Creating A Meaningful Marketing Message

Several weeks back we started a book club at Bailey Gardiner. No, we’re not looking to take Oprah’s place after her final season, but as an agency we like to stay on top of what’s going on in the world of marketing, advertising, PR and Social Media. That’s a lot for one person to do and since there are a lot of great reads out there, divide and share is what we are doing!

The Next Evolution of Marketing by Bob Gilbreath was the book I had the pleasure of reading. Bob Gilbreath is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Bridge Worldwide and has a extensive history in marketing on both the agency and client side. His book is broken into two basic sections with the first explaining what meaningful marketing is and the second sharing steps on how to create it. What is meaningful marketing you ask?


Several weeks back we started a book club at Bailey Gardiner.  No, we’re not looking to take Oprah’s place after her final season,  but as an agency we like to stay on top of what’s going on in the world of marketing, advertising, PR and Social Media.  That’s a lot for one person to do and since there are a lot of great reads out there,  divide and share is what we are doing!

The Next Evolution of Marketing by Bob Gilbreath was the book I had the pleasure of reading.  Bob Gilbreath is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Bridge Worldwide and has a extensive history in marketing on both the agency and client side.  His book is broken into two basic sections with the first explaining what meaningful marketing is and the second sharing steps on how to create it. What is meaningful marketing you ask?

There are two traits of marketing with meaning:

1.  It’s marketing that people choose to engage with. It involves creating something that people find is worthy of their time and attention, rather than continuing to look for ways to cleverly (or not so cleverly) interrupt them.

2. It’s marketing that itself improves people’s lives. Many marketers go to bed at night proud to support products and services that add value.  Indeed, they may remove tough stains, put a smile on faces, or enable priceless purchases but we too often utilize the old interruption approach to present these products and services to out customers.  Instead, we must create advertising that actually adds value, without necessarily forcing a sale.

The Hierarchy of Meaningful Marketing:

One of the parts in this book that resonated with me most, and brought me back to my high school days, was the Hierarchy of Meaningful Marketing and the connection Gilbreath bridged to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Solution Marketing: Like the lower levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, solution marketing covers basic household needs and benefits, for example, helpful offers, money savings and hard rewards for purchase.

Connection Marketing:  This represents a significant step toward building a bonding relationship between people and brands.  It matches closely with Maslow’s love/belonging category, providing benefits beyond the basics of information and relevance to include something that is of deeper importance in the consumer’s mind, i.e., social outlets and creative expression.

Achievement Marketing:  This corresponds to Maslow’s pinnacle of self-actualization by allowing people to significantly improve their lives, realize a dream, or positively change their community and their world. Leer más “Creating A Meaningful Marketing Message”

Design Thinking – The Future is unknown? By abaldaia.wordpress.com

Jump into the unknown

As We Know,
There are known knowns.
There are things we know we know.
Also we know
There are known unknowns.
That is to say
We know there are some things
We do not know.
But there are unknown unknowns Also,
The ones we do not know
We do not know.

Donald Rumsfeld

The widespread tendency of people to produce the future based on past data, it is a reality that has caused great disappointment. When we extrapolate from the past to predict the future and given the recent experiences, we cannot think of creating a different and better future.

The hard concept that “you cannot measure it does not matter, because it cannot be managed” disrupts and prevents imagination and the creation of new ideas.

The world is full of unknown things, of hidden needs that exist but that neither we nor the companies consumers or users know or articulate.

But innovation is only possible when we challenge and question the rule that the best way is to try to find the best possible answer to a problem. Finding opportunity becomes more important than solving problems, which leads to responses that did not exist before.

What are the most sensitive points in the day-to-day lives and how to get information about it?

The opportunity to respond to the whole rather than ad hoc answers is given to us by observation of routines that allows the tacit understanding of background conditions.

This observation should be viewed more like an expedition to the lifestyle of people and companies and held a second set of tracks including the emotional world, language or body language, if applicable.

How to articulate needs in enterprises where the requirements have not been thought of?

The notion of context must be present in the observations so as to identify needs and opportunities, not on the past, but based on what are already relatively in the future.


Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/28/design-thinking-the-future-is-unknown/#comment-213

Jump into the unknown

As We Know,
There are known knowns.
There are things we know we know.
Also we know
There are known unknowns.
That is to say
We know there are some things
We do not know.
But there are unknown unknowns Also,
The ones we do not know
We do not know.

Donald Rumsfeld

The widespread tendency of people to produce the future based on past data, it is a reality that has caused great disappointment. When we extrapolate from the past to predict the future and given the recent experiences, we cannot think of creating a different and better future.

The hard concept that “you cannot measure it does not matter, because it cannot be managed” disrupts and prevents imagination and the creation of new ideas.

The world is full of unknown things, of hidden needs that exist but that neither we nor the companies consumers or users know or articulate.

But innovation is only possible when we challenge and question the rule that the best way is to try to find the best possible answer to a problem. Finding opportunity becomes more important than solving problems, which leads to responses that did not exist before.

What are the most sensitive points in the day-to-day lives and how to get information about it?

The opportunity to respond to the whole rather than ad hoc answers is given to us by observation of routines that allows the tacit understanding of background conditions.

This observation should be viewed more like an expedition to the lifestyle of people and companies and held a second set of tracks including the emotional world, language or body language, if applicable.

How to articulate needs in enterprises where the requirements have not been thought of?

The notion of context must be present in the observations so as to identify needs and opportunities, not on the past, but based on what are already relatively in the future. Leer más “Design Thinking – The Future is unknown? By abaldaia.wordpress.com”

What is needed to move from ideas to innovation?

Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/31/2596/

Change management!

Many companies, despite being full of creativity and technology, lack of management skills in order to convert ideas into reality, that is, innovation.

Vijay Govindarajan author of “The other side of innovation” together with Chris Trimble begins his book referring to the image of climbers after arduous months of preparation work to reach their goal – reach the top of the mountain.

But like many businesses, not just in big, they forget to create reserves of energy for the descent steps.

It seems to be a fact that, in companies, often after a long way in building environments for creativity and acquisition of cutting-edge technologies, innovative management lack capable of sustaining the results of that effort.

How can we turn knowledge into creativity and creativity into innovation ?

Creativity is a skill that can be developed and a process that can be managed. It requires practice to develop the right skills and a supportive environment where they can grow.

Design Thinking can help organizations manage the innovation process and overcome some barriers in particular to help people learn to feel comfortable with uncertainty, ambiguity and what seems a paradox.

There are a number of challenges presented to organizations listed by Gary Hamel and which are described in full in February 2009 issue of Harvard Business Review, and some of which I took to find a path leading up ideas to innovation.

“ Eliminate the pathologies of formal hierarchy. There are advantages to natural hierarchies, where power flows up from the bottom and leaders emerge instead of being appointed.“

Creativity must be seen as an authoritative source such as knowledge and especially when this refers to practices that do not support an open world.


Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/31/2596/

Change management!

Many companies, despite being full of creativity and technology, lack of management skills in order to convert ideas into reality, that is, innovation.

Vijay Govindarajan author of “The other side of innovation” together with Chris Trimble begins his book referring to the image of climbers after arduous months of preparation work to reach their goal – reach the top of the mountain.

But like many businesses, not just in big, they forget to create reserves of energy for the descent steps.

It seems to be a fact that, in companies, often after a long way in building environments for creativity and acquisition of cutting-edge technologies, innovative management lack capable of sustaining the results of that effort.

How can we turn knowledge into creativity and creativity into innovation ?

Creativity is a skill that can be developed and a process that can be managed. It requires practice to develop the right skills and a supportive environment where they can grow.

Design Thinking can help organizations manage the innovation process and overcome some barriers in particular to help people learn to feel comfortable with uncertainty, ambiguity and what seems a paradox.

There are a number of challenges presented to organizations listed by Gary Hamel and which are described in full in February 2009 issue of Harvard Business Review, and some of which I took to find a path leading up ideas to innovation.

Eliminate the pathologies of formal hierarchy. There are advantages to natural hierarchies, where power flows up from the bottom and leaders emerge instead of being appointed.

Creativity must be seen as an authoritative source such as knowledge and especially when this refers to practices that do not support an open world. Leer más “What is needed to move from ideas to innovation?”

The “right” time for innovation

So it actually all comes down to this – my prospects and clients need to understand when the “right” time for innovation is. After all, what we usually hear from executives is that “this isn’t the right time” for innovation. Not that they don’t want innovation, or don’t need innovation, or that innovation is too risky or expensive. No, the usual response is that this simply isn’t the “right” time.

So, in the interest of public edification I decided to conduct a thought experiment, out loud. What, I asked myself, are the appropriate conditions so that one can identify the “right time” for innovation.

First I considered the most obvious time. That most obvious time for innovation is when the wind is behind you, the sun on your face and the markets can’t get enough of your products and services. In other words, the ideal time to innovate would seem to be when you are on top of the world. However, a note of caution creeps in. We don’t want to distract from our good run by taking good people and have them explore new ideas – that’s a distraction. We certainly don’t want to kill the golden goose by identifying new products and service that will cannibalize our best products and services, and we ought to “double down” on what’s making us successful right now.

So, even though these conditions would seem ripe for innovation, there are too many other activities consuming the management team to seriously consider innovation when they are on top.


by Jeffrey Phillip
http://innovateonpurpose.blogspot.com/

So it actually all comes down to this – my prospects and clients need to understand when the “right” time for innovation is.  After all, what we usually hear from executives is that “this isn’t the right time” for innovation.  Not that they don’t want innovation, or don’t need innovation, or that innovation is too risky or expensive.  No, the usual response is that this simply isn’t the “right” time.

So, in the interest of public edification I decided to conduct a thought experiment, out loud.  What, I asked myself, are the appropriate conditions so that one can identify the “right time” for innovation.

First I considered the most obvious time.  That most obvious time for innovation is when the wind is behind you, the sun on your face and the markets can’t get enough of your products and services.  In other words, the ideal time to innovate would seem to be when you are on top of the world.  However, a note of caution creeps in.  We don’t want to distract from our good run by taking good people and have them explore new ideas – that’s a distraction.  We certainly don’t want to kill the golden goose by identifying new products and service that will cannibalize our best products and services, and we ought to “double down” on what’s making us successful right now.

So, even though these conditions would seem ripe for innovation, there are too many other activities consuming the management team to seriously consider innovation when they are on top. Leer más “The “right” time for innovation”

The 16 Most Important Business Questions…. Ever!

It’s the 3 W’s that matter most…

If you’re starting out as an entrepreneur or a freelancer or a project manager, the most important choice you’ll make is: what to do? I often talk to my clients about the most important part of your web address isn’t your name itself, it’s the 3 “W”‘s that come before it…

* Who are you?
* What do you do?
* Why does it matter?

[Más…]
In order to answer those 3 (HUGE) questions quickly and concisely, you need to know the answer to these questions. As a business owner or an entrepreneur, I think these are 16 of the most important questions you could ever ask yourself. If you want to be (really) successful, go somewhere quiet with your favourite drink – and don’t come back until you’ve got a good answer for each of them!


by jeremywaite
http://jeremywaite.wordpress.com/2010/10/21/the-16-most-important-business-questions-ever/

It’s the 3 W’s that matter most…

If you’re starting out as an entrepreneur or a freelancer or a project manager, the most important choice you’ll make is: what to do? I often talk to my clients about the most important part of your web address isn’t your name itself, it’s the 3 “W”‘s that come before it…

  • Who are you?
  • What do you do?
  • Why does it matter?

Leer más “The 16 Most Important Business Questions…. Ever!”

“Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation” 10 NO’s Blocking Business Innovation

From experience and ongoing business innovation research, there are fairly common situations blocking business innovation across companies. No company has all of these business innovation roadblocks, but the presence of just a couple of business innovation barriers will scuttle the most modest dreams of implementing a business innovation program to create value for customers.

None of these business innovation NO’s are insurmountable, so it’s important to understand what causes each of them and some steps to navigate around them and get business innovation going.

1. NO Knack for Innovation

There simply isn’t an orientation toward business innovation. It may be a mature industry, a company that’s had success with an intense focus, one that’s grown through M&A, or has been burned on previous formal innovation efforts. Whatever the reason, innovation doesn’t appear to be in the company’s DNA.

What Are Some Things You Can Try?

* Challenge conventional wisdom that says innovation isn’t vital to the company.
* Target introducing small doses of unconventional strategy to begin.
* Introduce ways to look at the business differently.
* Try to borrow and adapt proven ideas from other industries or markets.


From experience and ongoing business innovation research, there are fairly common situations blocking business innovation across companies. No company has all of  these business innovation roadblocks, but the presence of just a couple of business innovation barriers will scuttle the most modest dreams of implementing a business innovation program to create value for customers.

None of these business innovation NO’s are insurmountable, so it’s important to understand what causes each of them and some steps to navigate around them and get business innovation going.

1. NO Knack for Innovation

There simply isn’t an orientation toward business innovation. It may be a mature industry, a company that’s had success with an intense focus, one that’s grown through M&A, or has been burned on previous formal innovation efforts. Whatever the reason, innovation doesn’t appear to be in the company’s DNA.

What Are Some Things You Can Try?

6 Key Innovation Insights

As part of MLC’s search for best practices in radical innovation (contact us if you have thoughts to share!), I attended the PDMA’s 2010 Global Innovation Conference last week.

One of my highlights was definitely playing with the Spotme networking devices that all attendees received. These hand-held gizmos represent the acceptable face of stalking, enabling you to browse a list of attendees and track relevant people as they move around. It then alerts you every time your target comes within a 25ft radius of you so you can catch them and exchange knowledge. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but it just might be the future of networking.

I also saw some great presentations from General Mills, Corning, Coach, Ashland, Mohan Sawhney, Dan Pink and others. Here are a few of my favorite takeaways:


by  Anna Bird
http://mlcwideangle.exbdblogs.com/2010/10/26/6-key-innovation-insights/

As part of MLC’s search for best practices in radical innovation (contact us if you have thoughts to share!), I attended the PDMA’s 2010 Global Innovation Conference last week.

One of my highlights was definitely playing with the Spotme networking devices that all attendees received.  These hand-held gizmos represent the acceptable face of stalking, enabling you to browse a list of attendees and track relevant people as they move around. It then alerts you every time your target comes within a 25ft radius of you so you can catch them and exchange knowledge. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but it just might be the future of networking.

I also saw some great presentations from General Mills, Corning, Coach, Ashland, Mohan Sawhney, Dan Pink and others.  Here are a few of my favorite takeaways: Leer más “6 Key Innovation Insights”