Three questions to ask your marketing team – Vía @ThisIsSethsBlog CC/ @danidron @smilatam


by Seth Godin
(or your business development team, your fundraising team or your pr folks)…

  • Who are you trying to reach?
  • Why do they decide to support us?
  • What do you need in order to make this happen more often?

The answer? + http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2013/09/three-questions-to-ask-your-marketing-team.html

 

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Seth Godin dejará de publicar libros tradicionales

Uno de los gurús más importantes del marketing y el panorama tecnológico a nivel mundial, Seth Godin, ha anunciado que dejará de publicar libros en papel. Después de haber escrito 12 libros, no cree que el esfuerzo que implica el proceso tradicional de publicación merezca la pena. Godin es autor de libros tan populares como “La vaca de color púrpura”.


Uno de los gurús más importantes del marketing y el panorama tecnológico a nivel mundial, Seth Godin, ha anunciado que dejará de publicar libros en papel. Después de haber escrito 12 libros, no cree que el esfuerzo que implica el proceso tradicional de publicación merezca la pena. Godin es autor de libros tan populares como “La vaca de color púrpura”.

Durante una entrevista con Mediabistro, Godin explicó que no le gusta “el largo periodo de espera, los filtros, el gran esfuerzo que se hace para el lanzamiento, obligar a la gente a que vaya a una tienda que generalmente no visita para comprar algo que habitualmente no compra, y hacerles pagar por una idea en un formato en el que es difícil de divulgarse”.

El experto asegura que todo ese esfuerzo no merece la pena, porque puede llegar a “10 o 50 veces más gente de manera electrónica”.

http://www.marketingdirecto.com

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Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum) / Article: Recommended Reading ;0)

by Braden Kelley

Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum)I had the opportunity to interview Seth Godin, author of “Linchpin”, “Purple Cow”, “Tribes” and nine other books, at the World Innovation Forum 2010 in New York, NY.

On stage, Seth Godin presented mostly a fusion of content from “Tribes” and “Linchpin”. He started by defining innovation as doing ’stuff’ that’s impossible, otherwise someone would already be doing it.

Seth spent a good deal of time talking about the importance of movements and the failings of traditional marketing and advertising. One of the examples he used was that of the Candy Shoppe, along a highway somewhere in America, right next to a store that offered gas, donuts, burgers, fries, etc. The Candy Shoppe was so successful that it built a second identical store directly across the street so that people going the other direction didn’t have to try and make a left turn or a u-turn to visit them. A very powerful example of the power of doing one thing really well. There were lots of great quotes including:


ARTICULO RECOMENDADO / Article Recommended Reading

by Braden Kelley

Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum)I had the opportunity to interview Seth Godin, author of “Linchpin”, “Purple Cow”, “Tribes” and nine other books, at the World Innovation Forum 2010 in New York, NY.

On stage, Seth Godin presented mostly a fusion of content from “Tribes” and “Linchpin”. He started by defining innovation as doing ’stuff’ that’s impossible, otherwise someone would already be doing it.

Seth spent a good deal of time talking about the importance of movements and the failings of traditional marketing and advertising. One of the examples he used was that of the Candy Shoppe, along a highway somewhere in America, right next to a store that offered gas, donuts, burgers, fries, etc. The Candy Shoppe was so successful that it built a second identical store directly across the street so that people going the other direction didn’t have to try and make a left turn or a u-turn to visit them. A very powerful example of the power of doing one thing really well. There were lots of great quotes including: Leer más “Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum) / Article: Recommended Reading ;0)”

Six things about deadlines


by Seth Godin

  1. People don’t like deadlines. They mean a decision, shipping and risk. They force us to decide.
  2. Deadlines work. Products that are about to disappear, auctions that are about to end, tickets that are about to sell out–they create forward motion. Leer más “Six things about deadlines”

16 questions for free agents


Seth Godin
Image via Wikipedia

By Seth Godin

If you’re starting out as an entrepreneur or a freelancer or a project manager, the most important choice you’ll make is: what to do? As in the answer to the question, “what do you do?”

Some questions to help you get started:

  1. Who are you trying to please?
  2. Are you trying to make a living, make a difference, or leave a legacy?
  3. How will the world be different when you’ve succeeded?
  4. Is it more important to add new customers or to increase your interactions with existing ones?
  5. Do you want a team? How big? (I know, that’s two questions) Leer más “16 questions for free agents”

Simple five step plan for just about everyone and everything


The number of people you need to ask for permission keeps going down:

1. Go, make something happen.
2. Do work you’re proud of.

3. Treat people with respect.

4. Make big promises and keep them.

5. Ship it out the door.

When in doubt, see #1.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2010/05/simple-five-step-plan-for-just-about-everyone-and-everything.html

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Pfffft, the danger of premature shipment

The old economy demanded a flurry of hard work, obsessive focus, and a charrette before launch. Launches were expensive and rare, and managers and co-workers would push to get everything just right before hitting the big red button to announce, ship and launch. The attention demanded by this scarcity raised the game, overcame fear and pushed things from one level to another.

A big reason for the push is to ameliorate risk. Launching is risky business, and one way to diminish that risk in a world of scarcity and market noise is to go big. And then big becomes a habit.


The old economy demanded a flurry of hard work, obsessive focus, and a charrette before launch. Launches were expensive and rare, and managers and co-workers would push to get everything just right before hitting the big red button to announce, ship and launch. The attention demanded by this scarcity raised the game, overcame fear and pushed things from one level to another.

A big reason for the push is to ameliorate risk. Launching is risky business, and one way to diminish that risk in a world of scarcity and market noise is to go big. And then big becomes a habit. Leer más “Pfffft, the danger of premature shipment”