When is Media not Media? When it’s Social media

Not sure about that. We see ideas made out of it every day. Whether they are hashtags, blogs, tweets or and invitation to share based around content. Look at the success of the recent Wispa launch on Facebook, which generated thousands of comments, or the thousands who told their stories via the Barack Obama #40dollars campaign. Words and pictures used to create stories that we go on to share.

But Bailey insists that you can’t see, hear, touch, taste or smell ‘social media’ and you can’t use it to express an idea. And you can’t do this he says because “social media it isn’t media at all”. He says this because unlike traditional media you can’t make social media do what you want:

“You can’t make other people do or say what you want. People talking about ideas online is not media, it’s plain old word-of-mouth.”

So really his issue and definition of media is with control? Media is only media if you can control it? If you can buy it: buy ad space, TV spots, banner ads and poster sites?

Control and ownership is one of the definitions of traditional media and lack of it is one of definitions of social media.

Control is certainly a big issue, but lack of it doesn’t disqualify social media as media. That just makes it different.

And besides on that basis, the basis of control, are ads that we can spoof online or posters we can graffiti no longer media as control has been ceded? Or are they no longer media because they are assailed by a torrent of abusive comments and are forced offline?

It is certainly true that ideas need to be rigorously thought out. If they are not they can easily be lost control of as we have seen in recent months with Qantas and McDonald’s. Two brands both savaged on Twitter when social media campaigns when awry.

There’s also the issue that social media campaigns can, and often do, comprise numerous elements. It might be a video shared

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by @gordonmacmillan | http://wallblog.co.uk

Social media wagon is packed full of mediaInteresting piece by Nick Bailey, a creative director at digital agency AKQA Amsterdam, on why he thinks social media isn’t really media at all.

He makes a lot of good points, but I think he is also wrong as he falls into the trap of trying to directly compared traditional media and social media and of course they are different in a great many ways.

He echoes what many say about social media at the start of his piece , i.e. that it is not like traditional media. He starts out by trying to define what it is not; it is not “paper, charcoal, pencil, canvas, paint” he came across at art school; and that it is not the print media, billboards, broadcast and traditional online media that he first encountered working in the ad industry.

Media, he says, was stuff you could see, hear and touch. It was what he used express ideas, which leads him to the problem he has with “what the word ‘media’ means when it has the word ‘social’ attached to it”.

He says that while we all agree that it is important, and that it is everywhere, “no-one seems able adequately to explain is how you make an idea out of it”. Leer más “When is Media not Media? When it’s Social media”

Google: 62 Percent Of Valentine’s Day Restaurant Searches Were Mobile

Google is releasing some data on mobile search and Valentine’s Day. The company said, “A whopping 62 percent of total searches for popular national chain restaurants [in the US] on Valentine’s Day occurred on high end mobile devices or tablets.”

One more time: 62 percent of all US-based national chain restaurant queries were coming from mobile devices.

Google focused on national restaurant chains because it could disambiguate and identify them as such. It could well be that the 62 percent figure extends across the entire restaurant category.

Restaurant chain searches leading up to Valentine’s Day


by  | http://searchengineland.com

Google is releasing some data on mobile search and Valentine’s Day. The company said, “A whopping 62 percent of total searches for popular national chain restaurants [in the US] on Valentine’s Day occurred on high end mobile devices or tablets.”

One more time: 62 percent of all US-based national chain restaurant queries were coming from mobile devices.

Google focused on national restaurant chains because it could disambiguate and identify them as such. It could well be that the 62 percent figure extends across the entire restaurant category.

Restaurant chain searches leading up to Valentine’s Day

Google told me that it sometimes can’t tell what’s a restaurant search and what’s not. For example, someone searching for “radicchio” or “papaya” might be looking for a restaurant, recipes or nutrition facts. By contrast, Google knows for sure that Morton’s or McCormick & Schmick are restaurants.

Google also reported last-minute searches for flower-related terms grew 227 percent during the same week leading up to Valentine’s Day. On the day itself “Consumers were 560% more likely to click to make a call week over week.  And mobile clicks to get directions increased 514% over the same period as people were scrambling to find a nearby florist.”

Google also graphed click to call actions hour by hour on V-Day itself (w/in California), with an early peak at 8:30 am(ish) and another one during the lunch hour. Leer más “Google: 62 Percent Of Valentine’s Day Restaurant Searches Were Mobile”

Mixel Web Site 2.0

Both studios did a tremendous job, but in late December the company decided to redesign both with the goal of standardizing the page architecture and visual language. The new site, previewed here for the first time, is a much more minimal design that unifies the presentation of both with a single navigation, grid structure and interface conventions. It was designed by Khoi Vinh and Roy Stanfield.


Writen by Alexandru | http://www.topdesignmag.com

Mixel is a free app for iPad that transforms collage into a social activity. It launched in November 2011 to great reviews and was designed by CEO and co-founder Khoi Vinh (NYTimes.com, Subtraction.com). The path to launch was so intense that Mixel brought in two studios to help with the Web site: San Francisco-based Weightshift built the main site and New York City-based Gin Lane Media built the blog.

Both studios did a tremendous job, but in late December the company decided to redesign both with the goal of standardizing the page architecture and visual language. The new site, previewed here for the first time, is a much more minimal design that unifies the presentation of both with a single navigation, grid structure and interface conventions. It was designed by Khoi Vinh and Roy Stanfield.

Download Mixel here.


Leer más “Mixel Web Site 2.0”

The 10 Traits of Outstanding Leadership

This article is for parents, teachers, counselors, small business owners, managers, or anyone else who interacts with others and has some influence over them. If this is you – then you are a leader.

Having influence over people isn’t just about being in a formal position of authority. This is part of it, but influence works both ways: kids have influence over their parents, students over their teachers and spouses over each other.

What is meant by ‘leader’? Ask a hundred people and you’ll probably get a hundred different answers, although many of them will be able coercion or manipulation, since this is the experience many people have had with those in formal leadership roles. A parent may try to force a child to tidy his room; a team leader might try to push a member of his team to make more sales. But to manipulate and coerce is to misunderstand what leadership is about and, in the end, is counterproductive. The reality is that people cannot be coerced. In his book, Choice Theory, William Glasser makes the compelling case that, even in the most extreme situations, people cannot be forced into things, and that, even when coercive tactics appear to work, they do not produce the best or sustainable results. People might comply to some extent, but they will never be putting their heart into the task so long as they feel forced.

The real, and often misunderstood, job of a leader is simply this – to put people in a position to thrive. When people thrive – when they have a clear sense of purpose and are successful – they are using all their energy, achieving more and contributing fully. So how does a leader do this? Here are ten behaviors of outstanding leaders. See how you measure up.


Written by Mark Harrison | http://www.pickthebrain.com

This article is for parents, teachers, counselors, small business owners, managers, or anyone else who interacts with others and has some influence over them. If this is you – then you are a leader.

Having influence over people isn’t just about being in a formal position of authority. This is part of it, but influence works both ways: kids have influence over their parents, students over their teachers and spouses over each other.

What is meant by ‘leader’? Ask a hundred people and you’ll probably get a hundred different answers, although many of them will be able coercion or manipulation, since this is the experience many people have had with those in formal leadership roles. A parent may try to force a child to tidy his room; a team leader might try to push a member of his team to make more sales. But to manipulate and coerce is to misunderstand what leadership is about and, in the end, is counterproductive. The reality is that people cannot be coerced. In his book, Choice Theory, William Glasser makes the compelling case that, even in the most extreme situations, people cannot be forced into things, and that, even when coercive tactics appear to work, they do not produce the best or sustainable results. People might comply to some extent, but they will never be putting their heart into the task so long as they feel forced.

The real, and often misunderstood, job of a leader is simply this – to put people in a position to thrive. When people thrive – when they have a clear sense of purpose and are successful – they are using all their energy, achieving more and contributing fully. So how does a leader do this? Here are ten behaviors of outstanding leaders. See how you measure up. Leer más “The 10 Traits of Outstanding Leadership”

How to Offer an Awesome Customer Support

Cover the E-Basics

If you’ve chosen email as an option, make sure your customers can contact you through your website. This can be done several ways, depending on your needs. Small entities will need only direct email links, like support@yourcompany.com, prominently placed, as well as a Contact Us page, which is a standard requirement for e-commerce sites. Larger corporations may choose instead to implement a “ticket” system in which customers can express a concern or place an order. The ticket will then get routed to the appropriate department for follow-up.

The big daddy of help desk management is zendesk, but there are many excellent options on the market now. Search for ‘best help desk’ and you’ll see tons of great options for managing each customer support ticket or “case.”

Whatever you choose, be sure that you have a way to track the communications. Have your staff make notes about each correspondence in your CRM (customer relationship management) software. In fact, many of the more robust CRMs like Salesforce and Zohoalready have ticket systems with built-in tracking solutions. Just don’t drop the ball. Consider what happens if the person primarily responsible for email is out of the office. Who is the back-up?

If you’re the least bit technologically savvy, you can employ Google Apps as your email solution. Mail will professionally come and go from your domain, but be accessible from anywhere, and you won’t have to host an enterprise email package on in-house servers. Depending on the size of your company, Google Apps can be FREE, and there are now countless add-ons and integrations that let you run everything right out of your Google account.


Neal Lacy | http://workawesome.com
Customer SupportIn an ideal world, your customers would communicate with you only during business hours. They would peruse your website before calling you about anything, and place online orders – which you’d gleefully fill while enjoying your morning coffee. You’d never get a crabby email clearly demanding customer support, and you could disconnect your phones.

Unfortunately, the ideal world is far from reality. Your customers are anywhere in the world. They have questions about everything, including things that you’ve painstakingly outlined on your website. They’ll email you when you are closed and leave you a needy voicemail before you’ve had the opportunity to respond. Then, while you’re solving the problem, your Live Chat window will pop open, demanding your immediate attention.

Streamlining your customer communications will make your business more efficient, save you time and energy, and yield a happier customer base.

Assume Nothing, Decide What You Want to Do

Where are you now? If you’re a start-up, consider what aspects of customer “touch” you’re hoping to personally manage in-house. Don’t fall into the trap of setting up full-featured hard-wired PBX phone systems, enterprise email solutions, Live Chat interfaces, and high-touch social media outreach campaigns all at once before considering the consequences.

If you manage any of these things poorly, it will reflect negatively on your brand. It may be better to not offer Live Chat than to only make it available for a few hours a day. Consider: Does “LIVE CHAT IS CLOSED” look good on your website during the 16 hours every day and all weekend that your chat is unavailable? Similarly, it’s probably better to eliminate your email customer support if it takes two or more days for you or your staff to respond. Whatever you are going to offer, only do it if you can do it well.

So, determine what you and your team are going to do well. It’s OK if it’s only one or two things. Then, outsource the pieces that you still want to offer. Leer más “How to Offer an Awesome Customer Support”

The company behind the brand: in reputation we trust

Our study confirms that consumers make purchase decisions based on company reputation, not just on the goods or services they buy. The consuming public makes it their business to know who sells products / services they like by checking labels, doing research and showing displeasure if the company behind the brand is not readily apparent. Consumers are no longer passive or in the dark. They are in the driver’s seat. Whether they are steered by where goods are manufactured, how employees are treated, what a company is doing for (or to) the environment or a host of other reasons, consumers made it abundantly clear in our survey that they want to know where their money is going and who they are supporting by buying their goods. In this new decade of financial constraints where consumers feel that they have far less say over their economic futures than they did years ago, consumers are taking greater control over what brands they buy. They now consider
themselves rightful investors in the companies they choose to support…


http://www.webershandwick.es | Weber Shandwick es el líder mundial de las agencias de comunicación RETHINKING

CORPORATE REPUTATION

Brand

Monumental shifts in the reputation landscape today are transforming how and what companies communicate. Radical changes caused by the internet, globalisation, NGOs/third parties, diminishing returns on traditional media, a more demanding general public and increasing social activism have created a new dynamic where the company behind the brand is becoming as or more important than individual brands themselves.

As consumers around the world have greater online access to a brand’s lineage, the influence of the brand “parent” or company behind the brand matters even more. In this uncertain climate, consumers expect more from leading companies and have no trouble boycotting those that fail to live up to new standards.

At the same time, leaders need to know how to do business in an environment where consumers are not just purchasing their products or services on their own merits, but are also shopping by company reputation. The mounting convergence of brand and corporate reputation revealed in our study ushers in a new era of marketing communications.

http://www.webershandwick.es/web/app/public/reports/InRepWeTrust_r12.pdf

 

Si Pinterest es la red de las mujeres, Google+ es la de los hombres

Estos datos deberían darle a las marcas un incentivo extra a la hora de desarrollar una estrategia en Google+ si no lo han hecho todavía. Sabiendo que la red social de Google es utilizada fundamentalmente por hombres, los contenidos que las compañías pueden compartir se deberían emitir con ese dato en mente. Algunas marcas que son populares en Facebook probablemente no conseguirían tanta atracción como en Google+ ya que es aquí donde hay más hombres. Así que todo anunciante que quiera promocionar un producto o servicio para los hombres ya sabe que Google+ podría ser el sitio en el que centrar su estrategia.


http://www.marketingdirecto.com
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Con todo el interés está centrado en hablar sobre cómo el uso de Pinterest está enfocado hacia las mujeres, Google+ se posiciona, aparentemente, como una red dominada por los hombres, ya que más de dos tercios de sus usuarios son chicos. ¿Buenas noticias para los anunciantes que tengan una estrategia centrada en los hombres? Según un reciente estudio deNetworkWorld, llevado a cabo porWebsite-Monitoring.com, la red social de Google es el anti-Facebook, red en la que el 55% de los usuarios de EEUU son mujeres.

Otros datos interesantes que cabe destacar del estudio son:
– Los estudiantes son los usuarios más abundantes en Google+ por ocupación, ya que representan un 20% del total. Otras profesiones populares para Google+ incluyen ingenieros de software (2,65%), consultores (1,99%) y managers (1,72%).
– EEUU e India son los dos países con más usuarios de Google+, ya que en EEUU hay un 31,5% mientras que en India hay un 13,7%. Leer más “Si Pinterest es la red de las mujeres, Google+ es la de los hombres”