The Value Elevator Speech for your Innovation | innovationexcellence.com


The Value Elevator Speech for your Innovationby Stephan Liozu

Are you able to clearly articulate the value proposition for your innovation, your business model, or your startup? Can you recite in one quick minute this value proposition and two to three value drivers that illustrate its power and monetized differential value? If you are a business leaders in the trenches, a multi-tasking entrepreneur or a busy innovator, chances are that you have not gone through the exercise and are not ready for it.

I was recently participating in a top management conversation at a fairly large high tech start up and I asked leaders around the room if they were able to articulate the business model value proposition and their critical value drivers. The question took them by surprise and generated some interesting internal discussions. I was invited to speak with them about their potential pricing problems but we quickly realized that the problem resided in the business model fundamentals and the overall value proposition. The conversation uncovered internal disagreements, some frustration among the various executives, and a real need to take a step back and reflect.

Case closed! How can one have a creative and constructive discussion on pricing models without have a clear idea of what your innovative business model is all about and what types of differentiating features you bring to your customers? This is fundamental exercise that every marketing manager, business manager, innovator,  and entrepreneur should go through to create a crisp value story that will create excitement and interest for customer, investors and partners.

There are three critical elements to work as shown in the figure below.

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The Strategic Diamonds of Firms – Kaizen and Innovation


The Strategic Diamonds of Firms - Kaizen and Innovationinnovationexcellence.com

Nowadays firms can choose from several types of strategies, according to the vision of its managers and leaders, and according to the market in which the organization operates. However, in this article we distinguish two large Strategic Diamonds: Kaizen and Innovation.

Kaizen or Continuous Improvement, is a Japanese term well known and applied by many companies. This is part of Operational Excellence, whose main aim is focused in reduce operating costs, improve processes and working within a permanent culture of improvement. The fist Strategic Diamond we can understand with The Shingo Prize, a standard model for ”create excellence in organizations through the application of universally accepted principles of operational excellence, alignment of management systems and the wise application of improvement techniques”.

The Shingo Model has two elements: the house and the Diamond. The house details the principles of operational excellence and the power of balancing efforts across all the dimensions, while the Diamond represents thetransformation process for embedding the principles of operational excellence into the organizational culture. Leer más “The Strategic Diamonds of Firms – Kaizen and Innovation”

Is there a Model for Rapid Innovation?

The duration of innovation can vary from one sector to another. In the digital sphere, it’s a matter of weeks or months. In the car industry, we’re talking of years and in the pharmaceutical industry, of decades. Each industry must update its innovation processes according to its own identity and goals. For the drug industry, rather than speeding up innovation, the issue could be to innovate deeply on parallel fronts and renovate the patent stock.

Research needs its own time; nonetheless, innovation can accelerate once a new technology is about to arrive. And yet, the issue of fast innovation is far from resolved.

Abundant innovation and dedicated structures

The professional thesis I wrote at HEC Paris led me to review the academic sources and innovation models from over 15 different companies. I differentiated three main archetypes.

Abundant Innovation


by Nicolas Bry | innovationexcellence.com

I naturally encompass innovation as the result of constant knowledge exchanges between technology, the markets, an innovation team, as well as other departments of the firm.

As the bigger you are, the more difficult it is to share active knowledge, how can we set-up a so-called “knowledge creating company” and speed up knowledge exchanges within big companies?

In this speech at Management School, L’Ecole de Paris, I suggest  creating small dedicated and agile structuresled by innovation professionals with specific management methods reffered all together as “creative tension“. Then the question becomes: how to insert their work and align with group innovation strategies?

Moving fom linear to interactions model

In the 1950s, innovation management could be described in a linear way: new ideas were given to R&D and transformed into products and services; these were then transferred to the marketing and eventually to the distribution departments. Today, this chain of events has fallen apart. Instead, the identity of innovation has been gradually shaped by multiple interactions between different levels of a company with other external entities.

Innovation identity is the fruit of exchanges of knowledge between sciences, technology, the market, the team in charge of innovation and other departments of the company.

Why fast innovation…? Leer más “Is there a Model for Rapid Innovation?”

Business Strategy Innovation Diamond (BSID)

Continuing my quest to surface some classics that the Innovation Excellence audience will have never seen, here is another from 2007:

I would like to introduce a visual metaphor that the consultants use at Business Strategy Innovation. It’s called, predictably enough, the Business Strategy Innovation Diamond, or the BSID. There is another reason we use it, to “ID” the “BS” in an organization. Now a lot of people would represent strategy as the top of a pyramid, processes in the middle, and systems as the base of a pyramid, but that ignores two of the most important tools in any organization – policies and reporting. Business Strategy Innovation instead starts with a diamond that looks like this: The BSID focuses your organization on making sure that the policies support the strategy, that the processes facilitate the policies, that the systems enable the processes, and the reporting measures the execution of the strategy. Not focusing on the BSID, may result in just BS instead of strategic innovation.


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by Braden Kelley

Continuing my quest to surface some classics that the Innovation Excellence audience will have never seen, here is another from 2007:I would like to introduce a visual metaphor that the consultants use at Business Strategy Innovation. It’s called, predictably enough, the Business Strategy Innovation Diamond, or the BSID. There is another reason we use it, to “ID” the “BS” in an organization. Now a lot of people would represent strategy as the top of a pyramid, processes in the middle, and systems as the base of a pyramid, but that ignores two of the most important tools in any organization – policies and reporting. Business Strategy Innovation instead starts with a diamond that looks like this:

Business Strategy Innovation Diamond

Here is an example of how the Business Strategy Innovation Diamond can help you structure an organizational analysis project: Leer más “Business Strategy Innovation Diamond (BSID)”

How Apple Changed the Smartphone World

In fact, it was iconic before it was released. This is yet another trick up Apple’s stylish sleeve and one that works tremendously well. People place bets on what they think the company will do next, and hundreds – if not thousands – of blogs are dedicated to following their every move. In 2007, things weren’t so very different. The company said nothing of the iPhone’s release, but leaks, rumours and red herrings abounded on the internet. Our appetites were whetted, and we were desperate for a slice of the pie.


How Apple Changed the Smartphone WorldThe name Apple is synonymous with innovation. Long has the Silicon Valley giant brought childlike excitement into the tech industry, thanks largely to the vision of its late CEO, Steve Jobs. Remember the launch of the Apple II? We don’t either, but it was one of their crucial first steps towards greatness.

Arguably though, Apple’s greatest achievement came in 2007, when the company flipped the smartphone world upside down and back to front with the launch of the very first iPhone.

It changed everything.

Apple said, ‘Forget everything you know about smartphones’ – and we did. Of course, back then we still used our mobiles to call friends, play games, listen to music and access the internet. But the iPhone did something different. It took the normal functions of a phone and made them fun. It made them stylish and artistic, yet simple and minimalist.

‘No keyboards here!’ Apple boldly proclaimed. No, the screen was the phone. Software took centre stage, and the beautiful interface asked us to use gestures to navigate. We were asked to pinch, zoom and pan, using truly revolutionary controls. And after the excitement of scrolling wore off, there was the App Store to keep us engaged. For the first time ever, we had a simple way to browse, purchase and download apps. Amongst these apps were a few games – games controlled (could it possibly be true?!) by moving the phone itself. We shuffled our songs with a shake, and drove fast cars on the tube.

‘How much is this thing?’ we asked. ‘Affordable’ was the answer. Apple don’t create shoddy products and then ask you to cough up a fortune – they create amazing products, and ask you to pay what they’re worth. Which is quite a lot, admittedly.

Yes, the iPhone became iconic for many reasons. Leer más “How Apple Changed the Smartphone World”

Reflections on Open Innovation and Intellectual Property

Intellectual property rights (IPR) used to be the key topic at open innovation conferences a few years back. Although still an important topic, this is no longer the case as companies mature on open innovation and find ways to solve these issues.

This development led me to downplay the significance of IPR when it comes to open innovation. Maybe I went a bit too far on this. I am reflecting on this after a session in my Danish network group in which we had a great visit by Jørn Vestergaard-Jensen, a Danish lawyer with good insights on IPR issues for open innovation.

Here I share some of the insights gained and reflections made by myself and the other participants.


by Stefan Lindegaard
http://www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/2011/12/10/reflections-on-open-innovation-and-intellectual-property/

Reflections on Open Innovation and Intellectual PropertyIntellectual property rights (IPR) used to be the key topic at open innovation conferences a few years back. Although still an important topic, this is no longer the case as companies mature on open innovation and find ways to solve these issues.

This development led me to downplay the significance of IPR when it comes to open innovation. Maybe I went a bit too far on this. I am reflecting on this after a session in my Danish network group in which we had a great visit by Jørn Vestergaard-Jensen, a Danish lawyer with good insights on IPR issues for open innovation.

Here I share some of the insights gained and reflections made by myself and the other participants.

Business Before Legal

I was glad to hear that Vestergaard-Jensen had a business mindset. One of his key points was that the business case should take lead over legal issues, not the other way around. He also said that in his world – the lawyer community – good/skilled people have this mindset implicating that less skilled people might focus on reducing risks rather than seeing opportunities in open innovation. I suspect we could agree that there are less good/skilled people than the opposite…

Don’t Be Too Naive

We had an interesting discussion on how “naïve” you can afford to be in open innovation partnerships. Many people in the Nordic region (myself included) take pride in our fairly open and trusting approach in which we believe in the best of people and do not always see reasons to be suspicious and thus protect yourself legally. Some cultures – probably led by the US – have a different mindset on this.

I still believe that the open minded approach is the best in the long run as innovation is moving from a more transactional to a relationship-based approach, but the discussion did prompt several of the participants to consider whether their approach to legal protection should be adjusted. Leer más “Reflections on Open Innovation and Intellectual Property”