The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Social Media Marketers

Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood – Listen and Know Your Audience

Oftentimes we jump in to social media and start by posting. Many of the companies that I work with don’t spend time up front getting to know their audience and understanding their interests.

As the saying goes, you have two ears and one mouth for a reason. Spend time understanding what your audience really wants and how you can add value before you start posting.

Habit 6: Synergize – Engage the Right Resources in Your Organization

OK, so synergy is an overused buzzword, but there is value to working together to achieve more. Communicating on social media sites often involves many different parts of an organization. Typically marketing, PR, customer service, legal, and even product development play a role in developing and executing a social media plan.

Build the right internal structure and synergies to get results. Organizations that are not internally connected aren’t poised to succeed.

Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw – Invest Time and Resources to Stay Current

Social media changes quickly, and the tools of the trade are always changing and evolving. It is important for social media marketers to continuously invest in their skills to stay relevant and effective.

Be sure that your work plan involves time and a budget to dedicate to training and education. A desire to learn new things and stay on top of trends is key to success as a social media marketer.


clickz.com

sevenMany of us have read the book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” but as I was recently re-reading this book it occurred to me that most of these habits also apply to successful social media marketing.

Below is how “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” can be translated into habits that lead to successful social media marketers.

Habit 1: Be Proactive – Take Initiative

As a social media marketer it is important to be proactive and take initiative. Take initiative to learn the latest social media tools. Take initiative to bring your organization forward. Take initiative to test and learn. Take initiative to educate your organization. Take initiative to respond to customers.

Initiative is key to success as a social media marketer. In a fast-changing world, those who embrace learning and can generate buy-in to their ideas are well-positioned to succeed.

Habit 2: Begin With the End in Mind – Have a Plan!

Always begin your social media marketing with a clear vision of what success looks like. This means having a clear social media plan. Don’t just start posting on social media. Start by understanding what you want to achieve and build a plan to achieve it. My book, “Social Media Field Guide,” uses an eight-step approach to building a social media plan (see the graphic below).

social-media-plan-bw

Habit 3: Put First Things First – Prioritize

As a social media marketer (or a social participant) it is easy to log on to Facebook, LinkedIn, or Pinterest and suddenly wonder where the last few hours went. Prioritize how you spend your time on social media. In our social media training programs one of the tools we have is a social media checklist that helps marketers prioritize their goals once they log in to a site. Know what is most important to achieving your objectives and invest your time wisely.

Habit 4: Think Win-Win – Balance Marketing Objectives With Value to Your Audience

Oftentimes we approach social media at one of the two extremes. We either focus on what we as a business want, or focus on what our users want. The key to success is balancing the business objectives with what is actually valuable to your audience. The more value you create for your audience, the more value they will create for you. Consider both as you build and implement your plan. Leer más “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Social Media Marketers”

It’s Time to Rethink Continuous Improvement

Six Sigma, Kaizen, Lean, and other variations on continuous improvement can be hazardous to your organization’s health. While it may be heresy to say this, recent evidence from Japan and elsewhere suggests that it’s time to question these methods.

Admittedly, continuous improvement once powered Japan’s economy. Japanese manufacturers in the 1950s had a reputation for poor quality, but through a culture of analytical and systematic change Japan was able to go from worst to first. Starting in the 1970s, the country’s ability to create low-cost, quality products helped them dominate key industries, such as automobiles, telecommunications, and consumer electronics. To compete with this miraculous turnaround, Western companies, starting with Motorola, began to adopt Japanese methods. Now, almost every large Western company, and many smaller ones, advocate for continuous improvement.

But what’s happened in Japan? In the past year Japan’s major electronics firms have lost an aggregated $21 billion and have been routinely displaced by competitors from China, South Korea, and elsewhere. As Fujio Ando, senior managing director at Chibagin Asset Management suggests, “Japan’s consumer electronics industry is facing defeat. “Similarly, Japan’s automobile industry has been plagued by a series of embarrassing quality problems and recalls, and has lost market share to companies from South Korea and even (gasp!) the United States.


Ron Ashkenas


Six Sigma
KaizenLean, and other variations on continuous improvement can be hazardous to your organization’s health. While it may be heresy to say this, recent evidence from Japan and elsewhere suggests that it’s time to question these methods.

Admittedly, continuous improvement once powered Japan’s economy. Japanese manufacturers in the 1950s had a reputation for poor quality, but through a culture of analytical and systematic change Japan was able to go from worst to first. Starting in the 1970s, the country’s ability to create low-cost, quality products helped them dominate key industries, such as automobiles, telecommunications, and consumer electronics. To compete with this miraculous turnaround, Western companies, starting with Motorola, began to adopt Japanese methods. Now, almost every large Western company, and many smaller ones, advocate for continuous improvement.

But what’s happened in Japan? In the past year Japan’s major electronics firms have lost an aggregated $21 billion and have been routinely displaced by competitors from China, South Korea, and elsewhere. As Fujio Ando, senior managing director at Chibagin Asset Management suggests, “Japan’s consumer electronics industry is facing defeat. “Similarly, Japan’s automobile industry has been plagued by a series of embarrassing quality problems and recalls, and has lost market share to companies from South Korea and even (gasp!) the United States. Leer más “It’s Time to Rethink Continuous Improvement”

Optimize Your Social Media Schedule: 4 Tips for Avoiding the Social Media Time Suck

Twitter

5pm – best time to Tweet for re-tweets
1-4 per hour – most effective frequency of Tweets
Midweek & Weekends – best days to Tweet
Noon & 6pm – best time to Tweet for increase Click Through Rates
Facebook

Saturday- best day to share on Facebook
Noon- most effective time to share on Facebook
.5 per day – best sharing frequency
Tips for an Optimized Focus

Now lets talk about some no brainer “don’ts” that the many of us “do”. Let me know if any of these sound familiar to you:

Your best friend is having problems with their significant other so you keep your phone close, just in case…
It’s baseball season and your team is playing but you don’t have the day off, thank goodness for internet radio right…
You have email anxiety which forces you to check email every couple minutes because you never know what you might miss…
One of your colleagues is obsessed with chatting online and pings you every couple minutes with a question or joke…
You’re scheduling Tweets, posting on your personal facebook page, and reading Psychology Today all at the same time, because after all you are a master multi-tasker…
I too have often thought that I could do everything at once. A balancing act acquired from years of having too much to do, and not enough time. I considered multi-tasking an art form and a higher form of organization than my counterparts who only focused on one thing at a time. I could not have been more wrong. In recent years I’ve had to buckle down and force myself to devote all of my attention to one task at a time. I’ve found that the quality of my work has improved and the level of my stress has decreased significantly. Some tactics that have worked for me include:

Closing my email when I’m working on social media tasks
Close all Internet windows and tabs except for the one I need to work on
Disabling chat or closing chat windows to avoid distraction
Pick 15 minutes a day to indulge in activities such as checking personal social media profiles, responding to texts, or chatting with friends.
Spend 30 minutes to an hour each morning reviewing emails and responding, do the same thing before leaving at the end of the day.
It is significantly easier to stick to your schedule if you are working ONLY on the tasks you have scheduled in the time allotted.


optimize social media time

toprankblog.com

Making the time to execute on a social media strategy can rattle even the most experienced marketers.  Unlike traditional marketing, social media marketing can present many different challenges and distractions.  According to a study by eMarketer 73% of marketers say finding the time to create content as their biggest marketing challenge.

I recently ran a poll of @TopRankTwitter followers to get a sense of how they spend their time online.  I asked “If you had only 20 minutes a day to spend on social media what would you focus on?”  Some of the answers we received were:

  • @henryroominates – “I would try to connect with powerful Twitter users and Tweet content from my blog.”
  • @SebastianX – “I’d read my Twitter Followanyday List.”
  • @Paco_Belle – “Look at 2-3 Twitter lists, couple circles on G+, scroll Facebook timeline & look through my RSS feeds for new things.”
  • @Paramountbuzz – “Engaging others…doing it now.”
  • @GreenDolphin_ – “My RSS feed, Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook.”

If you are involved with implementing social media marketing, you know that 20 minutes a day just won’t cut it.  On top of implementing social media tactics, there’s also the task fo staying current. Lee’s post “11 Ways to Get Smarter & Stay Current in a World of Social Information Overload“ outlined how much time can be involved using social tools to collect, filter and curate social media marketing knowledge.

Avoiding Shiny Object Pitfalls… Leer más “Optimize Your Social Media Schedule: 4 Tips for Avoiding the Social Media Time Suck”

Walt Disney, fabricante de sueños | Biografía


materiabiz.com
Walt aplicó su propia filosofía: “todos nuestros sueños pueden ser verdad si tenemos el coraje de perseguirlos”

Nacido en Chicago en 1901, Walter Elías Disney comenzó su carrera en 1920 como dibujante de caricaturas en una empresa que fundó con unos amigos. Sus productos eran buenos pero el pequeño mercado local de Kansas, donde se estableció la compañía, era insuficiente para absorberlos. Tras la quiebra de la empresa, Disney se mudó a Hollywood donde creó, con su hermano Roy, la Disney Brothers Studio en el garage de su tío.Tras una serie de caricaturas que pasaron sin pena ni gloria, llegó el sensacional éxito con el debut del ratón Mickey en el histórico cortometraje sonoro Steamboat Willie. La espectacular recepción del público impulsó el crecimiento de la empresa y abrió campo para nuevos experimentos: efectos tridimensionales, la incorporación de música y el lanzamiento deBlancanieves y los Siete Enanitos, el primer largometraje de dibujos animados. Walt insistió en producirlo a pesar de que sus asesores le decían que era una locura y que llevaría a la ruina al estudio. Leer más “Walt Disney, fabricante de sueños | Biografía”

Tablets Want To Kill Your Laptop


By Antone Gonsalves | readwriteweb.com

Laptops are doomed. In the next five years, tablets will displace notebook-style computers to become the dominant personal computing platform. And the transition from laptop to tablet has already begun.

That’s the key finding of a new Forrester Research report that predicts the end of the laptop’s 15-year reign. The trend is already well under way among people born between 1980 and 2000, known to demographers as the millennial generation. In the U.S., 30% of tablet owners in this age group have purchased a tablet in place of a PC, compared to 20% of baby boomers.

“For this growing body of [millennial] users, PCs will seem like clunky trucks rather than sleek cars, dampening their long-term propensity to buy conventional PCs,” says the 19-page report authored by Forrester analyst Frank Gillett.

But the tablet won’t replace the laptop all by itself, Forrester says. File-sharing services such as Box,DropBoxSugarSync and Apple’s iCloud will be critical enabling technologies, as well as a new type of stationary display the analyst calls a frame, due to become commonplace by 2015.

Sales projections back up Forrester’s forecast. Tablets are expected to outsell laptops in 2016 as tablet shipments quintuple from 81.6 million in 2011 to 424.9 million by 2017, according to research firm DisplaySearch. Leer más “Tablets Want To Kill Your Laptop”

The Power of Beliefs to Move Markets and Mindsets


See on Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Mindsets matter. For more than two years, we and others have been talking about the need to shift the prevailing view among managers, boards of directors and investors from “quarterly capitalism” to what we call “capitalism for the long term”. Together with Harvard Business Review and the Management Innovation eXchange, we have issued a challenge calling for the most instructive case studies and provocative ideas that will help us re-imagine capitalism for the long term.

 

Despite promising signs of change, such as a growing turn away from the standard practice of issuing quarterly earnings guidance, old attitudes die hard. More and more, we realize, the crucial first step is to tackle our deeply embedded intellectual frameworks. Beliefs drive actions and altering our belief systems will ultimately do more than anything else to amplify and reinforce the kinds of behavioral changes that, in the end, are the only measure that counts. In this blog post we’d like to focus on two belief shifts that are critical.

 

1) Believe in your power to make markets efficient — but abandon the efficient market dogma

The global financial markets are an extraordinary information processing engine. Nothing beats the tracking mechanism of stock prices when it comes to quantifying the constant push-and-pull of thousands and thousands of investors and managers, pursuing and acting upon different strategies. And yet . . . it’s an extraordinary leap of faith to go from acknowledging this fact to believing, as orthodox efficient market theory holds, that markets are so efficient that all relevant information is always and immediately embedded in prices. Such a belief implies that any and all decisions that improve a company’s short term share price must logically also be improving its long term health and vice versa. There can be no contradiction, or so the theory goes.

In fact, much evidence suggests that the market often gets it very wrong in the short term — with the most telling example being the 2008 financial crash itself. Beyond such large and violent macro-swings, our own research at McKinsey suggests businesses that reallocate their capital more aggressively can generate higher long term returns than their more passive peers – even if, in the first few years, such actions initially reduce previously expected earnings (and thus may prompt a set of investors to sell down the stock, regardless of the long term value creation). Assuming the market is perfectly efficient, it appears, merely damns it to inefficiency.

Our suggestion: instead of passively accepting that the market is always right, investors, managers and boards of directors need to think in terms of how they can actively make it more efficient. In short, they need to develop and contribute viewpoints to the market – not assume the market already contains them – and then be ready to stick to their guns. This is the way both to achieve higher returns and make the market more efficient.

 

2) Believe in the real game — long-term value creation — and stop acting as if you are meeting your highest calling if you simply play by the rules

We direct this urgent call less at operating managers, who are out there getting muddy and trying to score goals every day, than at other critical corporate players, such as the trustees of pension funds and sovereign wealth funds or a company’s independent directors. Does anyone honestly think this crowd today are doing all they could to provide good governance and proper stewardship? Sadly no. Too often they focus more on checking the boxes and ensuring that they have met their (not inconsiderable) compliance obligations. But with a crucial mental reset, they could and should play a much more vital role in pursuing the real prize, which is long-term value creation.

For big pension fund and SWF managers, that role change starts with spending the real time required to understand and have a forward-looking viewpoint on their investments. There are many ways to achieve this end, once belief systems shift. One path could be to concentrate one’s portfolio. For example, Dutch pension fund PGGM, with over 100 billion euros under management, decided a few years ago to focus one of its 3 billion euros of its equity portfolio on 15-20 stocks, engage with those investments as an active long-term owner — and stop tracking the indexes. Another course might be to take more activity ‘in house’, especially if contracting investment management out makes it difficult to achieve alignment with one’s chosen asset managers. Or it may involve keeping a wide portfolio but concentrating governance efforts on shaping management and strategy at a few stocks at a time – and doing so either alone or in collaboration with others.

Independent directors confront the same challenge: currently they too often serve as the box-checking last step in signing-off on a CEO-run strategic process. If they want to move beyond obeying the letter of the laws governing their fiduciary duties and delve deeply into the content of strategy, then they need to increase one critical investment: their time. This won’t be easy, but there are signs the core belief system may be changing. In a recent survey of some 1600 members of boards of directors, we found that their number one goal is to spend more time on strategy and the best way to achieve this, they believe, is to carve out 10 more days a year for their board duties (a third more time than they are currently spending).

The key step is to foster deeper board engagement. Beyond that, we have learned, it also helps if an active independent director’s relevant skills match up with the strategy of the company he aims to steward. Our recent research on 110 large European companies managed by private equity firms found a strong correlation between successful value creation and the skill set of the partner serving as lead director. PE partners with extensive M&A experience delivered better results when the companies they were overseeing were also embarked on an aggressive M&A strategy. Similarly companies pursuing organic growth created more value when the lead directors from their PE owners had backgrounds with deep management expertise.

 

Obviously much more needs to be done to foster a capitalism that is truly patient, principled and socially accountable. The list stretches from adopting an investor relations policy that concentrates on fostering a long term investor base and developing better metrics to tackling, with guidance from active owners, some of the flaws and inequities in executive compensation. We intend to continue exploring those issues–and the solutions required to better address them–in our ongoing research. But the critical first step, we’re convinced, is for more and more institutional investors and independent board members to abandon old orthodoxies and embrace a new belief: the belief that through greater engagement and more active ownership/stewardship they can enhance the market’s efficiency while delivering greater value creation for stakeholders and shareholder alike.

See on blogs.hbr.org

¿Cómo funciona la mente de los profesionales de marketing? : Marketing Directo


See on Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Para llegar a las mejores ideas primero hay que entender qué es lo que está pasando en el mundo, o al menos intentarlo… Así es como comienza diciendo un nuevo estudio realizado por gyro, en el que se nos plantea que el trabajo ya no es un lugar, sino un estado mental y que ya no hay una línea divisoria entre el trabajo y el ocio, sino que ahora es simplemente la realidad del día a día.

Con el estudio se pretende demostrar que, sobre todo en las agencias, el planteamiento de 09.00 a 19.00 es algo del pasado y esto se tiene que reflejar en cómo las marcas se comunican con sus consumidores y clientes. En este sentido, desde gyro han colaborado con Forbes Insights para obtener una visión clara de cómo los ejecutivos consumen información y de qué forma influye esto en sus decisiones de negocio.

Para ello, se ha encuestado a más de 500 profesionales de marketing de P&G, HP y muchas otras de las principales compañías a nivel mundial. Entre los resultados cabe destacar que un 98% de los ejecutivos envía correos electrónicos fuera de la semana laboral de 9 a 5 tradicional. Contrariamente a lo que se cree sobre estar “siempre conectado”, esta nueva realidad está teniendo un efecto positivo en la vida profesional y personal de las personas.

Otros datos relevantes:
– Un 98% envía correos electrónicos relativos al trabajo por las noches y los fines de semana
– Un 63% revisa sus correos electrónicos profesionales cada 1 ó 2 horas
– Un 53% abandona la cena para ocuparse de temas profesionales
– Un 3% nunca envía o recibe correos electrónicos profesionales, ni mantiene conversaciones de trabajo mientras está de vacaciones
– Sólo un 15% dice tener dificultades para separar el trabajo del tiempo personal o con la familia
– Un 59% toma decisiones profesionales en casa

See on www.marketingdirecto.com