Ads from a Consumer’s Perspective

We all know that cars, especially new ones, are big ticket items. Now I see why Auto is usually the largest spending category. I understand the importance of good creative in advertising and I also understand why putting in an offer is also important. As a marketer I’ve learned that when you are a consumer you want to see an offer, you want as much information as possible – I will definitely keep this in mind when I am putting together media plans moving forward.

I watch every auto ad and I don’t care if they are placed right next to each other. I watch them differently than I did before I was considering buying a car.


http://www.dontdrinkthekoolaidblog.com/
by Meredith

I recently went to the San Diego Auto Show and it was awesome!  I remember my dad dragging me along to the Los Angeles Auto Shows as a kid.  Aside from the time I got to spend with him, I never had an interest in any of the cars or what was going on. 

The San Diego Auto Show changed my mind.

My car is 9 years old now and I’m starting to think – maybe I should get a new car?  I definitely have a couple of years left on my 2003 eclipse, if I want them.  But seeing all the new cars made me seriously think about making a purchase. Leer más “Ads from a Consumer’s Perspective”

Secrets to Phone Pitching

There are times when a pitch is so straight forward that a succinct email to the right person warrants an immediate response. An interview is set, images are sent and a placement is made. Done.
But more often than not, it’s not that easy.

Usually, a pitch that’s going to warrant a great in-depth story is going to require a great, in-depth pitch and email just isn’t always the way to go. So when email isn’t cutting it, here are a few tips I’ve learned to help garner results by phone.

First ask yourself this: Is a phone conversation even going to do it? If not, then ask the media person to drinks, coffee, lunch, or a deskside appointment. Face-to-face time is wildly more valuable and wildly more productive. Just recently, Katie Levien and I set up a meeting with the new editor of San Diego’s Downtown News. The result was an ongoing series dedicated solely to our client, Seaport Village, highlighting a different tenant each month. Had we requested that by email, she may have thought us absurd but our face-to-face conversation led us to this great result.


Lizzie | http://www.dontdrinkthekoolaidblog.com/

There are times when a pitch is so straight forward that a succinct email to the right person warrants an immediate response. An interview is set, images are sent and a placement is made. Done.

But more often than not, it’s not that easy.

Usually, a pitch that’s going to warrant a great in-depth story is going to require a great, in-depth pitch and email just isn’t always the way to go. So when email isn’t cutting it, here are a few tips I’ve learned to help garner results by phone.

First ask yourself this: Is a phone conversation even going to do it? If not, then ask the media person to drinks, coffee, lunch, or a deskside appointment. Face-to-face time is wildly more valuable and wildly more productive. Just recently, Katie Levien and I set up a meeting with the new editor of San Diego’s Downtown News. The result was an ongoing series dedicated solely to our client, Seaport Village, highlighting a different tenant each month. Had we requested that by email, she may have thought us absurd but our face-to-face conversation led us to this great result.

If a phone call will do, make your call wisely. Is your list of media to call seven pages long? Treat those seven pages one call at a time.  Research the pub and the person to make sure you have a fit and that you know just the way to propose it to the person on the other end.

PR secrets to phone pitching

Then when you do pick up the phone keep the following tips in mind: Leer más “Secrets to Phone Pitching”

Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company

Types of Facebook Deals:

Individual Facebook Deal – To claim this type of deal, users need to only check into a venue once. When the user checks in, they click “Claim Deal,” which changes their phone screen to say, “Show phone screen at register to redeem.” Any venue offering these giveaways should be sure that the staff is well-versed on how to fulfill the deal.

The individual deal is best for venues looking to attract new visitors. Each time a person redeems a deal, it’s posted to his/her Facebook wall, making your venue front and center for his/her 100-1,000 friends.

What to be aware of: Deals are new for most users, so messaging and staff training are a necessity. Also, a major challenge for new users of Facebook check-ins is that instead of waiting for their phone to auto-populate with nearby locations, they have the option to create their own venue if they can’t find yours. If they make their own, they’ll never see your official location or your deal.


At the dismay of my friends that are not engulfed in social media, I’ve been doing quite a bit of research into LBS programs and what works and doesn’t work with each one. For the past month, I’ve been looking into Facebook Places, more specifically its new Deals program.

If you’re not up to speed, Facebook enables companies to claim their venue so when smart phone users check-in, the location is tied back to the official Facebook page (see The San Diego Museum of Art for example).

Once a company has claimed its venue, the admin of the official page can create a Facebook Deal. The challenge of marketers is to decide “which type of deal is right for my brand?” I’ve come to find there are some loopholes in some of the deals that marketers should be aware of before deciding. Leer más “Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company”

What New PR Pros Need to Know

One of my favorite things about my job is coordinating the BG PR internship program. As I search for our newest intern, it got me thinking about what new pros, college graduates and students vying for an internship need to know. I even asked some of my Twitter friends and mentors (in 140 characters) for advice to share with you.

Here were some common themes:

Integration is where it’s at- When I received a tweet from Deirdre Breakenridge (@dbreakenridge ) offering her advice to new pros, I knew I had hit social media gold. The author of “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations” and an adjunct professor, Deirdre said, “Grads should know that communications can’t work in a vacuum. It’s very important to be hybrid working with other marketing disciplines. And, in order to educate our brands we must be embracing social media, staying on top of technology and constantly educating ourselves.” I couldn’t have said it better myself.


Erika | dontdrinkthekoolaidblog.com

One of my favorite things about my job is coordinating the BG PR internship program. As I search for our newest intern, it got me thinking about what new pros, college graduates and students vying for an internship need to know. I even asked some of my Twitter friends and mentors (in 140 characters) for advice to share with you.

Here were some common themes:

Integration is where it’s at– When I received a tweet from Deirdre Breakenridge (@dbreakenridge ) offering her advice to new pros, I knew I had hit social media gold. The author of “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations” and an adjunct professor, Deirdre said, “Grads should know that communications can’t work in a vacuum. It’s very important to be hybrid working with other marketing disciplines. And, in order to educate our brands we must be embracing social media, staying on top of technology and constantly educating ourselves.” I couldn’t have said it better myself. Leer más “What New PR Pros Need to Know”

Do Loyalty Programs Really Work?

We have a saying in our family: “Going broke saving money.” The philosophy of a traditional reward program is simple: reward customers for their purchases thus encouraging future purchases (and hopefully an increase in spending). As a marketer I’m a fan of loyalty programs and as a consumer I love receiving my free drink from Starbucks every couple of weeks (I need to purchase 15 drinks to get a free drink. You do the math.) But as my interactions with brands move away from offline engagement and move toward Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, etc., I’m starting to evaluate the effectiveness of the traditional loyalty program. Do loyalty programs really work? Apparently Mason Thelen from BrandWeek is asking this same question.


We have a saying in our family: “Going broke saving money.” The philosophy of a traditional reward program is simple: reward customers for their purchases thus encouraging future purchases (and hopefully an increase in spending).  As a marketer I’m a fan of loyalty programs and as a consumer I love receiving my free drink from Starbucks every couple of weeks (I need to purchase 15 drinks to get a free drink. You do the math.) But as my interactions with brands move away from offline engagement and move toward Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, etc., I’m starting to evaluate the effectiveness of the traditional loyalty program. Do loyalty programs really work? Apparently Mason Thelen from BrandWeek is asking this same question. Leer más “Do Loyalty Programs Really Work?”

Do Loyalty Programs Really Work?

We have a saying in our family: “Going broke saving money.” The philosophy of a traditional reward program is simple: reward customers for their purchases thus encouraging future purchases (and hopefully an increase in spending). As a marketer I’m a fan of loyalty programs and as a consumer I love receiving my free drink from Starbucks every couple of weeks (I need to purchase 15 drinks to get a free drink. You do the math.) But as my interactions with brands move away from offline engagement and move toward Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, etc., I’m starting to evaluate the effectiveness of the traditional loyalty program. Do loyalty programs really work? Apparently Mason Thelen from BrandWeek is asking this same question.


Via: http://www.dontdrinkthekoolaidblog.com/

We have a saying in our family: “Going broke saving money.” The philosophy of a traditional reward program is simple: reward customers for their purchases thus encouraging future purchases (and hopefully an increase in spending).  As a marketer I’m a fan of loyalty programs and as a consumer I love receiving my free drink from Starbucks every couple of weeks (I need to purchase 15 drinks to get a free drink. You do the math.) But as my interactions with brands move away from offline engagement and move toward Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, etc., I’m starting to evaluate the effectiveness of the traditional loyalty program. Do loyalty programs really work? Apparently Mason Thelen from BrandWeek is asking this same question. Leer más “Do Loyalty Programs Really Work?”

15 Insights from 15 Years – Notes from a PR and Ad Agency Survivor

This year marks Bailey Gardiner’s 15th year. Recently, I’ve been spending some time reflecting on what I have learned about agency life during that time. Yes folks, it’s time to tear back the onion peel and look a bit more deeply into this world of “integrated communications” and agency life. For some of you, this will be an affirmation of what you live. For others it will be a glimpse into a business that is quite unlike what many of you call “work” each day. It isn’t a whole lot like Mad Men portrays it to be (except for the drinking), but it’s sure been a great ride for us.


This year marks Bailey Gardiner’s 15th year. Recently, I’ve been spending some time reflecting on what I have learned about agency life during that time. Yes folks, it’s time to tear back the onion peel and look a bit more deeply into this world of “integrated communications” and agency life. For some of you, this will be an affirmation of what you live. For others it will be a glimpse into a business that is quite unlike what many of you call “work” each day. It isn’t a whole lot like Mad Men portrays it to be (except for the drinking), but it’s sure been a great ride for us.

1. Most people who start an agency are really good at one thing, and that thing is rarely running a business. From hyper-talented creative types to type-A account people (ahem), we rise through the ranks of our agencies and decide it’s time to start our own thing. So exciting. Look! We have clients. Wow! Our first office. Zikes! We’re winning awards. Wait, what? What do you mean I have to spend time on human resources, payroll, health care, legal contracts, the clogged kitchen sink? This industry needs to get better at training its rising stars to be managers and not just good fill-in-the-blanks.

2. People who have self-confidence in presentations will rise to the top. I’ve watched really talented people choke in presentations and it’s not pretty. Get good at it. Go to Toastmasters. Say yes to every presentation opportunity. I’ve also seen lots of people overcome their fear and go on to be outstanding presenters. It has definitely helped their careers. Leer más “15 Insights from 15 Years – Notes from a PR and Ad Agency Survivor”

Creating A Meaningful Marketing Message

Several weeks back we started a book club at Bailey Gardiner. No, we’re not looking to take Oprah’s place after her final season, but as an agency we like to stay on top of what’s going on in the world of marketing, advertising, PR and Social Media. That’s a lot for one person to do and since there are a lot of great reads out there, divide and share is what we are doing!

The Next Evolution of Marketing by Bob Gilbreath was the book I had the pleasure of reading. Bob Gilbreath is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Bridge Worldwide and has a extensive history in marketing on both the agency and client side. His book is broken into two basic sections with the first explaining what meaningful marketing is and the second sharing steps on how to create it. What is meaningful marketing you ask?


Several weeks back we started a book club at Bailey Gardiner.  No, we’re not looking to take Oprah’s place after her final season,  but as an agency we like to stay on top of what’s going on in the world of marketing, advertising, PR and Social Media.  That’s a lot for one person to do and since there are a lot of great reads out there,  divide and share is what we are doing!

The Next Evolution of Marketing by Bob Gilbreath was the book I had the pleasure of reading.  Bob Gilbreath is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Bridge Worldwide and has a extensive history in marketing on both the agency and client side.  His book is broken into two basic sections with the first explaining what meaningful marketing is and the second sharing steps on how to create it. What is meaningful marketing you ask?

There are two traits of marketing with meaning:

1.  It’s marketing that people choose to engage with. It involves creating something that people find is worthy of their time and attention, rather than continuing to look for ways to cleverly (or not so cleverly) interrupt them.

2. It’s marketing that itself improves people’s lives. Many marketers go to bed at night proud to support products and services that add value.  Indeed, they may remove tough stains, put a smile on faces, or enable priceless purchases but we too often utilize the old interruption approach to present these products and services to out customers.  Instead, we must create advertising that actually adds value, without necessarily forcing a sale.

The Hierarchy of Meaningful Marketing:

One of the parts in this book that resonated with me most, and brought me back to my high school days, was the Hierarchy of Meaningful Marketing and the connection Gilbreath bridged to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Solution Marketing: Like the lower levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, solution marketing covers basic household needs and benefits, for example, helpful offers, money savings and hard rewards for purchase.

Connection Marketing:  This represents a significant step toward building a bonding relationship between people and brands.  It matches closely with Maslow’s love/belonging category, providing benefits beyond the basics of information and relevance to include something that is of deeper importance in the consumer’s mind, i.e., social outlets and creative expression.

Achievement Marketing:  This corresponds to Maslow’s pinnacle of self-actualization by allowing people to significantly improve their lives, realize a dream, or positively change their community and their world. Leer más “Creating A Meaningful Marketing Message”