Its about people not devices

We live in exciting times. Times of innovation, invention, and rapid change. Technologies that were unthinkable years ago are now commonplace. Close to 1.5 billion people worldwide use a computer, but that figure pales in comparison to the 4.2 billion (75% of the planet) who use or have access to a mobile phone.

If you’re new to mobile design (and most people are), you may be looking for guidelines or best practices to inform your work. When you find them, they will most likely sound something like this:

* Mobile is different from traditional (primarily desktop) computing.
* The desktop is about broadband, big displays, full attention, a mouse, keyboard and comfortable seating. Mobile is about poor connections, small screens, one-handed use, glancing, interruptions, and (lately), touch screens.
* You may spend hours seated in front of the same computer, but mobile context is ever-changing. This impacts (amongst other things) the users’ locations, their attention, their access to stable connectivity, and the orientation of their devices.
* Desktop computers are ideal for consumption of lengthy content and completion of complex interactions. Mobile interactions and content should be simple, focused, and should (where possible) take advantage of unique and useful device capabilities.
* Mobile devices are personal, often carrying a wealth of photos, private data, and treasured memories. This creates unique opportunities, but privacy is also a real concern.
* There are many mobile platforms, each with its own patterns and constraints. The more you understand each platform, the better you can design for it.
* And then there are tablets. As you may have noticed, they’re larger than your average mobile device. We’re also told they’re ideal for reading.

Designing for mobile without an understanding of these key differences can lead to all sorts of problems, including clumsy interactions, high latency, poor usability, and more than a few missed opportunities to create that “long wow.” The problem however is that while these unique mobile characteristics are correct, our very concept of what constitutes a mobile device (and therefore mobile behavior) is constantly evolving.

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http://www.uxbooth.com/blog/its-about-people-not-devices/

This post is part of a series authored by the speakers of the upcoming UX London conference. As media sponsors, we’re proud to provide exclusive introductions to the topics that will comprise the event!

We live in exciting times. Times of innovation, invention, and rapid change. Technologies that were unthinkable years ago are now commonplace. Close to 1.5 billion people worldwide use a computer, but that figure pales in comparison to the 4.2 billion (75% of the planet) who use or have access to a mobile phone.

If you’re new to mobile design (and most people are), you may be looking for guidelines or best practices to inform your work. When you find them, they will most likely sound something like this:

  • Mobile is different from traditional (primarily desktop) computing.
  • The desktop is about broadband, big displays, full attention, a mouse, keyboard and comfortable seating. Mobile is about poor connections, small screens, one-handed use, glancing, interruptions, and (lately), touch screens.
  • You may spend hours seated in front of the same computer, but mobile context is ever-changing. This impacts (amongst other things) the users’ locations, their attention, their access to stable connectivity, and the orientation of their devices.
  • Desktop computers are ideal for consumption of lengthy content and completion of complex interactions. Mobile interactions and content should be simple, focused, and should (where possible) take advantage of unique and useful device capabilities.
  • Mobile devices are personal, often carrying a wealth of photos, private data, and treasured memories. This creates unique opportunities, but privacy is also a real concern.
  • There are many mobile platforms, each with its own patterns and constraints. The more you understand each platform, the better you can design for it.
  • And then there are tablets. As you may have noticed, they’re larger than your average mobile device. We’re also told they’re ideal for reading.

Designing for mobile without an understanding of these key differences can lead to all sorts of problems, including clumsy interactions, high latency, poor usability, and more than a few missed opportunities to create that “long wow.” The problem however is that while these unique mobile characteristics are correct, our very concept of what constitutes a mobile device (and therefore mobile behavior) is constantly evolving. Leer más “Its about people not devices”

30 Beautiful and Creative Ad/Marketing Agency Websites

Advertising and marketing agencies often position themselves as being specialists in creativity. So it’s just natural that their websites are often creative and beautiful. As clients expect these businesses to be creative (and a website is often one of the first things potential clients look at), ad agencies need to have effective and impressive websites.

Below is a collection of 30 agency websites from all across the globe. Take a look at these websites for creative web design inspiration.


by Emma Egan
http://sixrevisions.com/design-showcase-inspiration/30-beautiful-and-creative-admarketing-agency-websites/

 

Advertising and marketing agencies often position themselves as being specialists in creativity. So it’s just natural that their websites are often creative and beautiful. As clients expect these businesses to be creative (and a website is often one of the first things potential clients look at), ad agencies need to have effective and impressive websites.

Below is a collection of 30 agency websites from all across the globe. Take a look at these websites for creative web design inspiration.

Sponge Agency

Sponge Agency

The Holla Agency

The Holla Agency

Smart Inc.

Smart Inc.

Freckle

Freckle

CHE

BMF Agency

Zubiad

Leer más “30 Beautiful and Creative Ad/Marketing Agency Websites”

Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company

Types of Facebook Deals:

Individual Facebook Deal – To claim this type of deal, users need to only check into a venue once. When the user checks in, they click “Claim Deal,” which changes their phone screen to say, “Show phone screen at register to redeem.” Any venue offering these giveaways should be sure that the staff is well-versed on how to fulfill the deal.

The individual deal is best for venues looking to attract new visitors. Each time a person redeems a deal, it’s posted to his/her Facebook wall, making your venue front and center for his/her 100-1,000 friends.

What to be aware of: Deals are new for most users, so messaging and staff training are a necessity. Also, a major challenge for new users of Facebook check-ins is that instead of waiting for their phone to auto-populate with nearby locations, they have the option to create their own venue if they can’t find yours. If they make their own, they’ll never see your official location or your deal.


At the dismay of my friends that are not engulfed in social media, I’ve been doing quite a bit of research into LBS programs and what works and doesn’t work with each one. For the past month, I’ve been looking into Facebook Places, more specifically its new Deals program.

If you’re not up to speed, Facebook enables companies to claim their venue so when smart phone users check-in, the location is tied back to the official Facebook page (see The San Diego Museum of Art for example).

Once a company has claimed its venue, the admin of the official page can create a Facebook Deal. The challenge of marketers is to decide “which type of deal is right for my brand?” I’ve come to find there are some loopholes in some of the deals that marketers should be aware of before deciding. Leer más “Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company”

La demanda de Community Managers se multiplica por 8 en el 2010

Un análisis realizado con las ofertas de empleo publicadas a lo largo de 2010 en InfoJobs revela que el puesto de Communtiy Manager es una profesión en alza. El número de vacantes publicadas en 2010 casi se ha multiplicado por 8 respecto a las ofertadas en 2009. Los datos proporcionados por InfoJobs hacen prever que esta demanda seguirá al alza ya que en el 2010 se ofertaron un total de 164 puestos de trabajo de Community Manager frente a las 21 vacantes ofrecidas en todo el 2009.

Respecto al nivel de estudios requerido para cubrir estos puestos, más de la mitad de ofertas publicadas exige un nivel de estudios universitarios, siendo el de Licenciado el más demandado, con un 48,2% del total de las ofertas, seguido del de Máster, un 15,2%. Las licenciaturas más valoradas son Ciencias de la Comunicación, Periodismo, Marketing y Publicidad.

En cuanto a los requisitos para cubrir este puesto, el 32,3% de las vacantes exige al menos dos años de experiencia en medios de comunicación online y web 2.0 y el 25,6% un mínimo de un año trabajado en este campo. Respecto a los conocimientos, se pide saber manejar gestores de contenido y herramientas de análisis web, estar familiarizado con lenguajes de programación y de bases de datos y conocer herramientas de medición de las acciones de Social Media.


http://blog.infojobs.net/candidatos/la-demanda-de-community-managers-se-multiplica-por-8-en-el-2010

Madrid y Barcelona aglutinan la mayor parte de las ofertas publicadas con un 86,5% del total

Un análisis realizado con las ofertas de empleo publicadas a lo largo de 2010 en InfoJobs revela que el puesto de Communtiy Manager es una profesión en alza. El número de vacantes publicadas en 2010 casi se ha multiplicado por 8 respecto a las ofertadas en 2009. Los datos proporcionados por InfoJobs hacen prever que esta demanda seguirá al alza ya que en el 2010 se ofertaron un total de 164 puestos de trabajo de Community Manager frente a las 21 vacantes ofrecidas en todo el 2009.

Respecto al nivel de estudios requerido para cubrir estos puestos, más de la mitad de ofertas publicadas exige un nivel de estudios universitarios, siendo el de Licenciado el más demandado, con un 48,2% del total de las ofertas, seguido del de Máster, un 15,2%. Las licenciaturas más valoradas son Ciencias de la Comunicación, Periodismo, Marketing y Publicidad.

En cuanto a los requisitos para cubrir este puesto, el 32,3% de las vacantes exige al menos dos años de experiencia en medios de comunicación online y web 2.0 y el 25,6% un mínimo de un año trabajado en este campo. Respecto a los conocimientos, se pide saber manejar gestores de contenido y herramientas de análisis web, estar familiarizado con lenguajes de programación y de bases de datos y conocer herramientas de medición de las acciones de Social Media. Leer más “La demanda de Community Managers se multiplica por 8 en el 2010”

Ahorrar vs. Desinvertir

Las palabras son tan maleables como las ideas. Demagogia, eufemismos, en fin, verdades a medias. Un año más, la Administración General del Estado anunció recientemente una reducción de su inversión publicitaria en casi un 40%. El objetivo es ahorrar.

Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba nos lo explica para que lo entendamos bien. Se van a mantener las campañas de publicidad “imprescindibles” pero habrá que llevarlas a cabo de forma “más barata, como corresponde con la austeridad que predican los Presupuesto Generales del Estado para 2011. De hecho, estas campañas se difundirán mayoritariamente en prensa, internet, radio y televisión, por ese orden.

No me cabe ninguna duda de la importancia del ahorro en ésta y cualquier otra coyuntura. Valoro profundamente la voluntad de nuestro Gobierno de controlar el gasto y controlar el despilfarro si realmente es eso lo que se consigue. Pero, la rentablemente, bajo la palabra ahorro, a menudo, leo desinversión, que es lo menos acertado para salir de una recesión, máxime si ésta se agrava por la bajada del consumo.


Fernando Ocaña
http://www.marketingcomunidad.com/ahorrar-vs-desinvertir.html

Las palabras son tan maleables como las ideas. Demagogia, eufemismos, en fin, verdades a medias. Un año más, la Administración General del Estado anunció recientemente una reducción de su inversión publicitaria en casi un 40%. El objetivo es ahorrar.

Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba nos lo explica para que lo entendamos bien. Se van a mantener las campañas de publicidad “imprescindibles” pero habrá que llevarlas a cabo de forma “más barata, como corresponde con la austeridad que predican los Presupuesto Generales del Estado para 2011. De hecho, estas campañas se difundirán mayoritariamente en prensa, internet, radio y televisión, por ese orden.

No me cabe ninguna duda de la importancia del ahorro en ésta y cualquier otra coyuntura. Valoro profundamente la voluntad de nuestro Gobierno de controlar el gasto y controlar el despilfarro si realmente es eso lo que se consigue. Pero, la rentablemente, bajo la palabra ahorro, a menudo, leo desinversión, que es lo menos acertado para salir de una recesión, máxime si ésta se agrava por la bajada del consumo. Leer más “Ahorrar vs. Desinvertir”

Twitter Marketing Guide

By Kristi Hines
http://blog.kissmetrics.com/twitter-marketing-guide/

While Twitter may not be as big as Facebook in terms of traffic, it has several advantages over Facebook. Not only is it easier to gain followers on Twitter, but you can engage with people before they become your friend on a personal profile or your fan on a business page.

The following is a guide to help you setup your Twitter profile and implement a successful Twitter marketing strategy. It gives suggestions and tips for those who are new to Twitter or are just looking for some new ideas.
Researching the Competition

If you’re just starting out on Twitter and need a few examples to follow, why not start by doing a little research on what your competition (or colleagues, if you prefer) are doing in the Twitterverse.

I can *almost* guarantee that there is a similar blogger, freelancer, entrepreneur, local business, or any-sized business already out there taking advantage of Twitter. You can find them by visiting their websites or using directories such as Twellow and Wefollow to search for Twitter users in a specific industry.

Be sure to find the best examples to follow – if you’re a local bakery, and your competition down the road isn’t on Twitter (or only has 3 followers), then try broadening your searching for a local bakery in a larger city. Once you’ve found them, follow them and see what they do. Note what seems to get a good response and what doesn’t.

For more tips on researching the competition, I wrote a post here a few months back called 7 sneaky ways to use Twitter to spy on your competition. Be sure to check it out to see what you can learn from others in your field!


twitter-marketing-guide

While Twitter may not be as big as Facebook in terms of traffic, it has several advantages over Facebook. Not only is it easier to gain followers on Twitter, but you can engage with people before they become your friend on a personal profile or your fan on a business page.

The following is a guide to help you setup your Twitter profile and implement a successful Twitter marketing strategy. It gives suggestions and tips for those who are new to Twitter or are just looking for some new ideas.

Researching the Competition

If you’re just starting out on Twitter and need a few examples to follow, why not start by doing a little research on what your competition (or colleagues, if you prefer) are doing in the Twitterverse.

I can *almost* guarantee that there is a similar blogger, freelancer, entrepreneur, local business, or any-sized business already out there taking advantage of Twitter. You can find them by visiting their websites or using directories such as Twellow and Wefollow to search for Twitter users in a specific industry.

Be sure to find the best examples to follow – if you’re a local bakery, and your competition down the road isn’t on Twitter (or only has 3 followers), then try broadening your searching for a local bakery in a larger city. Once you’ve found them, follow them and see what they do. Note what seems to get a good response and what doesn’t.

For more tips on researching the competition, I wrote a post here a few months back called 7 sneaky ways to use Twitter to spy on your competition. Be sure to check it out to see what you can learn from others in your field! Leer más “Twitter Marketing Guide”

Subject line inspiration: where to get it

Ah…subject lines!

We do know an awful lot about what they should achieve and how.

But I also know what a painting should achieve and the key role of brush, paint and canvas. Yet, curiously, none of my efforts are hanging in the Louvre (last time I checked).

Sometimes we need to see what others are doing before we turn theory into practice. So following on from an earlier post on sites to inspire your design and tactics, here some resources to help you construct that winning subject line:
Subject line collections and campaign databases

Chad White’s near daily “AM Inbox” posts at the Retail Email Blog include the “subjectivity scanner”: a list of notable subject lines from that day’s retail emails. Be sure to also see the Subject Line Halls of Fame, dating back to 2006.

The VerticalResponse blog also regularly features collections of themed subject lines. For example:

* 50 All-Time Great Retail Subject Lines
* 29 Great B2B Subject Lines
* 20 Holiday Subject Lines

Subject lines are also a particular feature of the Email Institute’s gallery and the eDataSource, Emailium, Email Campaign Archive and Emailtastic campaign databases.
Twitter

Tweets with links need to get people to click while staying under 140 characters in length. Driving action in just a few words? Hmmm…sounds a lot like the subject line challenge.

Track the tweets of top stores, bloggers and media sites to see how they make use of limited space to get a response. For example:

* Dell Outlet and Amazon.com Deals on Twitter
* The “No turn on red” retail blog aggregates tweets from top retail and ecommerce Twitter accounts on this page
* The 100 most influential news media accounts
* Twittorati.com aggregates the tweets of the world’s top bloggers

In particular, when an article or offer is published look for other people retweeting the message. Many simply repeat the original tweet verbatim. Some will rewrite the headline and often improve on the original.

I’ve learnt much about headline writing from how others tweet about my articles.


By Mark Brownlow
http://www.email-marketing-reports.com/iland/2011/02/subject-line-inspiration.html

newspaper headlinesAh…subject lines!

We do know an awful lot about what they should achieve and how.

But I also know what a painting should achieve and the key role of brush, paint and canvas. Yet, curiously, none of my efforts are hanging in the Louvre (last time I checked).

Sometimes we need to see what others are doing before we turn theory into practice. So following on from an earlier post on sites to inspire your design and tactics, here some resources to help you construct that winning subject line:

Subject line collections and campaign databases

Chad White’s near daily “AM Inbox” posts at the Retail Email Blog include the “subjectivity scanner”: a list of notable subject lines from that day’s retail emails. Be sure to also see the Subject Line Halls of Fame, dating back to 2006.

The VerticalResponse blog also regularly features collections of themed subject lines. For example:

Subject lines are also a particular feature of the Email Institute’s gallery and the eDataSourceEmailiumEmail Campaign Archive and Emailtastic campaign databases.

Twitter

Tweets with links need to get people to click while staying under 140 characters in length. Driving action in just a few words? Hmmm…sounds a lot like the subject line challenge.

Track the tweets of top stores, bloggers and media sites to see how they make use of limited space to get a response. For example:

In particular, when an article or offer is published look for other people retweeting the message. Many simply repeat the original tweet verbatim. Some will rewrite the headline and often improve on the original.

I’ve learnt much about headline writing from how others tweet about my articles. Leer más “Subject line inspiration: where to get it”