Are You a Freelancer Or a Consultant?

“Are you a freelancer or a consultant?”

That may seem like an odd question, especially since this blog IS called “Freelance” Folder.

In fact, many people confuse freelancers with consultants and vice versa. There is a distinction and it is an important one. It matters how you position and brand yourself.

It’s Just a Title…Or Is It?

Why does it even matter if you brand yourself as a freelancer or a consultant?


http://freelancefolder.com/are-you-a-freelancer-or-a-consultant/

Freelancer or Consultant “Are you a freelancer or a consultant?”

That may seem like an odd question, especially since this blog IS called “Freelance” Folder.

In fact, many people confuse freelancers with consultants and vice versa. There is a distinction and it is an important one. It matters how you position and brand yourself.

It’s Just a Title…Or Is It?

Why does it even matter if you brand yourself as a freelancer or a consultant? Leer más “Are You a Freelancer Or a Consultant?”

What If There Was No Marketing?

Imagine if you would for a moment a world where there was no focus on marketing and promotion. No television or radio commercials. No websites cluttered with more ads than content. No magazines with countless pages of slick photographs of impossibly beautiful people or food that never looks as delicious in person, with an occasional article actually inserted now and then. No free e-books, trial periods or other promises once you turn over your invaluable email address. No landing pages utilizing tried and proven language and tactics to rope in the naïve and trusting. No experts or gurus or entire industries built on finding ways to drive more traffic, strengthen brands, increase numbers, and sell products.

I’m not sure how anyone would know that anything existed without its promotion of some sort, but what if that promotion was driven not by a need for self, but instead by a desire to give?


http://www.bkmacdaddy.com/blog/what-if-there-was-no-marketing

what-if-there-were-no-marketingImagine if you would for a moment a world where there was no focus on marketing and promotion. No television or radio commercials. No websites cluttered with more ads than content. No magazines with countless pages of slick photographs of impossibly beautiful people or food that never looks as delicious in person, with an occasional article actually inserted now and then. No free e-books, trial periods or other promises once you turn over your invaluable email address. No landing pages utilizing tried and proven language and tactics to rope in the naïve and trusting. No experts or gurus or entire industries built on finding ways to drive more traffic, strengthen brands, increase numbers, and sell products.

I’m not sure how anyone would know that anything existed without its promotion of some sort, but what if that promotion was driven not by a need for self, but instead by a desire to give? Leer más “What If There Was No Marketing?”

Creative sites? Yes, but maybe unusable

It’s a hotly debated issue on several forums and blogs of the sector and that often divides the mass of web designers in two different and opposing factions: I’m talking about the aesthetic aspect of a site and on how it’s appearing in one way rather than in another can enhance or on the contrary limit its potentialities and effectiveness.

A site must only give information and has to do so in the most direct and simplest way possible, as someone says. This is true, but –replies somebody else- it is also important how such information is transmitted and how through shapes and colours, stimulates the curiosity and the interest of the consumer. [Más…] Who begins as a graphic is more likely to believe also that the web design is first of all communication and as such there are strategies and aesthetics needs that cannot be denied: that particular font is more elegant and capable of capturing the attention in one precise point of the layout, this combination of colours makes more confident the reading, that background image has nothing special, but it’s attractive and makes the page more appealing.

Communication , yes, but in a creative way because showcases on the web know how to sell and attract consensus, as already required by a billboard or by a leaflet. Communicate and if possible surprise, dare, create something new and unique , experiment with styles and colours and create something that is not only simple to use but also –above all, perhaps- beautiful to see.

On the other hand, where the concepts of aesthetics and of the “appearing” are just little concrete theories – the idea that a good graphic isn’t a crucial detail of a functional site is becoming more and more popular, indeed. It’s rumoured that graphics are almost an useless distraction, a disorder that make the pages of a site heavy, not accessible, less usable, slow to upload, …etcetera, etcetera.

The general comment, lavished almost as an alibi? “Maybe the sites I do aren’t really that appealing , but at least they’re usable!”, as if one thing could exclude somehow the other.

The reality is that an effective site is yes a usable site and easy to consult, but not only. A white page with textual content, without images and with an elementary browser, is certainly easy to use and to read, but what would the web be if every site was a white screen containing text and nothing else? What would a commercial spot be without the beauty of images at high emotional impact , or without an appropriate background noise? And we should also ask ourselves: but what do we really remember, for example, of these ads, what stroked us, the subject –even if it was a detergent or a car doesn’t care- or the sounds, the words and the colours with which it was advertised?

We already know the answer.


It’s a hotly debated issue on several forums and blogs of the sector and that often divides the mass of web designers in two different and opposing factions: I’m talking about the aesthetic aspect of a site and on how it’s appearing in one way rather than in another can enhance or on the contrary limit its potentialities and effectiveness.

A site must only give information and has to do so in the most direct and simplest way possible, as someone says. This is true, but –replies somebody else- it is also important how such information is transmitted  and how through shapes and colours, stimulates the curiosity and the interest of the consumer. Leer más “Creative sites? Yes, but maybe unusable”

Don’t Fail Fast – Learn Fast

There is a lot of chatter out there about the concept of ‘failing fast’ as a way of fostering innovation and reducing risk. Sometimes the concept of ‘failing fast’ is merged with ‘failing cheap’ to form the following refrain – ‘fail fast, fail cheap, fail often’.

Now don’t get me wrong, one of the most important things an organization can do is learn to accept failure as a real possibility in their innovation efforts, and even to plan for it by taking a portfolio approach that balances different risk profiles, time horizons, etc.

The problem that I have with all of this chatter about failing fast is that does not take into account the power of language. The language focuses people on failing instead of on the goal – learning. My friend Stefan Lindegaard has recognized this and has incorporated learning into his ‘smartfailing‘. But even this approach misses the mark by remaining focused on failure.

When it comes to innovation, it is not as important whether you fail fast or fail slow or whether you fail at all, but how fast you learn. And make no mistake, you don’t have to fail to innovate (although there are always some obstacles along the way). With the right approach to innovation you can learn quickly from failures AND successes.

The key is to pursue your innovation efforts as a discrete set of experiments designed to learn certain things, and instrumenting each project phase in such a way that the desired learning is achieved.


by Braden Kelley

Don't Fail Fast - Learn FastThere is a lot of chatter out there about the concept of ‘failing fast’ as a way of fostering innovation and reducing risk. Sometimes the concept of ‘failing fast’ is merged with ‘failing cheap’ to form the following refrain – ‘fail fast, fail cheap, fail often’.

Now don’t get me wrong, one of the most important things an organization can do is learn to accept failure as a real possibility in their innovation efforts, and even to plan for it by taking a portfolio approach that balances different risk profiles, time horizons, etc.

The problem that I have with all of this chatter about failing fast is that does not take into account the power of language. The language focuses people on failing instead of on the goal – learning. My friend Stefan Lindegaard has recognized this and has incorporated learning into his ‘smartfailing‘. But even this approach misses the mark by remaining focused on failure.

When it comes to innovation, it is not as important whether you fail fast or fail slow or whether you fail at all, but how fast you learn. And make no mistake, you don’t have to fail to innovate (although there are always some obstacles along the way). With the right approach to innovation you can learn quickly from failures AND successes.

The key is to pursue your innovation efforts as a discrete set of experiments designed to learn certain things, and instrumenting each project phase in such a way that the desired learning is achieved.

The central question should always be: Leer más “Don’t Fail Fast – Learn Fast”

Four Innovation Predictions for 2011

For those of you who receive our newsletter, these predictions are the same ones we made in our December 2010 edition. For those who don’t know about the newsletter or our yearly predictions about innovation, please read ahead.

Keeping with the publishing traditions that demand that most articles in December relate to a “top ten” list from the year just past or predictions about the near future, each year we boldly stake out several predictions about the future of innovation. Each year we also recap the predictions we got right, and wrong, from the previous year. For 2011, we’re making the following predictions about innovation:

1. Ideas come from everywhere – “open” innovation is ubiquitous
2. Experience is more important than product – the outcomes change from new products to new experiences
3. Timeframes shorten – while organizations are getting better at generating ideas, the timeframe from idea to commercialization hasn’t changed.
4. Creativity re-enters the workforce.

Let’s look at each of these in turn and describe why we think they’ll occur and why they matter…


Thnxs to Blogging Innovation | http://www.business-strategy-innovation.com
Hosted by
Braden Kelley

 

by Jeffrey Phillips

Four Innovation Predictions for 2011For those of you who receive our newsletter, these predictions are the same ones we made in our December 2010 edition. For those who don’t know about the newsletter or our yearly predictions about innovation, please read ahead.

Keeping with the publishing traditions that demand that most articles in December relate to a “top ten” list from the year just past or predictions about the near future, each year we boldly stake out several predictions about the future of innovation. Each year we also recap the predictions we got right, and wrong, from the previous year. For 2011, we’re making the following predictions about innovation:

  1. Ideas come from everywhere – “open” innovation is ubiquitous
  2. Experience is more important than product – the outcomes change from new products to new experiences
  3. Timeframes shorten – while organizations are getting better at generating ideas, the timeframe from idea to commercialization hasn’t changed.
  4. Creativity re-enters the workforce.

Let’s look at each of these in turn and describe why we think they’ll occur and why they matter… Leer más “Four Innovation Predictions for 2011”

Leadership and management

The approaches that we do, to meet the challenges inherent in organizational culture, when we turn to outside, to open innovation put some leadership questions.

Executives on strategic functions when they want to embrace open innovation can face the future with lack of security. But managing the tension between control and collaboration between technical contributions and management can resolve personal and organizational conflicts.

This leadership, i.e. the members of the organization which plays such a role, in addition to establish the direction that developers should follow must ensure that the resources meet the needs of planned activities.


The five dimensions of Meta-leadership as deve...

Thnxs to   abaldaia.wordpress.com | Intuinovare

The approaches that we do, to meet the challenges inherent in organizational culture, when we turn to outside, to open innovation put some leadership questions.

Executives on strategic functions when they want to embrace open innovation can face the future with lack of security. But managing the tension between control and collaboration between technical contributions and management can resolve personal and organizational conflicts.

This leadership, i.e. the members of the organization which plays such a role, in addition to establish the direction that developers should follow must ensure that the resources meet the needs of planned activities. Leer más “Leadership and management”

End of Year Innovation Questions

As you may have already guessed, John and I are mentally wiped out right now and are taking a short break from blogging. We’re saving up ideas and posts and will be ready to go again once the new year starts.

In the meantime, here are a few questions to consider. If you’d like to answer them in the comments, it would be fun to have a discussion on these issues:

1. What’s the most innovative thing you’ve done this year?
2. What will you do next year to build on this year’s success?
3. What is your greatest innovation challenge right now?


Thnxs to Tim Kastelle & John Steen | Innovation Leadership Network
http://timkastelle.org

As you may have already guessed, John and I are mentally wiped out right now and are taking a short break from blogging. We’re saving up ideas and posts and will be ready to go again once the new year starts.

In the meantime, here are a few questions to consider. If you’d like to answer them in the comments, it would be fun to have a discussion on these issues:

  1. What’s the most innovative thing you’ve done this year?
  2. What will you do next year to build on this year’s success?
  3. What is your greatest innovation challenge right now? Leer más “End of Year Innovation Questions”

The Most Expensive Football Shirt Deal in History

Ever since I visited the amazing city of Barcelona (if you’ve never been you’re missing out – only £59 return now from UK!) I’ve always had a great deal of respect for their football club that, unlike others, is owned by it’s members (a little bit like a co-operative). It is this team spirit that originally lead to the inspirational sponsorship coup that got them involved with Unicef. But tough times call for tough measures and ethics only take you so far…

It was announced last month that from July 2011 to June 2016, FC Barcelona will wear a hybrid of the logo of the non-profit Qatar Foundation and the familiar UNICEF logo on their shirts. “Our marketing experts are working at unifying the Unicef and the Qatar logos,” said vice-president Faus of the deal, worth 30 million euros per season (plus bonuses for titles won), currently the highest of any European football club. England losing their world cup bid in such dramatic fashion (Russian and Qatar had their bids accepted instead) made this deal even harder for me to digest.

Although it’s not quite as bad as hawking the shirt to the first betting company that comes calling, it certainly disagrees with the Barça spirit and has many fans up in arms for what they considering a selling-out of the charitable, ‘Mes que un club’ spirit.


Ever since I visited the amazing city of Barcelona (if you’ve never been you’re missing out – only £59 return now from UK!) I’ve always had a great deal of respect for their football club that, unlike others, is owned by it’s members (a little bit like a co-operative).  It is this team spirit that originally lead to the inspirational sponsorship coup that got them involved with Unicef.  But tough times call for tough measures and ethics only take you so far…

It was announced last month that from July 2011 to June 2016, FC Barcelona will wear a hybrid of the logo of the non-profit Qatar Foundation and the familiar UNICEF logo on their shirts. “Our marketing experts are working at unifying the Unicef and the Qatar logos,” said vice-president Faus of the deal, worth 30 million euros per season (plus bonuses for titles won), currently the highest of any European football club.  England losing their world cup bid in such dramatic fashion (Russian and Qatar had their bids accepted instead) made this deal even harder for me to digest.

Although it’s not quite as bad as hawking the shirt to the first betting company that comes calling, it certainly disagrees with the Barça spirit and has many fans up in arms for what they considering a selling-out of the charitable, ‘Mes que un club’ spirit. Leer más “The Most Expensive Football Shirt Deal in History”

36 Tips to Build An Explosive Brand Using ONLY Social Media

A few random thoughts in no particular order. Hopefully you will find some of them useful. At the very least, they may kick-start some interesting conversations within your own company…

1. Facebook applications still work. I’ve seen spends as little as $10,000 generate over 5m hits when targeted properly.
2. 300,000 people join Twitter everyday. If you’ve not got a “conversation strategy“, get one!
3. FourSquare WILL be huge. Plan to use it alongside your next event, festival or product launch.
4. The biggest website for 2011 will be http://search.twitter. Find out where your customers are and talk to them.
5. You should be on Google Blog search everyday, interacting with customers in your industry and leaving comments on their blogs.
6. Become friends of EVERY Facebook fan page relevant to your brand. (And then find something relevant and interesting to say).
7. The fastest growing brands tweet between 20-30 times per day. (That’s only a lot of tweets if you’ve got nothing good to say).
8. If you don’t know what to tweet about – Trendsmap is a good place to start for high-traffic keywords.
9. The worlds biggest brands (like Coca-Cola) have up to 30 times more traffic on Facebook than they do on their own website.
10. Use the 80/20 rule. 80% leaving comments and remarks everywhere / 20% generating your own content.


A few random thoughts in no particular order.  Hopefully you will find some of them useful.  At the very least, they may kick-start some interesting conversations within your own company…

  1. Facebook applications still work. I’ve seen spends as little as $10,000 generate over 5m hits when targeted properly.
  2. 300,000 people join Twitter everyday. If you’ve not got a “conversation strategy“, get one!
  3. FourSquare WILL be huge. Plan to use it alongside your next event, festival or product launch.
  4. The biggest website for 2011 will be http://search.twitter. Find out where your customers are and talk to them.
  5. You should be on Google Blog search everyday, interacting with customers in your industry and leaving comments on their blogs.
  6. Become friends of EVERY Facebook fan page relevant to your brand. (And then find something relevant and interesting to say).
  7. The fastest growing brands tweet between 20-30 times per day. (That’s only a lot of tweets if you’ve got nothing good to say).
  8. If you don’t know what to tweet about – Trendsmap is a good place to start for high-traffic keywords.
  9. The worlds biggest brands (like Coca-Cola) have up to 30 times more traffic on Facebook than they do on their own website.
  10. Use the 80/20 rule. 80% leaving comments and remarks everywhere / 20% generating your own content. Leer más “36 Tips to Build An Explosive Brand Using ONLY Social Media”