The Pitfalls Businesses Need To Avoid On Social Media – thnxz to @simplyzesty @qoreilly


 

Via simplyzesty.com

Digital marketing has come a long way in the last few years. From something that was a nice addition to your marketing strategy, we’ve reached the point where having a social media presence for your business is a necessity. However, while most small and medium businesses (thankfully) avoid creating a social media presence for the sake of it, there are other traps that they fall into instead. Here are a list of the most common problems.

Taking On Too Much

One of the biggest mistakes that SME’s make when they’re creating profiles is that they take on too much and try and cram it into what’s already a hectic schedule. The temptation to keep up with all the latest trends and any new sites that emerge is great and one that can’t be helped. After all, we don’t want to look like we’re behind or out of touch with what people are using.

It’s all well and good that you have a Facebook page and a Twitter profile, but do you also need a LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest and Instagram profile on top of that as well? This is the question most of us answer by creating new profiles in a bid to stay relevant and to show we’re on top of things.

However, that can mean we spread ourselves too thin and ultimately create profiles that are rarely updated. Sometimes this can either make you look uninterested or lazy, but even if this isn’t the case, you may end up getting stressed out as you try to update all your profiles regularly and keep them active.

Full article 😉

How Do You Solve This?
There are two ways to make this work to your advantage. The first is to cross-post content. Certain types of content work better on specific sites. For example, images are the most popular type of content posted on Facebook so if you’re updating regularly on Instagram, then post your images on Facebook. If you’re using Twitter regularly, why not post a link to content from your LinkedIn page and so on.

While there are tools which allow you to cross post automatically, it’s usually better to post them manually since followers are less likely to click on automated posts, as there’s no personality behind them.

If that’s too much, sometimes it’s better to cut your losses and get rid of the profiles that you’re no longer using. If you’re worried about losing your Twitter handle or unique URL, remember that a lot of accounts don’t necessarily use handles that have their official title.

Using The One Profile For Both Professional & Personal

Using Profile Personal ProfessionalWe should stress that there’s absolutely nothing wrong with doing this, and since this is becoming a more common occurrence on Twitter, it’s easy to see why it’s becoming popular. Managing one main account is certainly easier than updating two different accounts, combining them means you can give your brand personality, which will allow your followers to better relate to you, and a more casual approach will make your feed more enjoyable to follow.

Full article 😉

However, there are certain dangers to using this approach, mainly that if you say or post something that could be deemed as controversial, this will not only reflect badly on you, but your business will take a hit as well since they’re both one and the same.

How Do You Solve This?
As mentioned, common sense is paramount here. While you should definitely keep your personality apparent in your tweets, you should be wary of what you’re posting. Most of the time, this won’t apply as we post links to articles or converse with people, but if it’s something controversial or could be deemed as edgy, you’ll need to take into consideration how it will be received by followers.

In the case of Twitter, if you do post something that could get a negative response – if it’s something that could be misinterpreted – make sure you take a second or third tweet to explain the context behind that tweet. While it’s a great place for snappy messages, that very strength means that Twitter isn’t suited to opinions that are more complex than 140 characters.

And if you’re ever in doubt about how something will be received, don’t post it.

Focusing On The One Metric

Full article 😉

 

Anuncios

Why The Best Social Media Algorithm Is Yourself // thnxz @simplyzesty !


Simply Zesty

When it comes to the Web, information is infinite. Or at least that’s what it feels like when you’re dealing with numerous feeds on a daily basis. If you think about the sites we visit on a daily basis, you’ll realise that without even trying, there’s a lot competing for our attention. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, RSS readers. Already, that’s a lot of feeds fighting for your attention without factoring in mobile apps or the numerous aggregation sites out there.

With more information, we need more help to make sense of it all since realistically, we’re probably only interested in half of what’s posted at any time. But are we placing too much trust in these algorithms?

Linear Progression

Our social media feeds have evolved to the point that we’re not just seeing what our friends are posting, but what the world is doing. Even just looking at how Facebook evolved in recent times, its focus has shifted from the personal to the global with articles, brands, links, news, games all fighting for your attention. What you’re left with is an overload of information that is almost impossible to take in.

Of course, Facebook and Google+ preempted this by introducing its own algorithms to help filter your newsfeed. Edgerank is the most prolific example out there, prioritising certain stories based on your interaction and preferences. For the most part, you don’t even have to interact with these posts for Facebook to figure out which posts you prioritise. Google+, on the other hand, focuses more on your circles. For each new circle you create, you can adjust how frequently its posts appear in your news feed. If you’re smart with how you use your circles, you can have a great deal of control over what appears and what doesn’t.

However, there are always flaws to such an algorithm. For one, people and pages won’t always be consistent with the type of content they post. Since taste is so subjective, there will always be a case where certain posts will resonate better with you than others. However, sometimes this can be a problem as an ignored post could mean it won’t appear the second time round, especially if it’s a business page, which is given less priority than personal profiles.

On the flip side, you only have to look at the likes of Twitter to see the argument against having an unfiltered newsfeed. The social equivalent to an RSS reader (but without the nagging unread section that guilts you into reading everything), you know that if something was posted 30 minutes before you logged in, the chances of you actually reading it is pretty slim.

This presents a dilemma of sorts. As our thirst for more information grows and the amounts available to us increases, our ability to consume large amounts of information and retain it remains the same.

Taking Back Control  [+full article]