What is a Mission Statement? | businessnewsdaily.com


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A mission statement is a statement declaring the purpose of an organization or company — the reason for this company’s existence. A mission statement provides framework and context to help guide the company’s strategies and actions by spelling out the company’s overall goal. Ultimately, a mission statement helps guide decision-making internally while also articulating the company’s mission to customers, suppliers, and the community.

It’s important to note the distinction between a mission statement and a slogan. A mission statement is not a marketing tool designed to grab attention quickly. While it should be catchy and memorable, a mission statement is a thoughtful declaration designed to articulate the goals and philosophies of a company. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement differs from a vision statement. A mission statement says what the company currently is; a vision statement states what the company hopes to become. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement is not an evergreen statement. As a company evolves over time, the company’s mission and intent may also change. A good rule of thumb is to revisit the mission statement every five years to see if it needs to be fine-tuned or rewritten. A mission statement will keep your company on track, but it shouldn’t become stale or irrelevant.

What does a mission statement include?

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Happy Hunting: How a Smile Can Help You Get a Job


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Though it’s natural to feel down while searching for a job after a layoff, a new study shows just how critical it is to keep your spirits up.

The research reveals that maintaining a more positive and motivational outlook can have a positive effect on the job pursuit.

That’s especially true at the outset of the search, but the ability to stay energized and keep negative emotions in check is even more critical as the hunt drags on, the research shows.

The study, involving 177 unemployed people looking for work, conducted weekly assessments of self-management, job search status and mental health. At the beginning of the study, the participants spent an average of 17 hours per week looking for a job and reported a gradual improvement in their mental health. By the fourth month, however, time spent on the search had declined to 14 hours per week, and mental health began to decline.

“These findings show that the self-management strategies that people actually use make the key difference,” said study co-author Ruth Kanfer, a psychology professor at Georgia Tech.

[10 Personality Types Likely to Get Hired] Leer más “Happy Hunting: How a Smile Can Help You Get a Job”

Employees’ Most Outrageous ‘Late’ Excuses


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When it comes to excuses for being late for work, a new study shows American employees are very creative.

While traffic and lack of sleep top the CareerBuilder survey of employees’ tardiness explanations, a wide range of more unusual excuses — from a cat having the hiccups to thinking they might have won the lottery — also cropped up among the nation’s workers when they failed to show up on time.

The creativity may be necessary given the number of times such excuses are needed: Overall, 16 percent of employees arrive late to work once a week or more, the study revealed. Nearly 30 percent come in late at least once a month.

Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder, cautions against such behavior.

“Punctuality — or lack thereof — can impact how your commitment, reliability and performance are perceived by your employer,” she said.

And regularly showing up late can come with serious consequences. More than one-third of the employers surveyed have fired a staff member for not being at work on time.

The most common excuses for being late for work incorporated traffic issues, lack of sleep, bad weather, problems getting kids to school, transportation delays, spouses, pets and watching television. Leer más “Employees’ Most Outrageous ‘Late’ Excuses”

5 Signs It’s Time to Fire an Employee


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You’ve had that lingering feeling for too long, yet you just can’t bring yourself to do it. Maybe you’re worried you can’t do without them or maybe you just despise having to have “the talk.” Either way, putting off firing a poor performing employee is just putting off the inevitable. BusinessNewsDaily asked five experts to tell us the five telltale signs that it’s time to say: You’re fired.

The sign: General carefree attitude. — Arlene S. Hirsch, career and psychological counselor

“Do they want to do the job? Do they come to work late or leave early? Spend more time socializing than working? Miss deadlines? Make unnecessary mistakes? An employer can read between those lines that the employee doesn’t really want to be there anymore,” Hirsch said.

The sign: You see their resume on the copy machine. — Brad Karsh, president of JB Training Solutions

“If the employee is using company time and resources to find their next job, it is time for them to go,” Karsh said.

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The sign: When other employees are forced to pick up their slack. — Tmima Grinvald, certified professional business and life coach for The Round Well Coaching and Business Development

“Questions the manager has to ask themselves are, ‘Do I really want to have on my team an employee who is not competent enough to do the required job, considering they had received proper training? ‘ and ‘Do I really want to have on my team an employee who is not engaged,'” Grinvald said.

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The sign: When goals don’t align. — Barry Moltz, author and small business consultant

“The employee-employer relationship only works when the company goals match the employee goals. When this equation comes unbalanced, it is time to let the employee go,” Moltz said.

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The sign:You continually complain about an employee to family and friends. — Gary Cohen, executive coach and founder of CO2 Partners

“When you find yourself telling friends, loved ones or anyone that will listen to you another example of why this person is not working out. I find that spouses have great insight after listening to when you come home often complaining about the same person,” Cohen said.

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Is Your Job Killing Your Creativity?


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New research shows that 80 percent of people in five of the world’s largest economies feel that unlocking creativity is critical to economic growth. And nearly two-thirds of people feel creativity is valuable to society. But only one in four of the survey’s respondents believe they are living up to their own creative potential. Are we facing a global creativity gap?

Judging by evidence from the workplace, the answer is yes. In a study of 5,000 adults across the U.S., U.K., Germany, France and Japan sponsored by Adobe, a software developer, three out of four respondents said they are under growing pressure to be productive rather than creative, despite the fact that they are increasingly expected to think creatively on the job.

Across all of the countries surveyed, people said they spend only 25 percent of their time at work creating. Lack of time is seen as the biggest barrier to creativity (47 percent globally, 52 percent in United States).

More than half of those surveyed said that creativity is being stifled by their education systems, and many believe creativity is taken for granted (52 percent globally, 70 percent in the United States). Leer más “Is Your Job Killing Your Creativity?”

You Need to Look at Your Business Through a Wide Lens

Vision has been a hot button in management theory for a number of years, with much lip service being given to the imperatives of managing for the long term. Is managing for the long haul enough to remain competitive in an increasingly interdependent marketplace?

Depth of vision is well and good, but breadth of vision is equally important, says Ron Adner, a professor of strategy at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and a long-time student of the root causes of innovation success and failure.

As our world becomes ever more interdependent, commercial success depends not only on a company’s own innovation, but also on the success of the partners within that innovation ecosystem— suppliers, complementors, distributors, retailers and others. For an innovation’s value proposition to succeed, he writes in his new book on ecosystem strategy, “The Wide Lens: A New Strategy for Innovation ” (Portfolio, 2012), everyone must win.


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CREDIT: Wide lens image via Shutterstock

By: Ned Smith, BusinessNewsDaily Senior Writer
businessnewsdaily.com

Vision has been a hot button in management theory for a number of years, with much lip service being given to the imperatives of managing for the long term. Is managing for the long haul enough to remain competitive in an increasingly interdependent marketplace?

Depth of vision is well and good, but breadth of vision is equally important, says Ron Adner, a professor of strategy at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and a long-time student of the root causes of innovation success and failure.

As our world becomes ever more interdependent, commercial success depends not only on a company’s own innovation, but also on the success of the partners within that innovation ecosystem— suppliers, complementors, distributors, retailers and others. For an innovation’s value proposition to succeed, he writes in his new book on ecosystem strategy, “The Wide Lens: A New Strategy for Innovation ” (Portfolio, 2012), everyone must win. Leer más “You Need to Look at Your Business Through a Wide Lens”

CEOs Who Use Social Media Boost Company Image

BRANDfog CEO Ann Charles said America is at a point where business leaders can’t afford to shirk social media.

“As consumers begin to seek out brands that serve a broader social purpose, the best way to articulate company values is through the voice of the executive leadership team,” Charles said. “This bolsters confidence in business leadership and provides a halo effect for the entire brand.”

Among those surveyed, more than 80 percent said they were more likely to trust a company whose CEO and leadership team engage in social media.


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Despite many business executives’ reluctance to use Facebook and Twitter to communicate with customers and clients,

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new research shows leaders who buck the trend and use social media help raise a brand’s profile, instill confidence in a company’s leadership team and build greater trust, brand loyalty and purchase intent among customers.

In a study by social media branding firmBRANDfog, more than 80 percent of those surveyed believed CEOs whoengage on social media are better equipped than their peers to lead companies in today’s technology-laden world. Additionally, 93 percent believe that executive engagement on social media helps communicate company values and grow and evolve corporate leadership in times of crisis. Leer más “CEOs Who Use Social Media Boost Company Image”