Disruptions: With No Revenue, an Illusion of Value


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The gears of Silicon Valley continue to mesh and turn because of money, not necessarily technological innovations. And there are certain things about that money machine that denizens of the Valley would rather keep quiet.

First, they’ll never acknowledge the possibility of a bubble. “Bubble? Ha!” venture capitalists often tell me. “Silly reporter, there is no bubble.”

O.K., I get this spin. It makes sense from an investor’s point of view. Acknowledging any possibility that tech companies aren’t worth what you say they are worth would be followed by the sound of a giant pop, and the money and investments would dry up. The machine could grind to a halt.

Yet an even more bizarre activity in the Valley than shushing the talk of a bubble is how some start-ups are advised by investors not to make money. This concept might sound ridiculous from a business standpoint, but for investors, it fuels the get-richer-quicker mentality that exists here.

“It serves the interest of the investors who can come up with whatever valuation they want when there are no revenues,” explained Paul Kedrosky, a venture investor and entrepreneur. “Once there is no revenue, there is no science, and it all just becomes finger in the wind valuations.”

When small start-ups I’ve spoken with do make money, they often find it difficult to recruit additional investment because most venture capitalists — and often the entrepreneurs they finance — are not interested in building viable long-term businesses. Rather, they’re interested in pumping up enough hype and valuation to find a quick exit through an acquisition at an eye-popping premium.

Getting acquired while producing no revenue is like performing a card trick without the deck of cards: the magician simply explains how magical the trick is, never actually showing it. (And we are supposed to step back in sheer awe.)

For start-ups, fewer numbers in the equation mean a projected valuation of a start-up can be plucked out of thin air.

Look how well this worked for Instagram, which had $0 in revenue and was purchased for $1 billion. Leer más “Disruptions: With No Revenue, an Illusion of Value”

Web 2.0 Is Over, All Hail the Age of Mobile


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When they look back at this era, Internet historians will mark Facebook’s Instagram acquisition as the symbolic moment when the Great Shift was confirmed. Significantly, it also came soon after Steve Jobs’ death. The device that Jobs created had, within the space of five years, allowed a 551-day-old company with 14 employees to become worth $1 billion.

On April 9, 2012, Web 2.0 lost its mantle as the most important Internet paradigm. We are now starting the Age of Mobile. Google and Facebook’s Internet dominance is no longer guaranteed. They face a threat from below and an army of smartphone-touting masses that sees little distinction between the piece of hardware in their hands and the Internet world it opens up.

The momentum has been shifting for a while, but now the trend is emphatic. People now spend more time in mobile apps than they do online. There are more than 500 million Android and iOS devices on the market, and giant countries like China and Indonesia are only just getting started in their smartphone and tablet push. Global mobile 3G subscribers are growing at over 35 percent, year on year, and there’s a lot more room to move – there are 5.6 billion mobile subscribers on our fair planet. Even in developing countries, cheap smartphones will soon rush into the market. And who here doesn’t think tablet sales are going to go gangbusters pretty much everywhere?

This is a new phenomenon. Steve Jobs brought the first iPhone into the world in 2007. Android soon followed. The iPad is only two years old. Google, on the other hand, has been around for 14 years. Facebook: eight. They’re veritable geriatrics. And that’s why they’re behind on mobile.

They know this much themselves, and they’re worried. Just look at Facebook’s S-1 filing. After noting that it has more than 425 million users who accessed the social network via mobile in December 2011, Facebook noted [my emphasis]: Leer más “Web 2.0 Is Over, All Hail the Age of Mobile”

Researchers identify wild orgy gene


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Ménage à trois? Wild orgies? One night stands? Who says science can’t be sexy?

Certainly not Binghamton University researchers, who are hard at work uncovering the sultry secrets behind human sexual behavior.

The team – led by Dr. Justin Garcia – recently identified a dopamine receptor gene known as DRD4 that is purportedly linked to chronic infidelity and “uncommitted” one-night stands.

And wouldn’t you know it?

The very same gene has already been linked to alcoholism, gambling addiction and a predilection for really bad horror movies.

Oddly enough, another study claimed the mysterious gene was responsible for political liberalism, along with “openness” to new social situations.

“What we found was that individuals with a certain variant of the DRD4 gene were more likely to have a history of uncommitted sex, including one-night stands and acts of infidelity,” Garcia confirmed. Leer más “Researchers identify wild orgy gene”

Familia y Cole


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Hace aproximadamente algo más de diez años, eran muy pocos los que disponían de teléfono móvil o celular. Muchos hemos vivido la mayoría de nuestra vida sin móvil, hoy no podemos vivir sin él. La extensión de este aparato es imparable y cada día surgen nuevas posibilidades de comunicación, de mensajería… el proceso de expansión cada vez va a más. Pero me cuestiono: ¿ha mejorado nuestra comunicación? Sin duda que ha aumentado la cantidad, ¿pero son nuestras comunicaciones de calidad? En una serie de entradas que iré publicando quiero compartir mi reflexión sobre el tema y los retos que a la familia y profesionales de la educación plantea.

Algunas escenas
En este primer artículo me voy a centrar en algunas escenas que suelo contemplar relacionadas con el uso del móvil. Leer más “Familia y Cole”

Happy Hunting: How a Smile Can Help You Get a Job


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Though it’s natural to feel down while searching for a job after a layoff, a new study shows just how critical it is to keep your spirits up.

The research reveals that maintaining a more positive and motivational outlook can have a positive effect on the job pursuit.

That’s especially true at the outset of the search, but the ability to stay energized and keep negative emotions in check is even more critical as the hunt drags on, the research shows.

The study, involving 177 unemployed people looking for work, conducted weekly assessments of self-management, job search status and mental health. At the beginning of the study, the participants spent an average of 17 hours per week looking for a job and reported a gradual improvement in their mental health. By the fourth month, however, time spent on the search had declined to 14 hours per week, and mental health began to decline.

“These findings show that the self-management strategies that people actually use make the key difference,” said study co-author Ruth Kanfer, a psychology professor at Georgia Tech.

[10 Personality Types Likely to Get Hired] Leer más “Happy Hunting: How a Smile Can Help You Get a Job”

TechCrunch | The Future of Science


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Editor’s note: This guest post was written by Richard Price, founder and CEO of Academia.edu — a site that serves as a platform for academics to share their research papers and to interact with each other.

Almost every technological and medical innovation in the world has its roots in a scientific paper. Science drives much of the world’s innovation. The faster science moves, the faster the world moves.

Progress in science right now is being held back by two key inefficiencies:

The time-lag problem: there is a time-lag of, on average, 12 months between finishing a paper, and it being published.
The single mode of publication problem: scientists share their ideas only via one format, the scientific paper, and don’t take advantage of the full range of media that the web makes possible.
The stakes are high. If these inefficiencies can be removed, science would accelerate tremendously. A faster science would lead to faster innovation in medicine and technology. Cancer could be cured 2-3 years sooner than it otherwise would be, which would save millions of lives. Leer más “TechCrunch | The Future of Science”

Disruptions: With No Revenue, an Illusion of Value


See on Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

The gears of Silicon Valley continue to mesh and turn because of money, not necessarily technological innovations. And there are certain things about that money machine that denizens of the Valley would rather keep quiet.

First, they’ll never acknowledge the possibility of a bubble. “Bubble? Ha!” venture capitalists often tell me. “Silly reporter, there is no bubble.”

O.K., I get this spin. It makes sense from an investor’s point of view. Acknowledging any possibility that tech companies aren’t worth what you say they are worth would be followed by the sound of a giant pop, and the money and investments would dry up. The machine could grind to a halt.

Yet an even more bizarre activity in the Valley than shushing the talk of a bubble is how some start-ups are advised by investors not to make money. This concept might sound ridiculous from a business standpoint, but for investors, it fuels the get-richer-quicker mentality that exists here.

“It serves the interest of the investors who can come up with whatever valuation they want when there are no revenues,” explained Paul Kedrosky, a venture investor and entrepreneur. “Once there is no revenue, there is no science, and it all just becomes finger in the wind valuations.”

When small start-ups I’ve spoken with do make money, they often find it difficult to recruit additional investment because most venture capitalists — and often the entrepreneurs they finance — are not interested in building viable long-term businesses. Rather, they’re interested in pumping up enough hype and valuation to find a quick exit through an acquisition at an eye-popping premium.

Getting acquired while producing no revenue is like performing a card trick without the deck of cards: the magician simply explains how magical the trick is, never actually showing it. (And we are supposed to step back in sheer awe.)

For start-ups, fewer numbers in the equation mean a projected valuation of a start-up can be plucked out of thin air. Leer más “Disruptions: With No Revenue, an Illusion of Value”