David Schlesinger las reglas del periodismo en un cambio constante

Habla David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de la legendaria agencia de noticias Reuters;

Cambiando el periodismo, cambiando a Reuters.
David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de Reuters News

Estas son las reglas del periodismo hoy

1. Conocer la historia que cuentas no es suficiente.

2. Contar la noticia es sólo el principio.

3. La conversación sobre la historia es tan importante como la noticia misma.

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Habla David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de la legendaria agencia de noticias Reuters

Cambiando el periodismo, cambiando a Reuters.
David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de Reuters News

Estas son las reglas del periodismo hoy

1. Conocer la historia que cuentas no es suficiente.

2. Contar la noticia es sólo el principio.

3. La conversación sobre la historia es tan importante como la noticia misma. Leer más “David Schlesinger las reglas del periodismo en un cambio constante”

Leaders’ social values drive staff loyalty, study finds

“They listen to what they say, they look at the decisions they make, sometimes it’s very subtle,” she told CNN.
If you’re lucky enough to go through the ranks and selection, you’ve already proven that you are able to do the job. The question is, how do you define the job.
–Anne S. Tsui, W. P. Carey School of Business Management Professor

“If you’re lucky enough to go through the ranks and selection and (become a CEO), you’ve already proven that you are, in most cases, able to do the job. The question is, how do you define the job,” she said.

“Researchers and companies that do executive training know that executives who are very charismatic have a strong vision about the company and they talk a very good language of rallying the whole company towards this mission, which is ‘let’s do it all for the company,’ and ‘it’s good to do things for our society.'”


Warren Buffett is known for his interest in social values.
Warren Buffett is known for his interest in social values.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Chinese study finds employees are happier, and more likely to stay at a company, if their leaders clearly indicate social values
  • Employee loyalty related to whether a leader’s personal social values matched his or her outward statements
  • But middle management pick up quickly if there’s dissonance between what a CEO says and does
  • And “it’s a given” that business leaders should “know how to make money”

(CNN) — New research shows that managers can benefit from bringing values into the workplace, as long as they do it right.

A study of CEOs and their middle management in China found that employees were happier, and more likely to stay at a company, if their leaders clearly indicated social values — but also followed through in their private actions.

The study of CEOs and their underlings’ happiness was carried out by W. P. Carey School of Business Management Professor Anne S. Tsui, Ping Ping Fu of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Jun Liu of Renmin University of China, and Lan Li of Chinese Entrepreneur Survey System.

Over the course of five years, Tsui and her collaborators studied CEOs and their subordinates at 42 companies in China. They asked both groups about the CEOs’ perceived values, and measured middle managers’ commitment to the company or likelihood of jumping ship.

They found that employee loyalty related to whether a leader’s personal social values matched his or her outward statements.

Tsui said that because corporate leaders communicate their values through every-day actions, typically middle managers can’t help but pick up on their bosses’ values. Leer más “Leaders’ social values drive staff loyalty, study finds”

Jeep: por fin un anuncio de coches diferente


http://www.javierregueira.com/reflexiones-irreverentes-sobre-marcas-y-consumidores/2010/10/jeep-por-fin-un-anuncio-de-coches-diferente.html

Por más que lo he buscado, los señores de Jeep no han tenido la vista de facilitar la viralización de su nueva historia e.d. no hay ni rastro del spot ni puedes bajártelo de su web, así que para verlo no te quedará otra que visitarla:

Jeep

Me parece un buen ejemplo de cómo añadir relevancia en un mercado gris donde casi todas las marcas utilizan los mismos mensajes cansinos.

¿Un ejemplo de mensajes cansinos? Mirad lo que esta misma marca hacía hace dos años…:

Leer más "Jeep: por fin un anuncio de coches diferente"

6 pasos para transformar a un CEO tradicional en un CEO “social”

El 64% de los consejeros delegados de las principales compañías del mundo no tiene presencia en las redes sociales. Es uno de los principales datos que revelaba el estudio “Socialising Your CEO: From (Un)Social to Social” de Weber Shandwick. Es decir, los CEO’s de las 50 compañías líderes del mundo no son “sociales”, no utilizan el entorno digital y los medios sociales para contactar y conversar. Pero ¿qué es un CEO “social”?:

– Dirigen compañías con una elevada reputación. Los CEOs más admirados de nuestro estudio tenían perfiles con una visibilidad online mayor que aquellos CEOs menos admirados (41% frente a un 28% respectivamente).

– Actúan en distintas plataformas. El 72% de los “CEOs sociales” emplea más de un canal cuando interactúa de forma online. Un “CEOs social” utiliza de media 1,8 canales.

– Suelen proceder de compañías americanas. Los CEOs de las compañías con sede en Estados Unidos tienen mayor tendencia a interactuar online que aquellas situadas en EMEA (60% frente al 12% respectivamente). A pesar de que la dimensión de los CEOs de Asia Pacífico y Latinoamérica es demasiado pequeña como para permitir una comparación fiable, hay indicios de que estos también se encuentran en niveles bajos.

– Tienen una extensa trayectoria. Los CEOs que llevan poco tiempo en su cargo (hasta 3 años) tienen una menor tendencia a involucrarse de forma online con respecto a aquellos CEOs que llevan un tiempo moderado (entre 3 y 5 años) o los que llevan un periodo de tiempo más extenso (más de 5 años), representando el 30% frente al 38% y al 43% respectivamente.


http://www.marketingdirecto.com/actualidad/social-media-marketing/6-pasos-para-transformar-a-un-ceo-tradicional-en-un-ceo-social/

El 64% de los consejeros delegados de las principales compañías del mundo no tiene presencia en las redes sociales. Es uno de los principales datos que revelaba el estudio “Socialising Your CEO: From (Un)Social to Social” de Weber Shandwick. Es decir, los CEO’s de las 50 compañías líderes del mundo no son “sociales”, no utilizan el entorno digital y los medios sociales para contactar y conversar. Pero ¿qué es un CEO “social”?:

– Dirigen compañías con una elevada reputación. Los CEOs más admirados de nuestro estudio tenían perfiles con una visibilidad online mayor que aquellos CEOs menos admirados (41% frente a un 28% respectivamente).

– Actúan en distintas plataformas. El 72% de los “CEOs sociales” emplea más de un canal cuando interactúa de forma online. Un “CEOs social” utiliza de media 1,8 canales.

– Suelen proceder de compañías americanas. Los CEOs de las compañías con sede en Estados Unidos tienen mayor tendencia a interactuar online que aquellas situadas en EMEA (60% frente al 12% respectivamente). A pesar de que la dimensión de los CEOs de Asia Pacífico y Latinoamérica es demasiado pequeña como para permitir una comparación fiable, hay indicios de que estos también se encuentran en niveles bajos.

Tienen una extensa trayectoria. Los CEOs que llevan poco tiempo en su cargo (hasta 3 años) tienen una menor tendencia a involucrarse de forma online con respecto a aquellos CEOs que llevan un tiempo moderado (entre 3 y 5 años) o los que llevan un periodo de tiempo más extenso (más de 5 años), representando el 30% frente al 38% y al 43% respectivamente. Leer más “6 pasos para transformar a un CEO tradicional en un CEO “social””

Five Ways to Write Magnificent Copy

Most writing could be better.

Not just a little better — significantly better.

If you start out with a solid topic, a good knowledge of your audience, and a reasonable degree of writing ability, you’ll usually end up with a pretty good piece of writing.

But you don’t have to settle for “pretty good.” A little attention to the final details can kick “pretty good” to “magnificent.”

Whether you’re creating blog posts, special reports, sales letters, a video script, email autoresponders, or whatever else, you can take your writing up a level just by applying some simple principles…: [Más…]
1. Write drunk; edit sober

Now you don’t have to take this literally. I don’t really mean you should be downing rum as your fingers meander with increasing sluggishness and inaccuracy over your keyboard.

I’m looking at the principle behind this gem from Papa Hemingway. The principle which is absolutely vital to producing compelling copy that gets people reading and buying: you must sound real.

Persuasion is mostly a matter of education and building trust, and it’s hard to build trust when you write like a corporate drone.

Too many copywriters slip into an overly formal style because they think it makes them sound important. Bad idea. No one wants to read stiff, formal copy with all the personality of a fax machine.

Better to put too much personality in and have to edit it out later than not put enough in to begin with.

When you write, make sure you have some passion for your topic — and then just tell your reader what you want to say. Don’t self-consciously write. Just tell.

Enthusiasm creates reader involvement. Most writing has too little enthusiasm, not too much. But if you really feel you went off the deep end, you can always tone it down in the edit.

It’s hard to insert life into copy that never had any to begin with.
2. Sleep on it

If this isn’t the most important technique for improving copy, then it’s definitely in the top two after “learn to read and write.”

Simply put: You can improve any piece of writing by letting it sit overnight.

Look, I know you’re in a hurry. I know you’re really excited about what you just wrote. So am I.

I know you’re like a kid at Christmas and you just have to send it off right now to receive the praise and glory you absolutely deserve.

But don’t.

In the cold light of a new day, all writing seems slightly less marvelous and slightly more open to improvement.

With the perspective that a night away from writing will give you, you’ll see that what you thought was a flawless masterpiece could actually do with a tweak here and a sharp cut there. The changes you make at this stage are 80% of what you need to turn good copy into magnificent copy.


image of hands on keyboard

Most writing could be better.

Not just a little better — significantly better.

If you start out with a solid topic, a good knowledge of your audience, and a reasonable degree of writing ability, you’ll usually end up with a pretty good piece of writing.

But you don’t have to settle for “pretty good.” A little attention to the final details can kick “pretty good” to “magnificent.”

Whether you’re creating blog posts, special reports, sales letters, a video script, email autoresponders, or whatever else, you can take your writing up a level just by applying some simple principles…: Leer más “Five Ways to Write Magnificent Copy”

The B.E.S.T. Method for Content Strategy (what you do before Content Marketing)

Behavioral

* What action do we want our customers to take?
* What effect must we achieve with them?
* How will we measure their behavior?
* How will we put them on the path to purchase (what exactly is the conversion)?

To sum up: How will you measure as a whole and what are the smaller measurements that tell the Return on Objective (ROO) story?
Essential

* What do our buyers really need to know (not about our products, but about information and tasks relevant to what we have to offer)?
* How does what they need to know align with the our unique expertise?
* What will provide the most benefit personally or professionally?

To sum up: What’s the intersection between your expertise (as it relates to your products) and the informational/entertainment needs of your customers? That’s what I like the call the secret sauce!
Strategic

* Does this content marketing effort help us achieve our strategic goals?
* Does it integrate with our other strategic initiatives?
* Do we have executive support for this content strategy?

To sum up: I’ve seen too many custom content projects live outside of marketing and the overall strategic goals of the company. To truly be successful, a content strategy needs to tell your brand story as it relates to your customers. Don’t let it live in a vacuum.
Targeted

* Have we precisely identified the prospects we want to target?
* What are the different customer segments? Why are they different?
* Do we really understand what motivates them?
* Do we understand their professional roles?
* Do we understand how they view the product or service we offer?

To sum up: Get a handle on the buyer persona for each of your customer segments. If you don’t know them well, how do you know what they need. (Excellent overview here on a buyer persona.)

How do you get this kind of information? Use these social media tools to create your own listening posts. Send out surveys. Call your customers. Talk to your salespeople.
And finally…

Once you have this information, and the executive team buys into this essential background information for your content strategy, then you can start developing the execution plan.


Core point: Don’t start executing on your content marketing until you have a sound content strategy.

Yes, easier said than done, but so many of us get infatuated with a tactic before really planning out what should happen and why. You wouldn’t build a car without a step-by-step plan, but many of us create an eBook, Facebook page, web content or custom magazine without a content strategy.

To address this, Newt Barrett and I covered the B.E.S.T. content strategy in Get Content Get Customers. The goal of asking the B.E.S.T. questions as part of your content marketing strategy is to find the intersection between your products/services and the information needs of your customers. Only then can you craft a content marketing approach that will deliver more sales, more customers, and more measurable results.

BEST formula

Leer más “The B.E.S.T. Method for Content Strategy (what you do before Content Marketing)”

Review: Processing for Visual Artists

My first thought upon receiving a review copy of “Processing for Visual Artists” by Andrew Glassner was “hey, yet another Processing book?” Glassner is well aware of the ubiquity of Processing literature, however, and targets a specific gap, following his philosophy “that artists and designers are not interested in programming for its own sake, but only as a means to an end: creating expressive work”. This book is made for people who have never written a program before or don’t feel very comfortable in the world of code. Glassner invites the reader to peek over his shoulder to learn about his programming process using a friendly and informal style, which is motivating and makes the book easy and fun to read. And if you like to cook or play the piano (I do!), you’ll feel right at home with Glassner’s many real-world analogies.

The beginning of the book is basically a casual conversation between the author and the reader – master and apprentice –, showing the reader around, introducing computer science terminology, and most of all, taking away the fear of the seemingly steep learning curve. Glassner shows a lot of empathy towards someone new to programming, acknowledging that it will look overwhelmingly complex at first and be hard work, but that, just like learning to ride a bike or playing chords on a piano, the complexity will soon fade away, allowing even a novice programmer to create exciting work. He has three pieces of advice: there is no way you can break your computer with your program, type every code listing by hand (so it’ll sink in), and don’t be afraid of errors. In fact, Glassner left the errors he made when creating the example code right there in the book, so that, as the reader follows him along, he will see where and why an error was made and how it was fixed.


http://datavisualization.ch/opinions/review-processing-for-visual-artists
Review: Processing for Visual Artists The book’s author, Dr. Andrew Glassner,
is a writer-director, and a consultant in story structure, interactive fiction, and computer graphics. He started working in 3D computer graphics in 1978, and has carried out research at many respected labs.


My first thought upon receiving a review copy of “Processing for Visual Artists” by Andrew Glassner was “hey, yet another Processing book?” Glassner is well aware of the ubiquity of Processing literature, however, and targets a specific gap, following his philosophy “that artists and designers are not interested in programming for its own sake, but only as a means to an end: creating expressive work”. This book is made for people who have never written a program before or don’t feel very comfortable in the world of code. Glassner invites the reader to peek over his shoulder to learn about his programming process using a friendly and informal style, which is motivating and makes the book easy and fun to read. And if you like to cook or play the piano (I do!), you’ll feel right at home with Glassner’s many real-world analogies.

The beginning of the book is basically a casual conversation between the author and the reader – master and apprentice –, showing the reader around, introducing computer science terminology, and most of all, taking away the fear of the seemingly steep learning curve. Glassner shows a lot of empathy towards someone new to programming, acknowledging that it will look overwhelmingly complex at first and be hard work, but that, just like learning to ride a bike or playing chords on a piano, the complexity will soon fade away, allowing even a novice programmer to create exciting work. He has three pieces of advice: there is no way you can break your computer with your program, type every code listing by hand (so it’ll sink in), and don’t be afraid of errors. In fact, Glassner left the errors he made when creating the example code right there in the book, so that, as the reader follows him along, he will see where and why an error was made and how it was fixed. Leer más “Review: Processing for Visual Artists”