Are You a Freelancer Or a Consultant?

“Are you a freelancer or a consultant?”

That may seem like an odd question, especially since this blog IS called “Freelance” Folder.

In fact, many people confuse freelancers with consultants and vice versa. There is a distinction and it is an important one. It matters how you position and brand yourself.

It’s Just a Title…Or Is It?

Why does it even matter if you brand yourself as a freelancer or a consultant?


http://freelancefolder.com/are-you-a-freelancer-or-a-consultant/

Freelancer or Consultant “Are you a freelancer or a consultant?”

That may seem like an odd question, especially since this blog IS called “Freelance” Folder.

In fact, many people confuse freelancers with consultants and vice versa. There is a distinction and it is an important one. It matters how you position and brand yourself.

It’s Just a Title…Or Is It?

Why does it even matter if you brand yourself as a freelancer or a consultant? Leer más “Are You a Freelancer Or a Consultant?”

What If There Was No Marketing?

Imagine if you would for a moment a world where there was no focus on marketing and promotion. No television or radio commercials. No websites cluttered with more ads than content. No magazines with countless pages of slick photographs of impossibly beautiful people or food that never looks as delicious in person, with an occasional article actually inserted now and then. No free e-books, trial periods or other promises once you turn over your invaluable email address. No landing pages utilizing tried and proven language and tactics to rope in the naïve and trusting. No experts or gurus or entire industries built on finding ways to drive more traffic, strengthen brands, increase numbers, and sell products.

I’m not sure how anyone would know that anything existed without its promotion of some sort, but what if that promotion was driven not by a need for self, but instead by a desire to give?


http://www.bkmacdaddy.com/blog/what-if-there-was-no-marketing

what-if-there-were-no-marketingImagine if you would for a moment a world where there was no focus on marketing and promotion. No television or radio commercials. No websites cluttered with more ads than content. No magazines with countless pages of slick photographs of impossibly beautiful people or food that never looks as delicious in person, with an occasional article actually inserted now and then. No free e-books, trial periods or other promises once you turn over your invaluable email address. No landing pages utilizing tried and proven language and tactics to rope in the naïve and trusting. No experts or gurus or entire industries built on finding ways to drive more traffic, strengthen brands, increase numbers, and sell products.

I’m not sure how anyone would know that anything existed without its promotion of some sort, but what if that promotion was driven not by a need for self, but instead by a desire to give? Leer más “What If There Was No Marketing?”

Creative sites? Yes, but maybe unusable

It’s a hotly debated issue on several forums and blogs of the sector and that often divides the mass of web designers in two different and opposing factions: I’m talking about the aesthetic aspect of a site and on how it’s appearing in one way rather than in another can enhance or on the contrary limit its potentialities and effectiveness.

A site must only give information and has to do so in the most direct and simplest way possible, as someone says. This is true, but –replies somebody else- it is also important how such information is transmitted and how through shapes and colours, stimulates the curiosity and the interest of the consumer. [Más…] Who begins as a graphic is more likely to believe also that the web design is first of all communication and as such there are strategies and aesthetics needs that cannot be denied: that particular font is more elegant and capable of capturing the attention in one precise point of the layout, this combination of colours makes more confident the reading, that background image has nothing special, but it’s attractive and makes the page more appealing.

Communication , yes, but in a creative way because showcases on the web know how to sell and attract consensus, as already required by a billboard or by a leaflet. Communicate and if possible surprise, dare, create something new and unique , experiment with styles and colours and create something that is not only simple to use but also –above all, perhaps- beautiful to see.

On the other hand, where the concepts of aesthetics and of the “appearing” are just little concrete theories – the idea that a good graphic isn’t a crucial detail of a functional site is becoming more and more popular, indeed. It’s rumoured that graphics are almost an useless distraction, a disorder that make the pages of a site heavy, not accessible, less usable, slow to upload, …etcetera, etcetera.

The general comment, lavished almost as an alibi? “Maybe the sites I do aren’t really that appealing , but at least they’re usable!”, as if one thing could exclude somehow the other.

The reality is that an effective site is yes a usable site and easy to consult, but not only. A white page with textual content, without images and with an elementary browser, is certainly easy to use and to read, but what would the web be if every site was a white screen containing text and nothing else? What would a commercial spot be without the beauty of images at high emotional impact , or without an appropriate background noise? And we should also ask ourselves: but what do we really remember, for example, of these ads, what stroked us, the subject –even if it was a detergent or a car doesn’t care- or the sounds, the words and the colours with which it was advertised?

We already know the answer.


It’s a hotly debated issue on several forums and blogs of the sector and that often divides the mass of web designers in two different and opposing factions: I’m talking about the aesthetic aspect of a site and on how it’s appearing in one way rather than in another can enhance or on the contrary limit its potentialities and effectiveness.

A site must only give information and has to do so in the most direct and simplest way possible, as someone says. This is true, but –replies somebody else- it is also important how such information is transmitted  and how through shapes and colours, stimulates the curiosity and the interest of the consumer. Leer más “Creative sites? Yes, but maybe unusable”

Don’t Fail Fast – Learn Fast

There is a lot of chatter out there about the concept of ‘failing fast’ as a way of fostering innovation and reducing risk. Sometimes the concept of ‘failing fast’ is merged with ‘failing cheap’ to form the following refrain – ‘fail fast, fail cheap, fail often’.

Now don’t get me wrong, one of the most important things an organization can do is learn to accept failure as a real possibility in their innovation efforts, and even to plan for it by taking a portfolio approach that balances different risk profiles, time horizons, etc.

The problem that I have with all of this chatter about failing fast is that does not take into account the power of language. The language focuses people on failing instead of on the goal – learning. My friend Stefan Lindegaard has recognized this and has incorporated learning into his ‘smartfailing‘. But even this approach misses the mark by remaining focused on failure.

When it comes to innovation, it is not as important whether you fail fast or fail slow or whether you fail at all, but how fast you learn. And make no mistake, you don’t have to fail to innovate (although there are always some obstacles along the way). With the right approach to innovation you can learn quickly from failures AND successes.

The key is to pursue your innovation efforts as a discrete set of experiments designed to learn certain things, and instrumenting each project phase in such a way that the desired learning is achieved.


by Braden Kelley

Don't Fail Fast - Learn FastThere is a lot of chatter out there about the concept of ‘failing fast’ as a way of fostering innovation and reducing risk. Sometimes the concept of ‘failing fast’ is merged with ‘failing cheap’ to form the following refrain – ‘fail fast, fail cheap, fail often’.

Now don’t get me wrong, one of the most important things an organization can do is learn to accept failure as a real possibility in their innovation efforts, and even to plan for it by taking a portfolio approach that balances different risk profiles, time horizons, etc.

The problem that I have with all of this chatter about failing fast is that does not take into account the power of language. The language focuses people on failing instead of on the goal – learning. My friend Stefan Lindegaard has recognized this and has incorporated learning into his ‘smartfailing‘. But even this approach misses the mark by remaining focused on failure.

When it comes to innovation, it is not as important whether you fail fast or fail slow or whether you fail at all, but how fast you learn. And make no mistake, you don’t have to fail to innovate (although there are always some obstacles along the way). With the right approach to innovation you can learn quickly from failures AND successes.

The key is to pursue your innovation efforts as a discrete set of experiments designed to learn certain things, and instrumenting each project phase in such a way that the desired learning is achieved.

The central question should always be: Leer más “Don’t Fail Fast – Learn Fast”