Three questions to ask your marketing team – Vía @ThisIsSethsBlog CC/ @danidron @smilatam


by Seth Godin
(or your business development team, your fundraising team or your pr folks)…

  • Who are you trying to reach?
  • Why do they decide to support us?
  • What do you need in order to make this happen more often?

The answer? + http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2013/09/three-questions-to-ask-your-marketing-team.html

 

Seth Godin dejará de publicar libros tradicionales

Uno de los gurús más importantes del marketing y el panorama tecnológico a nivel mundial, Seth Godin, ha anunciado que dejará de publicar libros en papel. Después de haber escrito 12 libros, no cree que el esfuerzo que implica el proceso tradicional de publicación merezca la pena. Godin es autor de libros tan populares como “La vaca de color púrpura”.


Uno de los gurús más importantes del marketing y el panorama tecnológico a nivel mundial, Seth Godin, ha anunciado que dejará de publicar libros en papel. Después de haber escrito 12 libros, no cree que el esfuerzo que implica el proceso tradicional de publicación merezca la pena. Godin es autor de libros tan populares como “La vaca de color púrpura”.

Durante una entrevista con Mediabistro, Godin explicó que no le gusta “el largo periodo de espera, los filtros, el gran esfuerzo que se hace para el lanzamiento, obligar a la gente a que vaya a una tienda que generalmente no visita para comprar algo que habitualmente no compra, y hacerles pagar por una idea en un formato en el que es difícil de divulgarse”.

El experto asegura que todo ese esfuerzo no merece la pena, porque puede llegar a “10 o 50 veces más gente de manera electrónica”.

http://www.marketingdirecto.com

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Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum) / Article: Recommended Reading ;0)

by Braden Kelley

Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum)I had the opportunity to interview Seth Godin, author of “Linchpin”, “Purple Cow”, “Tribes” and nine other books, at the World Innovation Forum 2010 in New York, NY.

On stage, Seth Godin presented mostly a fusion of content from “Tribes” and “Linchpin”. He started by defining innovation as doing ’stuff’ that’s impossible, otherwise someone would already be doing it.

Seth spent a good deal of time talking about the importance of movements and the failings of traditional marketing and advertising. One of the examples he used was that of the Candy Shoppe, along a highway somewhere in America, right next to a store that offered gas, donuts, burgers, fries, etc. The Candy Shoppe was so successful that it built a second identical store directly across the street so that people going the other direction didn’t have to try and make a left turn or a u-turn to visit them. A very powerful example of the power of doing one thing really well. There were lots of great quotes including:


ARTICULO RECOMENDADO / Article Recommended Reading

by Braden Kelley

Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum)I had the opportunity to interview Seth Godin, author of “Linchpin”, “Purple Cow”, “Tribes” and nine other books, at the World Innovation Forum 2010 in New York, NY.

On stage, Seth Godin presented mostly a fusion of content from “Tribes” and “Linchpin”. He started by defining innovation as doing ’stuff’ that’s impossible, otherwise someone would already be doing it.

Seth spent a good deal of time talking about the importance of movements and the failings of traditional marketing and advertising. One of the examples he used was that of the Candy Shoppe, along a highway somewhere in America, right next to a store that offered gas, donuts, burgers, fries, etc. The Candy Shoppe was so successful that it built a second identical store directly across the street so that people going the other direction didn’t have to try and make a left turn or a u-turn to visit them. A very powerful example of the power of doing one thing really well. There were lots of great quotes including: Leer más “Seth Godin Interview (World Innovation Forum) / Article: Recommended Reading ;0)”

Six things about deadlines


by Seth Godin

  1. People don’t like deadlines. They mean a decision, shipping and risk. They force us to decide.
  2. Deadlines work. Products that are about to disappear, auctions that are about to end, tickets that are about to sell out–they create forward motion. Leer más “Six things about deadlines”

16 questions for free agents


Seth Godin
Image via Wikipedia

By Seth Godin

If you’re starting out as an entrepreneur or a freelancer or a project manager, the most important choice you’ll make is: what to do? As in the answer to the question, “what do you do?”

Some questions to help you get started:

  1. Who are you trying to please?
  2. Are you trying to make a living, make a difference, or leave a legacy?
  3. How will the world be different when you’ve succeeded?
  4. Is it more important to add new customers or to increase your interactions with existing ones?
  5. Do you want a team? How big? (I know, that’s two questions) Leer más “16 questions for free agents”

Simple five step plan for just about everyone and everything


The number of people you need to ask for permission keeps going down:

1. Go, make something happen.
2. Do work you’re proud of.

3. Treat people with respect.

4. Make big promises and keep them.

5. Ship it out the door.

When in doubt, see #1.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2010/05/simple-five-step-plan-for-just-about-everyone-and-everything.html

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Pfffft, the danger of premature shipment

The old economy demanded a flurry of hard work, obsessive focus, and a charrette before launch. Launches were expensive and rare, and managers and co-workers would push to get everything just right before hitting the big red button to announce, ship and launch. The attention demanded by this scarcity raised the game, overcame fear and pushed things from one level to another.

A big reason for the push is to ameliorate risk. Launching is risky business, and one way to diminish that risk in a world of scarcity and market noise is to go big. And then big becomes a habit.


The old economy demanded a flurry of hard work, obsessive focus, and a charrette before launch. Launches were expensive and rare, and managers and co-workers would push to get everything just right before hitting the big red button to announce, ship and launch. The attention demanded by this scarcity raised the game, overcame fear and pushed things from one level to another.

A big reason for the push is to ameliorate risk. Launching is risky business, and one way to diminish that risk in a world of scarcity and market noise is to go big. And then big becomes a habit. Leer más “Pfffft, the danger of premature shipment”

The modern business plan

It’s not clear to me why business plans are the way they are, but they’re often misused to obfuscate, bore and show an ability to comply with expectations. If I want the real truth about a business and where it’s going, I’d rather see something else. I’d divide the modern business plan into five sections:

* Truth
* Assertions
* Alternatives
* People
* Money

The truth section describes the world as it is. Footnote if you want to, but tell me about the market you are entering, the needs that already exist, the competitors in your space, technology standards, the way others have succeeded and failed in the past. The more specific the better. The more ground knowledge the better. The more visceral the stories, the better. The point of this section is to be sure that you’re clear about the way you see the world, and that you and I agree on your assumptions. This section isn’t partisan, it takes no positions, it just states how things are.


It’s not clear to me why business plans are the way they are, but they’re often misused to obfuscate, bore and show an ability to comply with expectations. If I want the real truth about a business and where it’s going, I’d rather see something else. I’d divide the modern business plan into five sections:

  • Truth
  • Assertions
  • Alternatives
  • People
  • Money

The truth section describes the world as it is. Footnote if you want to, but tell me about the market you are entering, the needs that already exist, the competitors in your space, technology standards, the way others have succeeded and failed in the past. The more specific the better. The more ground knowledge the better. The more visceral the stories, the better. The point of this section is to be sure that you’re clear about the way you see the world, and that you and I agree on your assumptions. This section isn’t partisan, it takes no positions, it just states how things are. Leer más “The modern business plan”

Who is easily manipulated?

Sometimes (and too often) marketers work to manipulate people. I define manipulation as working to spread an idea or generate an action that is not in a person’s long-term best interest.

The easiest people to manipulate are those that don’t demand a lot of information, are open to messages from authority figures and are willing to make decisions on a hunch, particularly if there’s a promise of short-term gains.

If you want to focus on the short run and sell something, get a vote or gather a mob, the easiest place to start is with populations that leave themselves open to manipulation.


Sometimes (and too often) marketers work to manipulate people. I define manipulation as working to spread an idea or generate an action that is not in a person’s long-term best interest.

The easiest people to manipulate are those that don’t demand a lot of information, are open to messages from authority figures and are willing to make decisions on a hunch, particularly if there’s a promise of short-term gains.

If you want to focus on the short run and sell something, get a vote or gather a mob, the easiest place to start is with populations that leave themselves open to manipulation. Leer más “Who is easily manipulated?”

Good at talking vs. good at doing

This is the chasm of the new marketing.

The marketing department used to be in charge of talking. Ads are talking. Flyers are talking. Billboards are talking. Trade shows are talking.

Now, of course, marketing can’t talk so much, because people can’t be easily forced to listen.


This is the chasm of the new marketing.

The marketing department used to be in charge of talking. Ads are talking. Flyers are talking. Billboards are talking. Trade shows are talking.

Now, of course, marketing can’t talk so much, because people can’t be easily forced to listen.

So the only option is to be in charge of doing. Which means the product, the service, the interaction, the effluent and other detritus left behind when you’re done.

If you’re in marketing and you’re not in charge of the doing, you’re not going to be able to do your job.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2010/05/good-at-talking-vs-good-at-doing.html
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The circles (no more strangers)

It’s so tempting to seek out more strangers.

More strangers to pitch your business, your candidate, your non-profit, your blog… More strangers means more upside and not so much downside. It means growth.

The problem is that strangers are difficult to convert. And the other problem is that they’re expensive to reach. And the hardest problem is that we’re running out of strangers.


Circlesofcustomers It’s so tempting to seek out more strangers.

More strangers to pitch your business, your candidate, your non-profit, your blog… More strangers means more upside and not so much downside. It means growth.

The problem is that strangers are difficult to convert. And the other problem is that they’re expensive to reach. And the hardest problem is that we’re running out of strangers. Leer más “The circles (no more strangers)”

Are you an elite?

In the developing world, there’s often a sharp dividing line between the elites and everyone else. The elites have money and/or an advanced education. It’s not unusual to go to the poorest places on earth and find a small cadre of people who aren’t poor at all. Sometimes, this is an unearned position, one that’s inherited or acquired in ways that take advantage of others. Regardless, you can’t just announce you’re an elite and become one.

In more and more societies, though (including my country and probably yours), I’d argue that there’s a different dividing line. This is the line between people who are actively engaged in new ideas, actively seeking out change, actively engaging–and people who accept what’s given and slog along. It starts in school, of course, and then the difference accelerates as we get older. Some people make the effort to encounter new challenges or to grapple with things they disagree with. They seek out new people and new opportunities and relish the discomfort that comes from being challenged to grow (and challenging others to do the same).


In the developing world, there’s often a sharp dividing line between the elites and everyone else. The elites have money and/or an advanced education. It’s not unusual to go to the poorest places on earth and find a small cadre of people who aren’t poor at all. Sometimes, this is an unearned position, one that’s inherited or acquired in ways that take advantage of others. Regardless, you can’t just announce you’re an elite and become one. Leer más “Are you an elite?”

Surfing is the new career

by Seth Godin

Three months ago I wrote about farming and hunting. It seems, though, that the growth industry of our generation is surfing.

Talk to surfers and they’ll explain that the entire sport comes down to the hunt for that blissful moment that combines three unstable elements in combination: the wave is just a little too big to handle, the board is going just a little too fast, and the ride could end at any moment.


by Seth Godin

Three months ago I wrote about farming and hunting. It seems, though, that the growth industry of our generation is surfing.

This makes for a great sport (for some people, anyway) but until recently, it wasn’t much of a career path. (aside: Aimless web surfing is a waste of time, and that’s not the sort of surfing I’m referring to). That feeling of freedom and risk in equal measure was difficult to find at work, so we sought it out on the slopes or the ocean. Leer más “Surfing is the new career”

Where do you find good ideas?

by Seth Godin

Do you often find ideas that change everything in a windowless conference room, with bottled water on the side table and a circle of critics and skeptics wearing suits looking at you as the clock ticks down to the 60 minutes allocated for this meeting?

If not, then why do you keep looking for them there?

The best ideas come out of the corner of our eye, the edge of our consciousness, in a flash. They are the result of misdirection and random collisions, not a grinding corporate onslaught. And yet we waste billions of dollars in time looking for them where they’re not.


Seth Godin
Image via Wikipedia

by Seth Godin

Do you often find ideas that change everything in a windowless conference room, with bottled water on the side table and a circle of critics and skeptics wearing suits looking at you as the clock ticks down to the 60 minutes allocated for this meeting?

If not, then why do you keep looking for them there?

The best ideas come out of the corner of our eye, the edge of our consciousness, in a flash. They are the result of misdirection and random collisions, not a grinding corporate onslaught. And yet we waste billions of dollars in time looking for them where they’re not.

A practical tip: buy a big box of real wooden blocks. Write a key factor/asset/strategy on each block in big letters. Play with the blocks. Build concrete things out of non-concrete concepts. Uninvite the devil’s advocate, since the devil doesn’t need one, he’s doing fine.

Have fun. Why not? It works.

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Consumer debt is not your friend

Here’s a simple MBA lesson: borrow money to buy things that go up in value. Borrow money if it improves your productivity and makes you more money. Leverage multiplies the power of your business because with leverage, every dollar you make in profit is multiplied.

That’s very different from the consumer version of this lesson: borrow money to buy things that go down in value. This is wrongheaded, short-term and irrational.


by Seth Godin
Here’s a simple MBA lesson: borrow money to buy things that go up in value. Borrow money if it improves your productivity and makes you more money. Leverage multiplies the power of your business because with leverage, every dollar you make in profit is multiplied.

That’s very different from the consumer version of this lesson: borrow money to buy things that go down in value. This is wrongheaded, short-term and irrational. Leer más “Consumer debt is not your friend”