Gramática de Twitter: 10 claves para leer mejor | por ARIEL TORRES


por ARIEL TORRES | manualdeestilo.com

Una de las primeras cosas que sacrificamos cuando tenemos mucho para decir y poco espacio en blanco es la claridad. Los avisos clasificados son un ejemplo clásico. Pero la civilización viene lidiando con el asunto desde mucho antes.

Los griegos de la época de Sócrates, por ejemplo, escribían todo en mayúsculas y sin espacio entre palabras. Su idioma estaba preparado para aprovechar al máximo el escaso espacio disponible. Con un poco de entrenamiento era posible leer de corrido un texto que parecía extraído de la fantasía más delirante del más osado diseñador gráfico. Puede verse una muestra de esto en la piedra de Rosetta (el fragmento en griego es el que está en la base de la piedra). Leer más “Gramática de Twitter: 10 claves para leer mejor | por ARIEL TORRES”

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What Your Brain Has to Do With Your Brand


 |  | inc.com

Tell your employees and customers about how you think and behave, your innate genetic strengths and preferences, and you'll see your brand loyalty grow.

 

On a whim, I just Googled “personal branding” and got 7,300,000 results. On Amazon, I found 18,915 books listed under “Brand You.” That’s a lot of chatter. But I believe I have something new to add to the conversation.Business guru Tom Peters is credited with popularizing the idea of being your own brand 15 years ago. “We are CEOs of our own companies: Me Inc.,” he wrote.  “To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called you…. You’re not defined by your job title and you’re not confined by your job description. Starting today, you are a brand.”

Your brand is not your current job or title. It is not your skills and experiences, although of course these things matter. It is not, as many people suggest, one particular attribute with which you “differentiate yourself.” It is not your reputation, which is fragile and depends on what others say about you.

“Brand you” is the sum of your innate strengths and preferences that are locked into your genes and etched into your brain. It is the way you think and the habits you have, the way your mind processes information and the manner in which you explain your ideas. In the language of my company, it is your “thinking and behavioral attributes,” how you see and interact with the world. These attributes generally do not change over time, and always can be depended upon, by you and others.

As author Maureen Johnson describes in her blog: “A personal brand is a little package you make of yourself so you can put yourself on the shelf in the marketplace and people will know what to expect or look for when they come to buy you. For example, Coke is a brand. When you see Coke, you expect a dark brown effervescent sweet drink that is always going to taste like . . . Coke.” Leer más “What Your Brain Has to Do With Your Brand”

3 Ways to Get More Time Out of Less


 |  | inc.com

You can achieve more in a constrained market without running your employees into the ground. These three steps will get your team focused on the work that really drives growth.

Across the country, businesses are being pushed to do more with less. Typically this has taken the shape of longer hours, later nights, and a big group of unhappy employees. Achieving in a constrained market should not mean spending more time at the office doing less exciting work; it means that you should stop wasting time.

There are three steps managers and staff can take toward a more efficient, more productive organization. By 1) identifying and focusing on your biggest priorities, 2) completing two objectives every week, and 3) outsourcing work, you will find a smoother running organization that employees are happy to contribute to every day.

1. Identify and focus on your biggest priorities. Leer más “3 Ways to Get More Time Out of Less”

Don’t Let Meetings Suck Your Time


 |  | inc.com

Six reasons why I hate meetings, and what you can do to make them more efficient

Employee sleeping during meeting, man in pink shirt and glasses

 

I was recently out to lunch with a few colleagues who work at a very cool company. The CEO of their company had left, and the second in command had taken over. They like her, but they said the number of meetings they’re required to go to now has doubled.

They were describing my hell.

Now, I don’t think that meetings are completely useless. But I do think that most companies have useless meetings, including my own. And the people at my company, VerticalResponse, will tell you that they know how I feel.

Why do I hate meetings? Let me count the ways. Leer más “Don’t Let Meetings Suck Your Time”

Just 15% Of Smartphone Users Trust All Mobile Apps With Personal Info


marketingcharts.com

truste-mobile-app-privacy-trust-july2012.pngOnly 15% of smartphone users trust all mobile applications with their personal information,according to [download page] a survey released in July 2012 by TRUSTe, conducted by Harris Interactive. Instead, mobile app consumers take a variety of steps to protect their personal information: 38% research the app online, and 34% check to see if an app has a privacy policy.30% will read that privacy policy (if it is provided), and 21% check for a third-party trustmark or seal. 19% will ask friends about trustworthiness.

Only 14% of smartphone users this year believe that their app stores only offer privacy-safe apps. That is down significantly from 25% in 2011, reveals the “2012 US Online and Mobile Privacy Perceptions Report.” Faced with a mobile app they distrust, 85% of smartphone users do not download it, while 8% limits the information they share with the app, 4% limit their usage of the app, and just 3% report they do not change their behavior.

Smartphone Users Uncomfortable Sharing Many Forms of Data

Smartphone users feel safest sharing their gender with mobile apps, with 49% saying they would consent to do so, with age (36%) and email (35%) following. On the other end of the spectrum, just 1% would consent to sharing their list of contacts, 3% their photos and videos, and 5% their home addresses. Only 6% of app users would consent to sharing web-surfing behavior, a key element of online behavioral advertising (OBA), and 58% expressly indicate they do not like OBA. Finally, 28% say they would not consent to sharing any personal data with mobile apps.

University of California-Berkeley researchers in July found a similar reticence about sharing personal contacts. While 82% of mobile owners store contact information on their devices, 81% of device owners would probably (30%) or definitely (51%) not allow social networking applications to mine those contacts for friend suggestions, and 93% would probably (18%) or definitely (75%) not allow a coupons app to mine the list in order to offer coupons to their contacts, per findings.

50% Would Opt Out Of OBA Leer más “Just 15% Of Smartphone Users Trust All Mobile Apps With Personal Info”