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10 Cool Google Tricks To Try When You’re Bored

Bored, eh? I’ve got the cure for what ails ya’.  Open a new tab and start a…

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Learn The Psychology Behind Creating Rabidly Loyal Customers

All marketers are concerned with “customer loyalty”, and it’s no surprise why. …

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3 Ways To Get More ROI Out Of Your Email Marketing

According to an email marketing case study released by Marketing Sherpa, there is some solid ROI in…

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5 Companies With Profitable Online Customer Communities

Thinking of building an online customer community? Not sure where to start? Check out these five…

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14 Examples of The Persuasive Power of Color in Web Design

To see the impact color has on the overall user experience of a website, one need only strip away a hue to see how the visual flow is affected.
While color creates the mood and feel of the site by directing user attention to certain elements, there are many ways to approach the use of color. Hue, value, and saturation are all three integrated dimensions of color that, when used properly, can enhance the site’s message just as well, if not better, than using flashy colors.

In this article we’ll delve deeper into color psychology as it relates to web design, and view examples of sites that used color persuasively in their branding efforts.
A quick intro to color

For a primer on color, one should refer to the color wheel, as it presents a logically arranged sequence of pure hues. I’m sure you’re familiar with the primaries – red, yellow, and blue; and secondaries: green, orange, and purple – which are formed by mixing the primaries.
Tertiary colors are comprised of the middle colors like yellow-green and blue-green. They are created by mixing a primary color and a secondary color. We often refer to the color wheel as it can be used to create harmonious color schemes, leading to an effective visual experience.
The Power of Color…


To see the impact color has on the overall user experience of a website, one need only strip away a hue to see how the visual flow is affected.

While color creates the mood and feel of the site by directing user attention to certain elements, there are many ways to approach the use of color. Hue, value, and saturation are all three integrated dimensions of color that, when used properly, can enhance the site’s message just as well, if not better, than using flashy colors.

Color As A Persuasion Tool


In this article we’ll delve deeper into color psychology as it relates to web design, and view examples of sites that used color persuasively in their branding efforts.

A quick intro to color

For a primer on color, one should refer to the color wheel, as it presents a logically arranged sequence of pure hues. I’m sure you’re familiar with the primaries – red, yellow, and blue; and secondaries: green, orange, and purple – which are formed by mixing the primaries.

Tertiary colors are comprised of the middle colors like yellow-green and blue-green. They are created by mixing a primary color and a secondary color. We often refer to the color wheel as it can be used to create harmonious color schemes, leading to an effective visual experience.

The Power of Color… Leer más “14 Examples of The Persuasive Power of Color in Web Design”

How To Design a 404 Page That Keeps Visitors On Your Site

User Experience
You shouldn’t understate its utility. The 404 page is perhaps the most neglected web design element.
When your website visitors land on your 404 Page Not Found page, it can be everything from a major inconvenience to a pleasant surprise.

While this page has the sole function of telling the user where to go next, the creation of your 404 page should be approached from both a creative and functional point of view.
In this article I’ll present a few techniques to keep in mind when designing 404 pages of your own.


User Experience
You shouldn’t understate its utility.  The 404 page is perhaps the most neglected web design element.

When your website visitors land on your 404 Page Not Found page, it can be everything from a major inconvenience to a pleasant surprise.

design-404-page

While this page has the sole function of telling the user where to go next, the creation of your 404 page should be approached from both a creative and functional point of view.

In this article I’ll present a few techniques to keep in mind when designing 404 pages of your own.

1. Explain the Issue

Ease the worry in the user’s mind by addressing the issue that landed them on this page. Simple errors may be a mistyped URL, slight variations in the URL, or even a recent site re-launch.

Gog’s 404 page alerts users the page doesn’t exist, and then encourages them to check their spelling and try again. If that fails, they also have the option of reporting an error. The simple design also stays true to the design of Gog.com and allows for easy navigation through the menu and search bar at the top.

This 404 page gives the user a few valid reasons why the page doesn’t exist. This actual 404 page is integrated into the design of the site, placing no doubt in the user’s mind where they are. Doing so also allows the user easy access to other content on site and encourages them to stick around. Leer más “How To Design a 404 Page That Keeps Visitors On Your Site”

Infographics: How to Strike the Elusive Balance between Data and Visualization

They started out as a social media experiment and then suddenly everyone wanted a piece.

A couple years back, if you dropped the word ‘Infographic’ or ‘Dataviz’ in a conversation, you would have been greeted by a good number of confused looks even if you were among other web designers.

Today, so many infographics have gone viral that it’s practically impossible to ignore them. You’ll find them tweeted by your friends who want to share an interesting new find, promoted by companies eager to display their growth trends and utilized by even the White House for its progress reports.

No matter what you are searching for online, whether employment statistics or endangered animals, you are sure to find an infographic for it. If you, miraculously, aren’t able to recall any that you have seen, take a look at this list of the 10 best infographics of 2011 via Nowsourcing to catch up.
Infographics spice up ‘boring’ data

Infographics are useful because they turn historically lengthy and tedious bulks of data in to something that’s much more interesting: a visual.

As a society heading into the new decade, we want to read less and see more. While this doesn’t bode too well for book publishers, it’s opened a whole new creative area for designers.

An increasing number of companies and clients are recognizing the benefits of infographics and want their data jazzed up and dressed for the prom. They know that their assiduously compiled information has a far better chance of being read, appreciated, shared and widely circulated if it looks less like an annual report and more like the next big meme. And if you aren’t convinced yet, here’s an infographic on why you should use infographics.
You will need your existing skills. And more.

While the graphics used in infographics have become more eye-catching and sophisticated, they are not too different in purpose from the charts and graphs we used to make in high school. After all, the objective is still to present data in a more visually engaging and accessible way.

However, print and web designers are having a hard time transferring their existing skills to infographics because, as the many aspiring infographics designers will tell you, designing good infographics isn’t as simple as it looks. Sure, you still need the same essential aesthetic and technical skills but you should also be able to effectively translate data into visuals. Most importantly, you need to ensure that the infographic acts as an informative tool and not as a visual distraction.
The 7 rules of great infographic design…


They started out as a social media experiment and then suddenly everyone wanted a piece.

A couple years back, if you dropped the word ‘Infographic’ or ‘Dataviz’ in a conversation, you would have been greeted by a good number of confused looks even if you were among other web designers.

Today, so many infographics have gone viral that it’s practically impossible to ignore them. You’ll find them tweeted by your friends who want to share an interesting new find, promoted by companies eager to display their growth trends and utilized by even the White House for its progress reports.

No matter what you are searching for online, whether employment statistics or endangered animals, you are sure to find an infographic for it. If you, miraculously, aren’t able to recall any that you have seen, take a look at this list of the 10 best infographics of 2011 via Nowsourcing to catch up.

Infographics spice up ‘boring’ data

Infographics are useful because they turn historically lengthy and tedious bulks of data in to something that’s much more interesting: a visual.

As a society heading into the new decade, we want to read less and see more. While this doesn’t bode too well for book publishers, it’s opened a whole new creative area for designers.

An increasing number of companies and clients are recognizing the benefits of infographics and want their data jazzed up and dressed for the prom. They know that their assiduously compiled information has a far better chance of being read, appreciated, shared and widely circulated if it looks less like an annual report and more like the next big meme. And if you aren’t convinced yet, here’s an infographic on why you should use infographics.

You will need your existing skills. And more.

While the graphics used in infographics have become more eye-catching and sophisticated, they are not too different in purpose from the charts and graphs we used to make in high school. After all, the objective is still to present data in a more visually engaging and accessible way.

However, print and web designers are having a hard time transferring their existing skills to infographics because, as the many aspiring infographics designers will tell you, designing good infographics isn’t as simple as it looks. Sure, you still need the same essential aesthetic and technical skills but you should also be able to effectively translate data into visuals. Most importantly, you need to ensure that the infographic acts as an informative tool and not as a visual distraction. Leer más “Infographics: How to Strike the Elusive Balance between Data and Visualization”