their fellow community members and stakeholders have enough information to comment, assess, and decide next steps. I have found, too, in working with clients that OIA offers further benefits beyond enabling people to capture their ideas in full… Leer más “Revisiting the Idea of a Fully Formed Idea | innovationmanagement.se”

Top Six Components of a Creative Climate | innovationmanagement.se


 

Are you thinking about ways to transform your workplace into an environment more conducive to innovation? This article takes a closer look at six components of creative climates that have shown to be significant at facilitating creativity according to new research.

This article will continue investigating creative climates with the goal of identifying the most substantial components that facilitates creativity.

What is a creative climate?

A climate can be seen as various aspects of the psychological atmosphere in a team and the surrounding organizational environment. The climate often conveys expectations about which behaviors and attitudes that are acceptable. In the creativity research field there has been many attempts to conceptualize the idea of a ‘creative’ climate – i.e. such a climate that facilitates outcomes that are creative. Examples of such conceptualizations are the Team Climate Inventory by Anderson & West (1996), the Creative Climate Questionnaire by Ekvall (1996) and the KEYS by Amabile et al. (1996).

Many components of a creative climate have been proposed during the years. Some examples are the degree of individual freedom, psychological safety, support and positive relationships among team members, vision provided by supervisors, creative encouragement, mission clarity, available resources, and even joy (Denti, 2011).

The search for significant components of a creative climate

For this article I want to highlight six components of a creative climate that have been shown to be among the most salient in predicting creative and innovative outcomes. To identify these components, I have scrutinized two recent meta-analytic studies on factors that influence creativity and innovation (Hülsheger, Anderson & Salgado, 2009, and Hunter, Bedell & Mumford, 2007). Meta analytic studies have the best ability to detect effects across multiple settings since they combine the results from a large amount of studies¹. The factors are presented in no particular order…   Leer más “Top Six Components of a Creative Climate | innovationmanagement.se”

The Promise of Innovation Management Standardization | innovationmanagement.se


 

Previously in the Standardization Series, we argued that the worth of a management standard addressing innovation will chiefly rest on its ability to provide guidance on how to achieve sustained success through new product, service or business model development. But how will this “guidance” be generally received and which are the key drivers for the adoption of innovation management standards? The following article explains.

Much like the practice of innovation, the process of standardization too has been with us for quite some time. In terms of management system standards, one of the most successful applications to date is seen in Quality Management (QM), where the famous ISO 9001 has generated over 1 million certifications worldwide over the past decade.

Whether a standard in Innovation Management (IM) will follow the same trend is certainly a question of credibility and especially time. One frequent dilemma is whether QM accounts for the systematic part of innovation. Why does one need a separate IM system to guide this part?stakeholders frequently ask, signaling a potential contact area that needs to be explored further. KTH Royal Institute of Technology for example, is currently in the process of establishing a project that will take a closer look at this parallel and attempt to shed some light from different perspectives.

What is an Innovation Management System

 “a set of interrelated or interacting elements of an organization to establish innovation policies and objectives, and processes to achieve those objectives” [CEN/TC 389 N 106, 2012]

Finally, whereas QM standardization has reached maturity, IM is still in an early phase. For practitioners to engage and acknowledge the usefulness of an innovation management standard, benefits need to be clear, and deliverables need to be at hand. Yet as of today, IM standardization is moving from an inception to an elaboration phase, with the first document finalized (a “Technical Specification” in standardization language) and scheduled for publication in mid-2013.

Key drivers for innovation management standards adoption

With an official document under way, it is equally important to cast a critical eye upon the complex dynamics and drivers that will influence the adoption of innovation management standards.

Diver #1 –organizational pull >>>      Leer más “The Promise of Innovation Management Standardization | innovationmanagement.se”