Creating A Meaningful Marketing Message

Several weeks back we started a book club at Bailey Gardiner. No, we’re not looking to take Oprah’s place after her final season, but as an agency we like to stay on top of what’s going on in the world of marketing, advertising, PR and Social Media. That’s a lot for one person to do and since there are a lot of great reads out there, divide and share is what we are doing!

The Next Evolution of Marketing by Bob Gilbreath was the book I had the pleasure of reading. Bob Gilbreath is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Bridge Worldwide and has a extensive history in marketing on both the agency and client side. His book is broken into two basic sections with the first explaining what meaningful marketing is and the second sharing steps on how to create it. What is meaningful marketing you ask?


Several weeks back we started a book club at Bailey Gardiner.  No, we’re not looking to take Oprah’s place after her final season,  but as an agency we like to stay on top of what’s going on in the world of marketing, advertising, PR and Social Media.  That’s a lot for one person to do and since there are a lot of great reads out there,  divide and share is what we are doing!

The Next Evolution of Marketing by Bob Gilbreath was the book I had the pleasure of reading.  Bob Gilbreath is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Bridge Worldwide and has a extensive history in marketing on both the agency and client side.  His book is broken into two basic sections with the first explaining what meaningful marketing is and the second sharing steps on how to create it. What is meaningful marketing you ask?

There are two traits of marketing with meaning:

1.  It’s marketing that people choose to engage with. It involves creating something that people find is worthy of their time and attention, rather than continuing to look for ways to cleverly (or not so cleverly) interrupt them.

2. It’s marketing that itself improves people’s lives. Many marketers go to bed at night proud to support products and services that add value.  Indeed, they may remove tough stains, put a smile on faces, or enable priceless purchases but we too often utilize the old interruption approach to present these products and services to out customers.  Instead, we must create advertising that actually adds value, without necessarily forcing a sale.

The Hierarchy of Meaningful Marketing:

One of the parts in this book that resonated with me most, and brought me back to my high school days, was the Hierarchy of Meaningful Marketing and the connection Gilbreath bridged to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Solution Marketing: Like the lower levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, solution marketing covers basic household needs and benefits, for example, helpful offers, money savings and hard rewards for purchase.

Connection Marketing:  This represents a significant step toward building a bonding relationship between people and brands.  It matches closely with Maslow’s love/belonging category, providing benefits beyond the basics of information and relevance to include something that is of deeper importance in the consumer’s mind, i.e., social outlets and creative expression.

Achievement Marketing:  This corresponds to Maslow’s pinnacle of self-actualization by allowing people to significantly improve their lives, realize a dream, or positively change their community and their world. Leer más “Creating A Meaningful Marketing Message”

Design Thinking – The Future is unknown? By abaldaia.wordpress.com

Jump into the unknown

As We Know,
There are known knowns.
There are things we know we know.
Also we know
There are known unknowns.
That is to say
We know there are some things
We do not know.
But there are unknown unknowns Also,
The ones we do not know
We do not know.

Donald Rumsfeld

The widespread tendency of people to produce the future based on past data, it is a reality that has caused great disappointment. When we extrapolate from the past to predict the future and given the recent experiences, we cannot think of creating a different and better future.

The hard concept that “you cannot measure it does not matter, because it cannot be managed” disrupts and prevents imagination and the creation of new ideas.

The world is full of unknown things, of hidden needs that exist but that neither we nor the companies consumers or users know or articulate.

But innovation is only possible when we challenge and question the rule that the best way is to try to find the best possible answer to a problem. Finding opportunity becomes more important than solving problems, which leads to responses that did not exist before.

What are the most sensitive points in the day-to-day lives and how to get information about it?

The opportunity to respond to the whole rather than ad hoc answers is given to us by observation of routines that allows the tacit understanding of background conditions.

This observation should be viewed more like an expedition to the lifestyle of people and companies and held a second set of tracks including the emotional world, language or body language, if applicable.

How to articulate needs in enterprises where the requirements have not been thought of?

The notion of context must be present in the observations so as to identify needs and opportunities, not on the past, but based on what are already relatively in the future.


Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/28/design-thinking-the-future-is-unknown/#comment-213

Jump into the unknown

As We Know,
There are known knowns.
There are things we know we know.
Also we know
There are known unknowns.
That is to say
We know there are some things
We do not know.
But there are unknown unknowns Also,
The ones we do not know
We do not know.

Donald Rumsfeld

The widespread tendency of people to produce the future based on past data, it is a reality that has caused great disappointment. When we extrapolate from the past to predict the future and given the recent experiences, we cannot think of creating a different and better future.

The hard concept that “you cannot measure it does not matter, because it cannot be managed” disrupts and prevents imagination and the creation of new ideas.

The world is full of unknown things, of hidden needs that exist but that neither we nor the companies consumers or users know or articulate.

But innovation is only possible when we challenge and question the rule that the best way is to try to find the best possible answer to a problem. Finding opportunity becomes more important than solving problems, which leads to responses that did not exist before.

What are the most sensitive points in the day-to-day lives and how to get information about it?

The opportunity to respond to the whole rather than ad hoc answers is given to us by observation of routines that allows the tacit understanding of background conditions.

This observation should be viewed more like an expedition to the lifestyle of people and companies and held a second set of tracks including the emotional world, language or body language, if applicable.

How to articulate needs in enterprises where the requirements have not been thought of?

The notion of context must be present in the observations so as to identify needs and opportunities, not on the past, but based on what are already relatively in the future. Leer más “Design Thinking – The Future is unknown? By abaldaia.wordpress.com”

What is needed to move from ideas to innovation?

Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/31/2596/

Change management!

Many companies, despite being full of creativity and technology, lack of management skills in order to convert ideas into reality, that is, innovation.

Vijay Govindarajan author of “The other side of innovation” together with Chris Trimble begins his book referring to the image of climbers after arduous months of preparation work to reach their goal – reach the top of the mountain.

But like many businesses, not just in big, they forget to create reserves of energy for the descent steps.

It seems to be a fact that, in companies, often after a long way in building environments for creativity and acquisition of cutting-edge technologies, innovative management lack capable of sustaining the results of that effort.

How can we turn knowledge into creativity and creativity into innovation ?

Creativity is a skill that can be developed and a process that can be managed. It requires practice to develop the right skills and a supportive environment where they can grow.

Design Thinking can help organizations manage the innovation process and overcome some barriers in particular to help people learn to feel comfortable with uncertainty, ambiguity and what seems a paradox.

There are a number of challenges presented to organizations listed by Gary Hamel and which are described in full in February 2009 issue of Harvard Business Review, and some of which I took to find a path leading up ideas to innovation.

“ Eliminate the pathologies of formal hierarchy. There are advantages to natural hierarchies, where power flows up from the bottom and leaders emerge instead of being appointed.“

Creativity must be seen as an authoritative source such as knowledge and especially when this refers to practices that do not support an open world.


Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/31/2596/

Change management!

Many companies, despite being full of creativity and technology, lack of management skills in order to convert ideas into reality, that is, innovation.

Vijay Govindarajan author of “The other side of innovation” together with Chris Trimble begins his book referring to the image of climbers after arduous months of preparation work to reach their goal – reach the top of the mountain.

But like many businesses, not just in big, they forget to create reserves of energy for the descent steps.

It seems to be a fact that, in companies, often after a long way in building environments for creativity and acquisition of cutting-edge technologies, innovative management lack capable of sustaining the results of that effort.

How can we turn knowledge into creativity and creativity into innovation ?

Creativity is a skill that can be developed and a process that can be managed. It requires practice to develop the right skills and a supportive environment where they can grow.

Design Thinking can help organizations manage the innovation process and overcome some barriers in particular to help people learn to feel comfortable with uncertainty, ambiguity and what seems a paradox.

There are a number of challenges presented to organizations listed by Gary Hamel and which are described in full in February 2009 issue of Harvard Business Review, and some of which I took to find a path leading up ideas to innovation.

Eliminate the pathologies of formal hierarchy. There are advantages to natural hierarchies, where power flows up from the bottom and leaders emerge instead of being appointed.

Creativity must be seen as an authoritative source such as knowledge and especially when this refers to practices that do not support an open world. Leer más “What is needed to move from ideas to innovation?”

The “right” time for innovation

So it actually all comes down to this – my prospects and clients need to understand when the “right” time for innovation is. After all, what we usually hear from executives is that “this isn’t the right time” for innovation. Not that they don’t want innovation, or don’t need innovation, or that innovation is too risky or expensive. No, the usual response is that this simply isn’t the “right” time.

So, in the interest of public edification I decided to conduct a thought experiment, out loud. What, I asked myself, are the appropriate conditions so that one can identify the “right time” for innovation.

First I considered the most obvious time. That most obvious time for innovation is when the wind is behind you, the sun on your face and the markets can’t get enough of your products and services. In other words, the ideal time to innovate would seem to be when you are on top of the world. However, a note of caution creeps in. We don’t want to distract from our good run by taking good people and have them explore new ideas – that’s a distraction. We certainly don’t want to kill the golden goose by identifying new products and service that will cannibalize our best products and services, and we ought to “double down” on what’s making us successful right now.

So, even though these conditions would seem ripe for innovation, there are too many other activities consuming the management team to seriously consider innovation when they are on top.


by Jeffrey Phillip
http://innovateonpurpose.blogspot.com/

So it actually all comes down to this – my prospects and clients need to understand when the “right” time for innovation is.  After all, what we usually hear from executives is that “this isn’t the right time” for innovation.  Not that they don’t want innovation, or don’t need innovation, or that innovation is too risky or expensive.  No, the usual response is that this simply isn’t the “right” time.

So, in the interest of public edification I decided to conduct a thought experiment, out loud.  What, I asked myself, are the appropriate conditions so that one can identify the “right time” for innovation.

First I considered the most obvious time.  That most obvious time for innovation is when the wind is behind you, the sun on your face and the markets can’t get enough of your products and services.  In other words, the ideal time to innovate would seem to be when you are on top of the world.  However, a note of caution creeps in.  We don’t want to distract from our good run by taking good people and have them explore new ideas – that’s a distraction.  We certainly don’t want to kill the golden goose by identifying new products and service that will cannibalize our best products and services, and we ought to “double down” on what’s making us successful right now.

So, even though these conditions would seem ripe for innovation, there are too many other activities consuming the management team to seriously consider innovation when they are on top. Leer más “The “right” time for innovation”

The 16 Most Important Business Questions…. Ever!

It’s the 3 W’s that matter most…

If you’re starting out as an entrepreneur or a freelancer or a project manager, the most important choice you’ll make is: what to do? I often talk to my clients about the most important part of your web address isn’t your name itself, it’s the 3 “W”‘s that come before it…

* Who are you?
* What do you do?
* Why does it matter?

[Más…]
In order to answer those 3 (HUGE) questions quickly and concisely, you need to know the answer to these questions. As a business owner or an entrepreneur, I think these are 16 of the most important questions you could ever ask yourself. If you want to be (really) successful, go somewhere quiet with your favourite drink – and don’t come back until you’ve got a good answer for each of them!


by jeremywaite
http://jeremywaite.wordpress.com/2010/10/21/the-16-most-important-business-questions-ever/

It’s the 3 W’s that matter most…

If you’re starting out as an entrepreneur or a freelancer or a project manager, the most important choice you’ll make is: what to do? I often talk to my clients about the most important part of your web address isn’t your name itself, it’s the 3 “W”‘s that come before it…

  • Who are you?
  • What do you do?
  • Why does it matter?

Leer más “The 16 Most Important Business Questions…. Ever!”

“Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation” 10 NO’s Blocking Business Innovation

From experience and ongoing business innovation research, there are fairly common situations blocking business innovation across companies. No company has all of these business innovation roadblocks, but the presence of just a couple of business innovation barriers will scuttle the most modest dreams of implementing a business innovation program to create value for customers.

None of these business innovation NO’s are insurmountable, so it’s important to understand what causes each of them and some steps to navigate around them and get business innovation going.

1. NO Knack for Innovation

There simply isn’t an orientation toward business innovation. It may be a mature industry, a company that’s had success with an intense focus, one that’s grown through M&A, or has been burned on previous formal innovation efforts. Whatever the reason, innovation doesn’t appear to be in the company’s DNA.

What Are Some Things You Can Try?

* Challenge conventional wisdom that says innovation isn’t vital to the company.
* Target introducing small doses of unconventional strategy to begin.
* Introduce ways to look at the business differently.
* Try to borrow and adapt proven ideas from other industries or markets.


From experience and ongoing business innovation research, there are fairly common situations blocking business innovation across companies. No company has all of  these business innovation roadblocks, but the presence of just a couple of business innovation barriers will scuttle the most modest dreams of implementing a business innovation program to create value for customers.

None of these business innovation NO’s are insurmountable, so it’s important to understand what causes each of them and some steps to navigate around them and get business innovation going.

1. NO Knack for Innovation

There simply isn’t an orientation toward business innovation. It may be a mature industry, a company that’s had success with an intense focus, one that’s grown through M&A, or has been burned on previous formal innovation efforts. Whatever the reason, innovation doesn’t appear to be in the company’s DNA.

What Are Some Things You Can Try?

6 Key Innovation Insights

As part of MLC’s search for best practices in radical innovation (contact us if you have thoughts to share!), I attended the PDMA’s 2010 Global Innovation Conference last week.

One of my highlights was definitely playing with the Spotme networking devices that all attendees received. These hand-held gizmos represent the acceptable face of stalking, enabling you to browse a list of attendees and track relevant people as they move around. It then alerts you every time your target comes within a 25ft radius of you so you can catch them and exchange knowledge. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but it just might be the future of networking.

I also saw some great presentations from General Mills, Corning, Coach, Ashland, Mohan Sawhney, Dan Pink and others. Here are a few of my favorite takeaways:


by  Anna Bird
http://mlcwideangle.exbdblogs.com/2010/10/26/6-key-innovation-insights/

As part of MLC’s search for best practices in radical innovation (contact us if you have thoughts to share!), I attended the PDMA’s 2010 Global Innovation Conference last week.

One of my highlights was definitely playing with the Spotme networking devices that all attendees received.  These hand-held gizmos represent the acceptable face of stalking, enabling you to browse a list of attendees and track relevant people as they move around. It then alerts you every time your target comes within a 25ft radius of you so you can catch them and exchange knowledge. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but it just might be the future of networking.

I also saw some great presentations from General Mills, Corning, Coach, Ashland, Mohan Sawhney, Dan Pink and others.  Here are a few of my favorite takeaways: Leer más “6 Key Innovation Insights”

Top 10 Ways to Follow The Right People On Twitter

It is a commonly accepted fact that one of the best ways to grow your network on Twitter is to go out and follow new people. Assuming you’re following people with the same interests as you/your company, and that you have an engaging Twitter strategy, you are likely to get a follow back. So, how do you find these perfect people to follow? Below are the top ten ways to find the right people on Twitter.
1. Look through lists

Twitter lists are an awesome way to find people that talk about the same things you do. Start by looking at the lists you are on. Who else is on those lists with you? Clearly one of your followers thinks you have something in common with them. After going through all of your lists, try checking colleagues and other industry leaders’ lists. Any list they are on may be full of relevant people for you as well. You can also try searching for lists by category on Listorious.


follow5

It is a commonly accepted fact that one of the best ways to grow your network on Twitter is to go out and follow new people. Assuming you’re following people with the same interests as you/your company, and that you have an engaging Twitter strategy, you are likely to get a follow back. So, how do you find these perfect people to follow? Below are the top ten ways to find the right people on Twitter.

1. Look through lists

Twitter lists are an awesome way to find people that talk about the same things you do. Start by looking at the lists you are on. Who else is on those lists with you? Clearly one of your followers thinks you have something in common with them. After going through all of your lists, try checking colleagues and other industry leaders’ lists. Any list they are on may be full of relevant people for you as well. You can also try searching for lists by category on Listorious.

2. Mine TweetMeme buttons

(s_mestdagh)

If you publish content and have a TweetMeme button set up, check who is sharing your content. Often times people will share your information without using your handle in it. You already know they think you are interesting (or at least your content is) so you are likely to get a follow back. Take it one step further and give them a “thank you” for sharing the link. That way they make the connection that you are the producer of the content they enjoy. Leer más “Top 10 Ways to Follow The Right People On Twitter”

¿Dónde están mis fans?

Y está muy bien. Es bueno que se formen nuevos especialistas para nuevos entornos. Especialistas en la estrategia, la táctica, la operativa y hasta la gestión. Y es bueno que haya tanto entusiasmo. Y por supuesto creo y recomiendo que las intervenciones en social media (como en cualquier otro entorno) han de hacerse siempre de la mano de profesionales cualificados. Y hay muy buenos profesionales en cualquiera de estás especialidades.

Pero llegado a este punto me pregunto ¿hemos captado bien el mensaje? ¿realmente hemos visto la foto completa?

Si estamos hablando de que la gente recomienda en las redes sociales sus marcas favoritas ¿por qué tantos se centran en la parte de “redes sociales” y tan pocos en la de “marca favorita“? ¿O es que esperan convertirse en marca favorita por estar en Facebook? Ni lo sueñes. Ni siquiera haciendo comentarios ingeniosos en Twitter. Lo siento, no es tan fácil.

No veo un interés similar por contratar profesionales para mejorar la experiencia de marca: ni ingenieros para mejorar los procesos, ni coaches para mejorar las relaciones, ni diseñadores o comunicadores para mejorar las percepciones… las redes sociales no han provocado una estampida de gerentes queriendo mejorar su producto o su propuesta de valor. ¿Por qué?.


Desde hace un tiempo, no mucho realmente (unos pocos años), empezamos a ver, cada vez con más frecuencia, titulares como estos:
“El X% de los usuarios de internet recomienda su marca favorita en las redes sociales”.
“A la hora de comprar, los usuarios de internet aceptan las recomendaciones de sus amigos en las redes sociales”

Corren tiempos difíciles para las empresas y toda oportunidad debe ser atendida. Así que “a por el social media” dicen muchas, y sin acabar de entender muy bien de qué se trata, se lanzan a la batalla por los fans, seguidores, amigos y “recomendadores” de gusto y click fácil.
Y de repente, empiezan a crecer como hongos las páginas y perfiles de empresas en Facebook, las cuentas de marcas de Twitter, los blogs corporativos… Todo el mundo quiere estar en las redes sociales, los profesionales elaboramos maravillosas y convincentes presentaciones sobre por qué y cómo hay que estar en las redes sociales. El mundo se llena de Social Media Strategists, Social Media Evangelists, Social Media expertos y especialistas en todo lo que tenga más de 5 usuarios conectados, y por supuesto, Community Managers. El Community Manager se convierte el perfil de moda: medio mundo quiere ser Community Manager, y el otro medio quiere que su primo, el informático, le haga de Community Manager para su empresa (por supuesto sin tener la más remota idea de qué debería hacer un community manager). Hasta hay concursos para convertirse en Community Manager (como si de una estrella de rock se tratara). Si buscas hoy “Communty Manager” en Google, te devuelve aproximadamente ¡291 millones de resultados!. No está mal ¿no?.

Dejad que lo ponga en contexto…: Leer más “¿Dónde están mis fans?”

Do Short Posts Deliver on Value?

So each time I write blog posts, I’m mindful of my tendency to write long. Sometimes my first drafts extend well over 1,500 words. Then I trim and edit and cut and snip until they’re back down to something manageable.

Truth be told, that isn’t always fun.

In fact, some people have asked that I shorten posts down. That I deliver fast bites with impact, that I publish quick messages they can grasp in an instant. They want to hear what I have to say… they just don’t have the time to read it all.

This isn’t new. Other thought leaders write short. Chris Brogan publishes posts that are just a few paragraphs. Not always, but sometimes. Seth Godin has mastered the short post and his audience loves him for it. Julien’s posts get straight to the point.

And it works. [Más…]

I’ve always thought that short posts were the cheap way out, honestly, which is why I suppose I developed the habit of writing long. I thought short posts were a cop-out. That somehow, they didn’t deliver value. That they lacked in substance or that the author couldn’t be bothered to write and just tossed it off.

But I’m beginning to think a little differently about short posts.

It would feel relieving to slam out a fast, impactful, thought-provoking message as it struck me than have to reserve hours out of my week to craft and hone those long posts into reader-worthy length. It would be better, too, because I have a lot to say, and I could say more of it if writing wasn’t such a time-consuming chore.

Don’t get me wrong. I like writing. And I like writing long.

But I’m no longer sure it’s necessary – at least, not for every post.

Would you prefer to read something that’s really good that doesn’t take forever to read? I know I do when I visit other blogs – we’re all busy, after all.


I write long.

It’s a bit of a fault of mine, actually. I feel that long posts are just … better, somehow. Fuller. Richer. More valuable. I feel that long posts give you all the goods, everything you need, all in one place.

Long posts are hard work, though. Delivering that much value and information in a single post without losing a reader’s attention is tough. And if a reader decides it’s too much work to get to the end…

Well. That’s no good, is it? Then nothing gets read. All that hard work goes to waste.

So each time I write blog posts, I’m mindful of my tendency to write long. Sometimes my first drafts extend well over 1,500 words. Then I trim and edit and cut and snip until they’re back down to something manageable.

Truth be told, that isn’t always fun.

In fact, some people have asked that I shorten posts down. That I deliver fast bites with impact, that I publish quick messages they can grasp in an instant. They want to hear what I have to say… they just don’t have the time to read it all.

This isn’t new. Other thought leaders write short. Chris Brogan publishes posts that are just a few paragraphs. Not always, but sometimes. Seth Godin has mastered the short post and his audience loves him for it. Julien’s posts get straight to the point.

And it works. Leer más “Do Short Posts Deliver on Value?”

4 factores claves para atraer clientes con el marketing digital

James Gurd, consultor de ecommerce y marketing, ha revelado en Catalogue e-business las claves básicas del marketing digital para todos los propietarios de páginas web que quieren desarrollar el ecommerce y el marketing digital. El mayor reto, según afirma Gurd, es saber cómo y dónde empezar, y para ello hay que tener en cuenta los cuatro factores esenciales en el marketing digital: estar preparado, ser visto, ser encontrado y gustar.


http://www.marketingdirecto.com

James Gurd, consultor de ecommerce y marketing, ha revelado en Catalogue e-business las claves básicas del marketing digital para todos los propietarios de páginas web que quieren desarrollar el ecommerce y el marketing digital. El mayor reto, según afirma Gurd, es saber cómo y dónde empezar, y para ello hay que tener en cuenta los cuatro factores esenciales en el marketing digital: estar preparado, ser visto, ser encontrado y gustar.

1. Estar preparado.
• Búsqueda de palabras clave
o Utilizando herramientas gratuitas como Google Traffic Estimator realiza búsquedas para todas las combinaciones de palabras clave que sean relevantes para tu marca, tus productos y tus servicios. Así se podrán estimar también cuánto costarán las palabras clave de pago además de saber qué verán los usuarios cuando busquen tus palabras claves.
o Evalúa los volúmenes de búsqueda globales y locales y las tendencias de estos volúmenes.

• Examina la actividad de la competencia
o Haz una lista de los tres principales competidores online o multicanal y observa lo que hacen.
o Realiza búsquedas de palabras claves que sean importantes para ti y con las que no consigues situarte en la primera página de resultados en los motores de búsqueda.
o Evalúa el esitlo de tus rivales a la hora de escribir títulos y descripciones.
o Entra en sus páginas, mira sus contenidos y valora la efectividad de sus llamadas a la acción.
o Anota lo que te gusta y lo que podrían hacer tú mejor.

• Define una lista de palabras clave
o De las búsquedas, mira las combinaciones de palabras claves que tienen un potencial de tráfico significativo y para las que tienes páginas relevantes que satisfarán las búsquedas de tus clientes.
o La lista es la base de tu trabajo de optimización y ayudará a focalizar tus esfuerzos.

• Desarrolla una estrategia de contenidos
o Agrupa las combinaciones de palabras clave en grupos de objetivos lógicos como marca, productos y consejos.
o Dentro de cada grupo, establece las páginas de tu website que tienen que ser optimizadas.
o Define una lista de contenidos adicionales que puedas producir para ayudar a los clientes y a los motores de búsqueda, como nuevas páginas o contenidos extra.
o Define cómo interactuará cada una de las páginas de tu site con las demás páginas asociadas.
o Define la jerarquía de prioridad de las distintas áreas. Leer más “4 factores claves para atraer clientes con el marketing digital”

2010 Top 49 Most Influential Men

More than half a million AskMen readers voted, along with the staff of AskMen, to determine the Top 49 Most Influential Men of 2010. The men who made the list come from all backgrounds- – politics, sports, entertainment, technology, philanthropy — but every single man on the list is a groundbreaker in his respective field, and some are even outright rule-breakers. These are the men history will remember as having defined 2010. More importantly, they’re the men who inspire the rest of us to become Better Men.

So who tops the list in 2010? Mark Zuckerberg was No. 4 in 2009, but did the growth of his Facebook empire move him up on the list, or did The Social Network damage his public persona? Tiger Woods was No. 30 last year, but did his troubled public image thwart his influence? President Obama grabbed the No. 1 spot in 2008, and fell to No. 3 in 2009, but has he done enough in 2010 to even make the list?


http://www.askmen.com/specials/top_49_men/

More than half a million AskMen readers voted, along with the staff of AskMen, to determine the Top 49 Most Influential Men of 2010. The men who made the list come from all backgrounds- – politics, sports, entertainment, technology, philanthropy — but every single man on the list is a groundbreaker in his respective field, and some are even outright rule-breakers. These are the men history will remember as having defined 2010. More importantly, they’re the men who inspire the rest of us to become Better Men.

So who tops the list in 2010? Mark Zuckerberg was No. 4 in 2009, but did the growth of his Facebook empire move him up on the list, or did The Social Network damage his public persona? Tiger Woods was No. 30 last year, but did his troubled public image thwart his influence? President Obama grabbed the No. 1 spot in 2008, and fell to No. 3 in 2009, but has he done enough in 2010 to even make the list? Leer más “2010 Top 49 Most Influential Men”

Get Hired Using Videos, Blogs and other Social Media

With 9.2% nationwide unemployment and an increasing number of qualified people looking for jobs, applicants are becoming more creative in the job search. For example, the paper resume has taken a back seat to the “digital interview” as YouTube is becoming an emerging platform for job seekers to showcase their expertise, skills and talents to prospective employers.

Using YouTube as a platform for job applications is more personalized and can be more effective than a resume when done correctly. Video is a great way to “brand yourself,” reach a broader audience and highlight special talents that may not stand out on a traditional resume. Additionally, video is a great way to show your personality and demonstrate who you are beyond words on paper.

Blogs are another useful way to pop up on the radar of a hiring manager or corporate executive. Use blogs to strategically place yourself directly in front of targeted companies, by using search optimization and strategic content creation. However, make sure that you create relevant content and attract attention in a positive way. SlideShare is also another great way to communicate your knowledge and creativity in your field of expertise.

Some Tips:


With 9.2% nationwide unemployment and an increasing number of qualified people looking for jobs, applicants are becoming more creative in the job search.  For example, the paper resume has taken a back seat to the “digital interview” as YouTube is becoming an emerging platform for job seekers to showcase their expertise, skills and talents to prospective employers.

Using YouTube as a platform for job applications is more personalized and can be more effective than a resume when done correctly.  Video is a great way to “brand yourself,” reach a broader audience and highlight special talents that may not stand out on a traditional resume.   Additionally, video is a great way to show your personality and demonstrate who you are beyond words on paper.

Blogs are another useful way to pop up on the radar of a hiring manager or corporate executive.  Use blogs to strategically place yourself directly in front of targeted companies, by using search optimization and strategic content creation.  However, make sure that you create relevant content and attract attention in a positive way.  SlideShare is also another great way to communicate your knowledge and creativity in your field of expertise.

Some Tips: Leer más “Get Hired Using Videos, Blogs and other Social Media”

How Incentives Can Undermine Your Influence

I’ve studied the influence strategies of many leaders in the past 25 years but few more remarkable than Danny Meyer’s.

Danny is, in my estimation, the most influential restaurateur in New York City. In 1985, he started the Union Square Café with a disarmingly delicious American menu. And in spite of the fierce competition for Manhattan diners, he succeeded phenomenally in both culinary and financial terms. For his next feat, he opened Gramercy Tavern, where he struck gold again. In the past 11 years, Gramercy Tavern and Union Square Café have ranked among Zagat’s top 10 most popular restaurants in New York City. In 2004, after following with French, Indian, and Italian restaurants, Danny opened the renowned Shake Shack in Madison Park. Since then, six locations have followed. Today every one of his 10 restaurant brands have appeared every year in Zagat’s top 40 for New York City. I wanted to find out why.

When I asked Danny to explain his sustained success, he told me a story. The week before, a guest at Tabla, his Indian restaurant, was settling his bill and asked his server if he could recommend a place to find a great cigar. The server said, “I’m sorry, I can’t. But I know someone who can.” He hustled across the restaurant and motioned to one of the other servers, who had just returned from Puerto Rico with a personal stash of exotic cigars. Moments later that server not only presented the guest with one of his prizes but also took time to rhapsodize about its provenance and specifications in loving detail.

After relating this incident, Danny went on to explain that his goal is to influence his 1,500 employees to achieve that same level of customer service daily. “We serve 100,000 meals every day,” Danny told me. “What would happen to our growth opportunity if we could just make 5 percent of those experiences supremely and intimately special? Serving great food is what’s expected of us. Our opportunity to become people’s favorite restaurant lies in going beyond meal service to creating an experience of true hospitality.”


Too many leaders think money is the easiest—and best way—to get results. Take a lesson from restaurateur

By Joseph Grenny
http://www.businessweek.com/managing/content/oct2010/ca20101027_825910.htm

I’ve studied the influence strategies of many leaders in the past 25 years but few more remarkable than Danny Meyer’s.

Danny is, in my estimation, the most influential restaurateur in New York City. In 1985, he started the Union Square Café with a disarmingly delicious American menu. And in spite of the fierce competition for Manhattan diners, he succeeded phenomenally in both culinary and financial terms. For his next feat, he opened Gramercy Tavern, where he struck gold again. In the past 11 years, Gramercy Tavern and Union Square Café have ranked among Zagat’s top 10 most popular restaurants in New York City. In 2004, after following with French, Indian, and Italian restaurants, Danny opened the renowned Shake Shack in Madison Park. Since then, six locations have followed. Today every one of his 10 restaurant brands have appeared every year in Zagat’s top 40 for New York City. I wanted to find out why.

When I asked Danny to explain his sustained success, he told me a story. The week before, a guest at Tabla, his Indian restaurant, was settling his bill and asked his server if he could recommend a place to find a great cigar. The server said, “I’m sorry, I can’t. But I know someone who can.” He hustled across the restaurant and motioned to one of the other servers, who had just returned from Puerto Rico with a personal stash of exotic cigars. Moments later that server not only presented the guest with one of his prizes but also took time to rhapsodize about its provenance and specifications in loving detail.

After relating this incident, Danny went on to explain that his goal is to influence his 1,500 employees to achieve that same level of customer service daily. “We serve 100,000 meals every day,” Danny told me. “What would happen to our growth opportunity if we could just make 5 percent of those experiences supremely and intimately special? Serving great food is what’s expected of us. Our opportunity to become people’s favorite restaurant lies in going beyond meal service to creating an experience of true hospitality.” Leer más “How Incentives Can Undermine Your Influence”

55% of Americans Think Traditional Media Will Disappear in 10 Years

There has been vocal debate as to whether traditional media is threatened by internet-based communications, or whether it can adapt to social media and flourish in a digital world. A new poll from 24/7 Wall St. and Harris Interactive has its finger on the pulse of what the average American really thinks about the future of traditional media, and it appears rather bleak: 55% of those surveyed think that traditional media as we know it will no longer exist within ten years.

The survey asked 2,095 American adults about where they get their media between October 8th and 12th, 2010.

There is some discrepancy between where Americans say they want to get their news and where they actually do get it: 67% responded that they prefer reading news in the newspaper or watching it on TV, but 50% of the respondents indicate that they get nearly all of their news online.


There has been vocal debate as to whether traditional media is threatened by internet-based communications, or whether it can adapt to social media and flourish in a digital world. A new poll from 24/7 Wall St. and Harris Interactive has its finger on the pulse of what the average American really thinks about the future of traditional media, and it appears rather bleak: 55% of those surveyed think that traditional media as we know it will no longer exist within ten years.

The survey asked 2,095 American adults about where they get their media between October 8th and 12th, 2010.

There is some discrepancy between where Americans say they want to get their news and where they actually do get it: 67% responded that they prefer reading news in the newspaper or watching it on TV, but 50% of the respondents indicate that they get nearly all of their news online. Leer más “55% of Americans Think Traditional Media Will Disappear in 10 Years”