5 Types Of Facebook Updates To Avoid | Written by Jeff Bullas


jeffbullas.com

As you might have noticed I am a firm believer in the power of social media, maybe even verging on evangelical. It’s existence has been brief  in the universal timeframe, so there have been no instructions handed down from ‘on high’ on 5 Types Of Facebook Updates To Avoidhow to best interact and play with this shiny new toy.

Governments have banned Facebook and Twitter, and some sovereign powers and groups even want to censor the ‘Net”.

We certainly didn’t receive instruction from our parents on the ‘Do’s and Dont’s’ of Facebook and that we should not be Facebooking while driving or after a relationship breakup.. you might find that engaging the brain before opening that status update box and emotionally typing could be the worst thing you have done in a long time.

We are still just working out that texting while drunk is not a healthy activity and sending  messages of ‘heartfelt honesty’ to your boss while inebriated during moments of  ‘Beer Goggle’ clarity at 2am on a Saturday night  is very likely to find you with a very clean desk on Monday morning.

There is no formal curriculum in high school on the moral issues of Facebook updates or what you should post on Twitter.

I have heard that the commandments on how often you should tweet are hidden in some secret vault in Siberia that only will be revealed when the time is right. In fact I and many others, I am sure, have been told  that we tweet to much. By the way, I have not yet told anyone that they don’t tweet enough.

So what are some of the types of updates and situations where we should be refraining rather than participating.

1. Incidental Happenings

This has to be one of the 7 wonders of  world that we as a species are prone to shout out and pronounce on Twitter or Facebook …  ‘just clipped my nails’ or ‘found a grey hair where it shouldn’t be’.

We don’t walk into the office and shout  out ‘I can’t believe it… I left a tissue in the washing last night’ unless you are looking for a demotion or some extended unexpected leave, maybe evolution is reversing and we are about to become extinct if we keep up this random behaviour. Charles Darwin would most probably roll over in his grave at Westminster Abbey if he heard about this latest update to the ‘Origin of the Species

2. Inspirational Wisdom… Leer más “5 Types Of Facebook Updates To Avoid | Written by Jeff Bullas”

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Changing the Conversation in Your Company


Boris Groysberg and Michael Slind

BORIS GROYSBERG AND MICHAEL SLIND
http://blogs.hbr.org

 

Boris Groysberg (bgroysberg@hbs.edu) is a professor of business administration at Harvard Business School. Michael Slind (mike@talkincbook.com) is a writer, editor, and communication consultant. They are co-authors of the book Talk, Inc.: How Trusted Leaders Use Conversation to Power Their Organizations (HBR Press, 2012).

In our experience, it’s rare for a diverse group of headstrong Executive Education participants from around the globe to agree on anything. Yet earlier this month, when we surveyed a group of leaders who attended the Driving Performance Through Talent Management program at Harvard Business School, 92% agreed that the practice of internal communication “has undergone a lot of change” at their companies “in recent years.”

While the sample size in this case isn’t large — about three-dozen leaders took part in the survey — these participants make up a highly representative group. They hail from every part of the globe, and from organizations small and large (with head counts that range from about 200 to more than 100,000). They occupy senior positions in fields that include sales and talent management, and they work in industries that range from manufacturing to health care to financial services.

That survey result reinforces a finding that we’ve observed elsewhere in our research: in company after company, the patterns and processes by which people communicate with each other are unmistakably in flux. The old “corporate communication” is giving way to a model that we call “organizational conversation.” That shift is, for many people, a disorienting process. But it also offers a great leadership opportunity.

Our research has shown that more and more leaders — from organizations that range from computer-networking giant Cisco Systems to Hindustan Petroleum, a large India-based oil supplier — are using the power of organizational conversation to drive their company forward. For these leaders, internal communication isn’t just an HR function. It’s an engine of value that boosts employee engagement and improves strategic alignment.

Broadly speaking, there are four steps that you can take to make your approach to leadership more conversational. (In future posts, we will address each of these points at greater length.)

1. Close the gap between you and your employees. In our survey, we also asked respondents to name the biggest employee communication challenge at their company. In response, one participant cited the need to “move away from top-down communication.” Another highlighted a “disparity between the senior management team and middle management due to low transparency.” Trusted and effective leaders overcome such challenges by speaking with employees in ways that are direct, personal, open, and authentic.

2. Promote two-way dialogue within your company… Leer más “Changing the Conversation in Your Company”