Stop the FAQ Page Bandage

Where Did the FAQ Page Come From?

We can look at the FAQ page as one of the early and rudimentary conceptualizations of user-centered websites. The FAQ page was the webmaster’s (that’s what they called themselves back in the day) only way to address the needs of the masses. Before Twitter, Facebook, or even contact forms, users who had questions about a site or a piece of information were simply and sadly out of luck.

The only thing that stood between them and giving up was a list of questions sites always seemed to have; and maybe, just maybe, their question would be included in the list.

In the days of the early web, the FAQ page was a powerful tool for keeping site visitors happy. And while the web has certainly evolved since then, for the most part, the FAQ page has not.


by Jason Gross
http://sixrevisions.com/user-interface/stop-the-faq-page-bandage/

Stop the FAQ Page Bandage

The evolution of the web and the way in which we design for it has brought around all kinds of patterns, standards and best practices. Sites have a relatively uniform information structure: We always start with a home page (also known as the front page or index page) as the default page, and we’ll have common pages such as a contact page, an about page, and so forth.

A lot of sites will have a web page dedicated to problem-solving, giving answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ). In a time where interactivity between the site operator and site visitors is at the forefront, and a time where site analytics allow us to know more about user behavior than ever before — has the FAQ page, been left behind? Leer más “Stop the FAQ Page Bandage”

5 Rules for Mindful Creativity

Necessity may have been “the mother of invention” back when Plato dropped the famous phrase, but necessity alone is no longer a sufficient reason for creation. Inventions that seem to embody a forward-thinking approach at their inception often appear backwards in their thinking given a few years (or decades) of reflection. Take, for instance, the advent of individually packaged goods, which made food conveniently transportable at the expense of using more materials and creating more waste for landfills. The desire to make the world and the objects that surround us stronger, faster, more convenient and more beautiful serves as constant inspiration for today’s creative problem solvers. But sometimes, as with single-use packaging or the more complicated case of CFL lightbulbs, the innovative solutions we arrive at create other problems, or even predicaments, that become evident only in hindsight.


Necessity may have been “the mother of invention” back when Plato dropped the famous phrase, but necessity alone is no longer a sufficient reason for creation. Inventions that seem to embody a forward-thinking approach at their inception often appear backwards in their thinking given a few years (or decades) of reflection. Take, for instance, the advent of individually packaged goods, which made food conveniently transportable at the expense of using more materials and creating more waste for landfills. The desire to make the world and the objects that surround us stronger, faster, more convenient and more beautiful serves as constant inspiration for today’s creative problem solvers. But sometimes, as with single-use packaging or the more complicated case of CFL lightbulbs, the innovative solutions we arrive at create other problems, or even predicaments, that become evident only in hindsight.
Leer más “5 Rules for Mindful Creativity”

10 Usability Tips for Web Designers

Simply put, usability is making your website easy for your visitors to find the information they need when they need it.

A common misconception about usability amongst web companies is that usability is expensive. Yes, there are multi-national companies that spend thousands of dollars on usability tests and research, but for an everyday company usability is achievable without the knowledge of usability experts or without expensive equipment for testing.

Web designers have an even easier job to do, just by reading usability articles they can accumulate a fairly good knowledge about usability basics and how to implement them on a website.


http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2008/12/10-usability-tips-for-web-designers/

Simply put, usability is making your website easy for your visitors to find the information they need when they need it.

A common misconception about usability amongst web companies is that usability is expensive. Yes, there are multi-national companies that spend thousands of dollars on usability tests and research, but for an everyday company usability is achievable without the knowledge of usability experts or without expensive equipment for testing.

Web designers have an even easier job to do, just by reading usability articles they can accumulate a fairly good knowledge about usability basics and how to implement them on a website.

1. Include a TaglineLeer más “10 Usability Tips for Web Designers”

Why Joe Client Doesn’t Care About Standards

Web standards should be a driving force behind the work of any designer or developer. They provide a scale against which to measure the quality, structure, syntax and methodology of design work.

To explain the benefits of web standards, I’ve compared on my own blog the landscape of the web today with that of 10 to 15 years ago.

Questions related to cross-browser compliance and the necessity of testing extensively before launching still linger, but the standardization of DOM, (X)HTML, CSS and a number of other technologies has made the digital world much more predictable.


thumbhttp://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2010/11/why-joe-client-doesn%E2%80%99t-care-about-standards/

Web standards should be a driving force behind the work of any designer or developer. They provide a scale against which to measure the quality, structure, syntax and methodology of design work.

To explain the benefits of web standards, I’ve compared on my own blog the landscape of the web today with that of 10 to 15 years ago.

Questions related to cross-browser compliance and the necessity of testing extensively before launching still linger, but the standardization of DOM, (X)HTML, CSS and a number of other technologies has made the digital world much more predictable. Leer más “Why Joe Client Doesn’t Care About Standards”

Minimalism in Web Design: Clear Perfection

Minimalist designs make the simple things simple, and the complex things possible. My aim is to combine simple elegance and functionality to a timeless form. – Xavier Lust.

Minimalism as a web design trend came back not long ago. It was a move away from gaudy, elaborate graphics and design schemes, and a shift back towards simple, understated design. It was a comeback of the design at its most basic and simple elements, free from superfluous shapes and complex color combinations.

I would have written a shorter letter, but I didn’t have the time. – Mark Twain.

Jonathan Ive
Jonathan Ive
Aspects and Features of a Modern Minimal Web Design

In today’s world web minimalism is still all the rage, and the main reason of the trend’s popularity is people’s love for friendly and lightweight yet stylish and unobtrusive simple designs. By simple is not meant primitive. Some of the websites with minimalistic design have a number of shiny effects and use advanced forms of CSS and Ajax. But they seem to favor a cleaner, more clutter-free experience, and put a premium on white space.

So, what are the main distinctive features and aspects that make a modern web design minimalistic?

It is too easy for novices, too difficult for professionals. – A saying about playing Mozart.

Minimizing Content

The core function of a minimalistic design is to be able to present a clear message to the visitors. In order to achieve that, it is necessary to re-think the content and modify it to meet the design’s requirements. You’ll have to remove most of the graphic elements and images, but you should do it wisely, because it is very easy to go too far in an attempt to simplify the layout therefore you risk making the design boring.


By: Tina Zennand
http://www.onextrapixel.com/2010/11/19/minimalism-in-web-design-clear-perfection/

Minimalism in art appeared in the late 1960’s. The main principle of the movement is simplicity in form and content; in order to achieve this, personal expression is removed. The aim of minimalism artists is to build their compositions in such a way that visitors perceive the artwork as deeper and more intense.

It can be achieved by making the themes clear from clutter. Minimalism is often manifested as abstract art, but it can also be very beautiful.

Minimalism in Web Design: Clear Perfection
Image credit: Todd Klassy

Minimalism as a Web Design

Minimalist designs make the simple things simple, and the complex things possible. My aim is to combine simple elegance and functionality to a timeless form. – Xavier Lust.

Minimalism as a web design trend came back not long ago. It was a move away from gaudy, elaborate graphics and design schemes, and a shift back towards simple, understated design. It was a comeback of the design at its most basic and simple elements, free from superfluous shapes and complex color combinations.

I would have written a shorter letter, but I didn’t have the time. – Mark Twain.

Jonathan Ive
Jonathan Ive

Aspects and Features of a Modern Minimal Web Design

In today’s world web minimalism is still all the rage, and the main reason of the trend’s popularity is people’s love for friendly and lightweight yet stylish and unobtrusive simple designs. By simple is not meant primitive. Some of the websites with minimalistic design have a number of shiny effects and use advanced forms of CSS and Ajax. But they seem to favor a cleaner, more clutter-free experience, and put a premium on white space.

So, what are the main distinctive features and aspects that make a modern web design minimalistic?

It is too easy for novices, too difficult for professionals. – A saying about playing Mozart.

Minimizing Content

The core function of a minimalistic design is to be able to present a clear message to the visitors. In order to achieve that, it is necessary to re-think the content and modify it to meet the design’s requirements. You’ll have to remove most of the graphic elements and images, but you should do it wisely, because it is very easy to go too far in an attempt to simplify the layout therefore you risk making the design boring. Leer más “Minimalism in Web Design: Clear Perfection”

Google Releases an E-Book About the Internet (But Still No Book Store)

Time’s running out on that plan. Sandoval noted that Google could miss the holiday season and fall behind in a race against Apple, Amazon and Barnes & Noble. That seems like a given now.

But who knows? Maybe “20 Things” is a hint that Google’s e-book plans are coming together. The interface was nice, and I enjoyed curling each page as I read. It didn’t work nearly as well on an iPad though, with no animations and just buttons instead of gesture controls. Maybe this isn’t a glimpse of Google Editions, but it’s something.


The nature of the Internet doesn’t exactly make for an exciting bedtime story, but that’s how Google is presenting “20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web.”

Google’s Chrome team wrote the e-book in HTML5, presented as interactive pages that you can fold and flip by clicking and dragging the mouse. The book is fun to read, at least for a little while, and educational if you’re not a know-it-all. It advocates for updating to a modern Web browser (i.e., not IE6) and argues that plug-ins are relics (unless they’re integrated into the browser itself, as Chrome does with Adobe Flash). Leer más “Google Releases an E-Book About the Internet (But Still No Book Store)”