Tips for Building Your First Web App – Thnxz @sixrevisions


These tips are from a person who started out as someone who wasn’t familiar with Web programming. When I first started developing my first web app, I wasn’t a web developer. I was a business guy.

(If you want to read my story on how I built my first web app in only a few months using Ruby on Rails, check out my article: Why Making Web Apps with Rails Is Awesome.)

An assumption I’m going to make about you, the person reading this article, is that you’re already a web developer, or that you’ll be hiring one for your first web app. I’ll be discussing practical, general tips that are applicable to all web apps regardless of what Web technologies you’re using. So please don’t expect some deep-level web programming techniques in this article, because you’ll find none.

Another assumption I’m making is that you’re going to build your first web app without investing hundreds of thousands of dollars into version 1.0. I’ll assume that your budget is in the $5,000 range largely because that’s where my experience lies.

With my preface all said and done, let me share my seven tips based off my own web app development experience.

1. Think in Terms of Data Relationships

Regardless of complexity, size or feature set, you can break down any web application into this simple operational mechanics:

  1. The web app takes in data from users
  2. The web app processes and decides what to do with that data
  3. The web app produces some output for the users

All web apps work like that, so at the start, it’s best to break down your web app’s core features into data relationships to see:

  • How your web app should be built
  • How your web app might deal with user data and presentation
  • What features you need to prioritize
  • What web services and web technologies you’ll need to enlist and get familiar with

And so on. | Full article +INFO 🙂

For example, let’s take the primary feature of Instagram — posting a photo up on the photo-sharing service — and break it down into the fundamental operational mechanics above:

  1. The web app takes in a photo from users
  2. The web app processes the photo to scale it up or down to the layout of Instagram and also what photo effect the user wants to apply to the photo
  3. The web app produces a modified image and displays it for the usersI know you may not be able to think naturally like that at first whenever you look at web apps, but the more you use other web apps, and the more you think about them in all of these little pieces of data relationships, the easier it is for you to conceptualize and build your web app.

2. Keep Track of UIs and Websites That Inspire You

Do you have examples of web applications and websites that you like?
Full article +INFO 🙂

 

3. Keep the First Version as Simple as Possible

Building a minimum viable product (MVP) is a popular concept for online startups.
Full article +INFO 🙂

 

4. Focus on Behavior and Less on Look-and-Feel

Quite often, frustrations that people have with a web app come from the way it behaves, not the way it looks.
Full article +INFO 🙂

 

5. Use Free or Affordable Web Services as Much as Possible

Even if you just won the lottery and have money to burn, don’t be frivolous with your funds.
Full article +INFO 🙂

 

6. Use Third-Party APIs with Caution

An API is a way for a developer to get access to the data of an external web service. For example, Twitter’s API allows any developer to build an app that accesses public tweets and the account information of Twitter users.
Full article +INFO 🙂

 

7. Focus on the Excellent Execution of Your Idea

I can’t think of one web app that was successful based solely on being “the first.”
Full article +INFO 🙂

Anuncios

Luna Corona


On June 14 and 15, from 238,900 miles away, the crescent moon will participate in a giant Corona billboard in downtown Manhattan, by literally becoming the slice of lime in a bottle of Corona. For more information, please visit http://www.facebook.com/CoronaExtraUSA.

A User Experience Business of One – Thnxz to @uxbooth


The story behind what we today know as the Business Model Canvas is an interesting one. Originally created as a conceptual framework for Alexander Osterwalder’s PhD project, it later became the subject of an entire book calledBusiness Model Generation, co-authored with Yves Pigneur. Today, both the book and the canvas allow those of us without business training (including yours truly) to better understand sustainable business practices.

Vía uxbooth.com

My application of the Business Model Canvas is likely atypical, though. Instead of using the canvas to aid clients, I wondered: what if I looked at my role as a business itself? After all, I need resources to operate (a budget, my supervisors’ time, my colleagues’ expertise); I have customers (people to whom I provide value); I have costs (my time, materials, stress). Could understanding all these things help me design more efficiently?

Full article HERE 🙂 !

Introspection

To follow my logic, it’s useful to first understand how the business model canvas is laid out.

Personal Business Model Canvas Worksheet. Source: http://www.businessmodelyou.com

Divided into nine parts, it includes:

  • Key partners – Who supports you?
  • Key activities – What do you do to create value?
  • Key resources – What do you require?
  • Customers – For whom do you create value?
  • Value – What problems do you solve? What needs do you address?
  • Channels – How do you communicate your value?
  • Customer relationships – How you interact with customers?
  • Revenue – What do you get?
  • Costs – What do you give?Full article HERE 🙂 !

Using the original book’s sequel (Business Model You) as a guide, I thought critically about my role within my organization. Rather than rigorously weigh all nine considerations here, though – something for which the book is much better suited – let’s look at three in particular: customers, value provided, and key channels.

Customers: not just the end-user

While it’s relatively easy to assume that our customers are the same as the customers of the company for which we work, this isn’t strictly the case. As the book defines them, customers are anyone for whom we’re creating value, including:

  • Clients and stakeholders, who rely on us for our expertise;
  • End-users, who rely on us to represent their needs;
  • Software developers, who rely on us to clarify interactions and interfaces;
  • Other members of the design team, who rely on us for user research; and, finally,
  • Colleagues in quality assurance, who rely on us for specifications and clarifications.

Notice that end-users are only one item on the list. Notice, also, thatcolleagues are customers too. Couple this with the fact that we practice user-centered design and it becomes increasingly obvious why it’s part of our job to consider our team and their benefit.

User experience design isn’t limited to human-computer interaction; it includes human-human interaction as well. Before filling out the canvas, I instinctively knew this – that my responsibility did not end with “end users” – however, I didn’t know what I could do to serve them more effectively. That’s when I considered value propositions.

Full article HERE 🙂 !

About the Author

Evgenia (Jenny) Grinblo

Evgenia (Jenny) Grinblo is a user experience practitioner at London-based mobile agency, Future Workshops. A native Russian-Israeli, she approaches her practice with a sociological mind and a passion for facilitating team work. When away from her iMac, she is a foosball apprentice and an occasional speaker on empathy in design.

Google is working on new tech to eliminate all child porn on the web


Google hopes the new database is operational in less than a year, according to The Telegraph.
“This announcement is inspiring for those who are at the forefront of tackling child sexual abuse content,” Susie Hargreaves, chief executive officer of the Internet Watch Foundation, told The Telegraph. “We know that the best way to tackle what is some of the most horrific content online is by working with others from all over the world to combat this on a global platform.”

MIT’s new automated ‘life coach’ can help you ace job interviews (video)


The point of MACH is to help people realize when they do things like not make eye contact with someone their talking to as well as other things that might come off as overly nervous or just plan strange. MIT notes that social phobias plague over 15 million adults in the U.S. alone, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Software like this could really come in handy for those that just aren’t good with social interaction — especially if you’re trying to get a new job.