Should bloggers have control over ads that appear next to their content?

Given the collective bargaining power needed to amass ad dollars, many popular independent bloggers have handed over their sidebars and headers to large blog networks, trusting them to seek out advertisers in return for a percentage of revenue. The larger networks can sometimes contain hundreds of bloggers and sell access to their blogs as packaged deals, meaning a single ad will be displayed across dozens of blogs within a network.

In most cases, this is ideal for the blogger because he can focus on creating content without having to waste time chasing down advertisers.

But occasionally this can lead to an ad placement with which the blogger doesn’t agree, and this is when controversy erupts.

Take, for instance, the Scienceblogs network, which faced a revolt from over a dozen of its own bloggers a few weeks ago when it decided to launch a corporate blog sponsored by Pepsi.

The blog — since taken down — resembled all the other blogs on the network and was aggregated alongside them in its main news feed. Perhaps most outrageously, the corporate-penned posts were being indexed in Google News, which has a high bar of entry for what news sources it allows.

Anuncios

Via TheNextWeb.com: Should bloggers have control over ads that appear next to their content?
Excerpt, then a comment:.

Given the collective bargaining power needed to amass ad dollars, many popular independent bloggers have handed over their sidebars and headers to large blog networks, trusting them to seek out advertisers in return for a percentage of revenue. The larger networks can sometimes contain hundreds of bloggers and sell access to their blogs as packaged deals, meaning a single ad will be displayed across dozens of blogs within a network.

In most cases, this is ideal for the blogger because he can focus on creating content without having to waste time chasing down advertisers.

But occasionally this can lead to an ad placement with which the blogger doesn’t agree, and this is when controversy erupts.

Take, for instance, the Scienceblogs network, which faced a revolt from over a dozen of its own bloggers a few weeks ago when it decided to launch a corporate blog sponsored by Pepsi.

The blog — since taken down — resembled all the other blogs on the network and was aggregated alongside them in its main news feed. Perhaps most outrageously, the corporate-penned posts were being indexed in Google News, which has a high bar of entry for what news sources it allows. Leer más “Should bloggers have control over ads that appear next to their content?”

Best Practices To Design a Perfect HTML Navigation Bar

The navigation bar is an inevitable element in every website. In this post I want to share with you some simple practices and suggestions aimed at designing a perfect HTML navigation bar.

The HTML code is really simple, nothing more than

layer with an unordered list inside. As you probably know, the HTML5 specification introduced a new element that identifies the navigation bar which is the


By Antonio Lupetti (1)
Facebook Profile: http://facebook.com/antoniolupetti
Twitter: http://twitter.com/woork

http://woorkup.com/2010/08/09/best-practices-to-design-a-perfect-html-navigation-bar/

The navigation bar is an inevitable element in every website. In this post I want to share with you some simple practices and suggestions aimed at designing a perfect HTML navigation bar.

Let’s start illustrating the typical HTML structure. Here is a schematization of a typical navigation bar that contains some links:

The HTML code is really simple, nothing more than <div> layer with an unordered list inside. As you probably know, the HTML5 specification introduced a new element that identifies the navigation bar which is the <nav> tag. The <nav> tag substitutes the more general <div> tag but, as you can see in the following code, it doesn’t change the conceptual structure of the navigation bar. Leer más “Best Practices To Design a Perfect HTML Navigation Bar”

100 Fun & Useful Search Engines for Writers [Vintage ’08]

Both students and professional writers use the web for research, marketing and more. Our list of 100 different search tools can help you manage your business, become a better biz tech or web writer, find primary sources, look up translations, and find the more authoritative information out there with minimal effort. Bookmark your favorites to take full advantage of everything they have to offer.

Meta Search Engines

Meta search engines are especially useful because they bring maximum results to you efficiently and accurately.

1. Draze: Draze compares searches from Google, Yahoo and MSN all at once.
2. Dogpile: This multi-search engine features a toolbar, SearchSpy tool and more.
3. ChunkIt!: This sophisticated tool finds hidden content and is great for serious researchers.
4. Mamma: Let Mamma help your search. You can search for the web, videos, shopping pages, jobs, the Yellow Pages and more.
5. WebCrawler: This tool features a toolbar as well as the ability to search Google, Live Search, Yahoo! and Ask all at once.
6. Clusty: This meta search engine groups similar results together for easier browsing.
7. MsFreckles: Super organized writers can use MsFreckles to streamline their search and pull up all kinds of results, including definitions, text translations and more.
8. Trexy: Even absentminded writers can manage their research with Trexxy, a search tool that saves your memory without having to bookmark.
9. ixquick: This tool is very popular in Europe and keeps your personal information private.
10. Jux2: Find the most relevant information from Google and Yahoo! when you use this tool.

Favorites

These old and new favorites are worth using for general searches.

1. Google: Still one of the most popular tools, Google is fast and easy to use. Newest versions allow you to set up your own personal page, too.
2. Alexa: Use the general search tool while comparing site traffic and checking up on your competitors.
3. Live Search: MSN’s search has gotten quite a makeover. Live Search is a sleek design that can pull up web results, images, video, maps and more.
4. Yahoo!: Yahoo!’s shortcuts and individual channels make it easier to pinpoint what you’re looking for.
5. Wikia: For a simple, clean search that depends on community recommendations and input, Wikia is a good choice.

Business Writers…


Eunice Kanenstenhawi Williams
LearningXL

http://www.unixl.com/blog/2008/100-fun-useful-search-engines-for-writers/

Both students and professional writers use the web for research, marketing and more. Our list of 100 different search tools can help you manage your business, become a better biz tech or web writer, find primary sources, look up translations, and find the more authoritative information out there with minimal effort. Bookmark your favorites to take full advantage of everything they have to offer.

Meta Search Engines

Meta search engines are especially useful because they bring maximum results to you efficiently and accurately.

  1. Draze: Draze compares searches from Google, Yahoo and MSN all at once.
  2. Dogpile: This multi-search engine features a toolbar, SearchSpy tool and more.
  3. ChunkIt!: This sophisticated tool finds hidden content and is great for serious researchers.
  4. Mamma: Let Mamma help your search. You can search for the web, videos, shopping pages, jobs, the Yellow Pages and more.
  5. WebCrawler: This tool features a toolbar as well as the ability to search Google, Live Search, Yahoo! and Ask all at once.
  6. Clusty: This meta search engine groups similar results together for easier browsing.
  7. MsFreckles: Super organized writers can use MsFreckles to streamline their search and pull up all kinds of results, including definitions, text translations and more.
  8. Trexy: Even absentminded writers can manage their research with Trexxy, a search tool that saves your memory without having to bookmark.
  9. ixquick: This tool is very popular in Europe and keeps your personal information private.
  10. Jux2: Find the most relevant information from Google and Yahoo! when you use this tool.

Favorites

These old and new favorites are worth using for general searches.

  1. Google: Still one of the most popular tools, Google is fast and easy to use. Newest versions allow you to set up your own personal page, too.
  2. Alexa: Use the general search tool while comparing site traffic and checking up on your competitors.
  3. Live Search: MSN’s search has gotten quite a makeover. Live Search is a sleek design that can pull up web results, images, video, maps and more.
  4. Yahoo!: Yahoo!’s shortcuts and individual channels make it easier to pinpoint what you’re looking for.
  5. Wikia: For a simple, clean search that depends on community recommendations and input, Wikia is a good choice.

Business Writers… Leer más “100 Fun & Useful Search Engines for Writers [Vintage ’08]”

jQuery webcam plugin

The jQuery webcam plugin is a transparent layer to communicate with a camera directly in JavaScript.
Overview

This plugin provides three different modes to access a webcam through a small API directly with JavaScript – or more precisely jQuery. Thus, it is possible to bring the image on a Canvas (callback mode), to store the image on the server (save mode) and to stream the live image of the Flash element on a Canvas (stream mode). If you just want to download the plugin, click here:


http://www.xarg.org/project/jquery-webcam-plugin/
© 2008-2010 Robert Eisele | http://www.xarg.org/

The jQuery webcam plugin is a transparent layer to communicate with a camera directly in JavaScript.

Overview

This plugin provides three different modes to access a webcam through a small API directly with JavaScript – or more precisely jQuery. Thus, it is possible to bring the image on a Canvas (callback mode), to store the image on the server (save mode) and to stream the live image of the Flash element on a Canvas (stream mode). If you just want to download the plugin, click here:

Download the jQuery webcam plugin

jQuery webcam example

Take a picture after 3 seconds | Take a picture instantly

Available Cameras

  • Laptop Integrated Webcam
  • Google Camera Adapter 0
  • Google Camera Adapter 1

If you activate the filter with the button on the right side of the picture, methods of my already published jQuery plugin xcolor will be used to distort the colors of the Canvas.

General information about the interface

The following snippet describes the interface of the webcam API:

$("#camera").webcam({
        width: 320,
        height: 240,
        mode: "callback",
        swffile: "/download/jscam_canvas_only.swf",
        onTick: function() {},
        onSave: function() {},
        onCapture: function() {},
        debug: function() {},
        onLoad: function() {}
});

Config Parameter

width
The width of the flash movie.

height
The height of the flash movie. Both parameters have to be changed in the Flash file as well. Follow the instructions below to recompile the swf after the size change.

mode
The storage mode can be one of the following: callback, save, stream. Details about the usage of each parameter can be found under the according heading below.

swffile
Points to the swf file of the Flash movie, which provides the webcam API. There are two swf files provided via the download archive: jscam.swf, which provides the full API and jscam_canvas_only.swf which have no embedded JPEG library (I embedded an adjusted JPGEncoder of the AS 3 corelib). Thereby, the file is only one third as large as the original.

onTick, onSave, onCapture
These callbacks are described in detail below, since they change with each mode.

onLoad
The onLoad callback is called as soon as the registration of the interface is done. In the example above, I use the callback to get a list of all cameras available:

onLoad: function() {

    var cams = webcam.getCameraList();
    for(var i in cams) {
        jQuery("#cams").append("<li>" + cams[i] + "</li>");
    }
}

Once the onLoad callback is called, a global object window.webcam is available, which provides the following methods:

  • capture([delay])
    Captures an image internally.
  • save([file])
    Saves the captured image accordingly to the storage mode.
  • getCameraList()
    Get’s an array of available cameras. If no camera is installed, an error is thrown and an empty array is returned.
  • setCamera([index])
    Switches to a different camera. The parameter is the index of the element in the resulting array of getCameraList()

debug
The debug callback is called whenever there is a note or an error you should be notified. In the example above, I just replace the html content of the output container:

debug: function (type, string) {
        $("#status").html(type + ": " + string);
}

Callback Interface Leer más “jQuery webcam plugin”

Is page reading different from screen reading?

I revise effectively both onscreen and on paper, but I revise differently on paper. I work more at a macro scale. I’m more sensitive to proportion and rhythm and timbre. I see spaces and densities better: the clumps where the prose has grown too dense, the wandering of the path where I ramble, the seams that need to be closed, the misaligned joint that I suddenly realize — yeah; there it is! — is where that paragraph from three pages ahead belongs.

As Jonah asks, Why? Is the manuscript’s physicality giving me a greater sense of physical proportion? Does the act of pressing slickened grooves into the page with my fountain pen somehow invite a corresponding mental penetration? Is the curved, flexible rigidity of five sheets in my hand sharpening my awareness of texture? Or perhaps the slowness of my pen relative to the speed of my typing favors this more structural approach — big cross outs, sections circled and moved wholesale, massive reorganizations planned with quick scribbles in the margin — over the finer-grained tweaks and cutting-and-pasting the keyboard seems to encourage.


Thanks to Maryn McKenna for tweeting David Dobbs‘s Wired article: Is page reading different from screen reading? Excerpt (but read the whole article):

I revise effectively both onscreen and on paper, but I revise differently on paper. I work more at a macro scale. I’m more sensitive to proportion and rhythm and timbre. I see spaces and densities better: the clumps where the prose has grown too dense, the wandering of the path where I ramble, the seams that need to be closed, the misaligned joint that I suddenly realize — yeah; there it is! — is where that paragraph from three pages ahead belongs.

As Jonah asks, Why? Is the manuscript’s physicality giving me a greater sense of physical proportion? Does the act of pressing slickened grooves into the page with my fountain pen somehow invite a corresponding mental penetration? Is the curved, flexible rigidity of five sheets in my hand sharpening my awareness of texture? Or perhaps the slowness of my pen relative to the speed of my typing favors this more structural approach — big cross outs, sections circled and moved wholesale, massive reorganizations planned with quick scribbles in the margin — over the finer-grained tweaks and cutting-and-pasting the keyboard seems to encourage. Leer más “Is page reading different from screen reading?”

Have a Journalism Startup Idea? Pitch it to Poynter

The ingredient list for a journalism startup once began with ink, presses and trucks. Now the recipe often starts with a domain, a niche and a strategy. The decline in launch costs has helped inspire a boom in journo startups. But just because it’s easier to start something doesn’t mean it’s easier to succeed.

What many journalism entrepreneurs need most is a path to sustainability. The Poynter Institute can help, thanks to 35 years of journalism training experience and a generous grant from the Ford Foundation.

Make your pitch to Poynter.

Enter Poynter’s competition for online startups and you could win the Poynter Promise Prize. Two winners whose ideas best advance the journalistic ideals of The Poynter Institute (“standing for journalism, serving democracy”) will receive up to $10,000 each in contracted accounting, legal, research or promotion work, plus coaching and mentoring by Poynter faculty and our Ford Fellows in Entrepreneurial Teaching.

Winners will spend up to two weeks this winter at Poynter in St. Petersburg, Fla., receiving guidance on their journalism — and business — idea. Then, over the next six months, we’ll continue to coach the venture.

We’re looking for projects that would benefit most from incubation and whose progress might yield insights for other journalism startups around the country. Your business must already have initial funding, even if it is your own money. You must have an idea for a sustainable business model. You must be willing for Poynter to share our work together so that this project can be both a laboratory and a showcase for lessons learned.

Enter your pitch today. Here’s how:

Create a video by Tuesday, Oct. 12, that describes the news product or service you’re building. E-mail pitch@poynter.org with a link to the video. Include in your message the name of your project and your name and contact info.

Keep your video to under three minutes and tell us the basics of your business idea:

1) The problem/opportunity you seek to address
2) Your solution, or your idea
3) Who else is doing this
4) Your planned revenue streams
5) The skills and credentials of you and your team.


Poynter Online

Posted by Jeremy Caplan (¹)

The ingredient list for a journalism startup once began with ink, presses and trucks. Now the recipe often starts with a domain, a niche and a strategy. The decline in launch costs has helped inspire a boom in journo startups. But just because it’s easier to start something doesn’t mean it’s easier to succeed.

What many journalism entrepreneurs need most is a path to sustainability. The Poynter Institute can help, thanks to 35 years of journalism training experience and a generous grant from the Ford Foundation.

Make your pitch to Poynter.

Enter Poynter’s competition for online startups and you could win the Poynter Promise Prize. Two winners whose ideas best advance the journalistic ideals of The Poynter Institute (“standing for journalism, serving democracy”) will receive up to $10,000 each in contracted accounting, legal, research or promotion work, plus coaching and mentoring by Poynter faculty and our Ford Fellows in Entrepreneurial Teaching.

Winners will spend up to two weeks this winter at Poynter in St. Petersburg, Fla., receiving guidance on their journalism — and business — idea. Then, over the next six months, we’ll continue to coach the venture.

We’re looking for projects that would benefit most from incubation and whose progress might yield insights for other journalism startups around the country. Your business must already have initial funding, even if it is your own money. You must have an idea for a sustainable business model. You must be willing for Poynter to share our work together so that this project can be both a laboratory and a showcase for lessons learned.

Enter your pitch today. Here’s how:

Create a video by Tuesday, Oct. 12, that describes the news product or service you’re building. E-mail pitch@poynter.org with a link to the video. Include in your message the name of your project and your name and contact info.

Keep your video to under three minutes and tell us the basics of your business idea:

1) The problem/opportunity you seek to address
2) Your solution, or your idea
3) Who else is doing this
4) Your planned revenue streams
5) The skills and credentials of you and your team. Leer más “Have a Journalism Startup Idea? Pitch it to Poynter”

Most Americans still don’t have smartphones

Editor’s note: Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

(CNN) — If you’re a tech news junkie (and that’s why you’re reading CNN.com Tech, right?), you might have gotten the impression that everyone already has — or at least wants — a smartphone. Or that smartphones and tablets are the only mobile devices that matter.

But new research from Forrester indicates that while cell phone penetration is high across all U.S. demographics (82 percent of consumers own a cell phone, and 73 percent report that cell phones are their “most used device”), only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone.

This is true even among the most digitally savvy generations: Gen X (roughly ages 31-40) and Gen Y (roughly ages 18-30).

According to Forrester, Gen Yers and Gen Xers are most likely to own smartphones. However, less than one-fourth of cell phone users in both of those age groups own a smartphone.

Also, Forrester reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.

All of which means that the vast majority (more than 75 percent) of the “digital native” generations does not use smartphones. Instead, they rely on cheaper, simpler-feature phones and limited access to mobile data-supported services.

Of course, feature phones are getting smarter. Many of the the most popular feature phones can do a lot beyond voice calls — from text and multimedia messaging to e-mail, to social media, to web browsing, to even running simple apps based on JavaME.

Granted, feature phones generally offer a more difficult and limited digital experience (especially for web browsing). But that doesn’t stop people from using feature phones in sophisticated ways.

In fact, according to Forrester’s figures, just under half of all U.S. mobile owners have internet access from their cell phone. So, since only 17 percent of U.S. cell users have a smartphone, this means that the vast majority of Americans who are able access the mobile internet use feature phones.

But being able to do something is not the same as actually doing it. Just under a quarter of U.S. mobile owners report going online from their phones.

The simplest mobile activities remain the most popular across all types of cell phones. Topping Forrester’s list is SMS text messaging, which nearly 60 percent of all U.S. mobile owners use.

Despite the booming popularity of social networks like Facebook and Twitter, Forrester found that social networking services are one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions: Only 14 percent of U.S. mobile users access such services from their phones.

In this report, Forrester seems to be trying to spin its findings to make smartphones sound like the most important current mobile trend. For instance, the report says, “Gen Yers and Gen Xers are the most likely to have smartphones and unlimited data plans, providing the tools needed to lead in mobile Internet adoption” — despite the fact that they’re describing the behavior of a minority in that age range.


Forrester Research reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.
Forrester Research reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone, a Forrester study finds
  • Less than a fourth of cell phone users in Gen X and Gen Y own a smartphone, study says
  • Study indicates social networking is one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions
  • But smartphones have spurred considerable growth in, and demand for, mobile services
RELATED TOPICS

Editor’s note: Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

(CNN) — If you’re a tech news junkie (and that’s why you’re reading CNN.com Tech, right?), you might have gotten the impression that everyone already has — or at least wants — a smartphone. Or that smartphones and tablets are the only mobile devices that matter.

But new research from Forrester indicates that while cell phone penetration is high across all U.S. demographics (82 percent of consumers own a cell phone, and 73 percent report that cell phones are their “most used device”), only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone.

This is true even among the most digitally savvy generations: Gen X (roughly ages 31-40) and Gen Y (roughly ages 18-30).

According to Forrester, Gen Yers and Gen Xers are most likely to own smartphones. However, less than one-fourth of cell phone users in both of those age groups own a smartphone.

Also, Forrester reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.

All of which means that the vast majority (more than 75 percent) of the “digital native” generations does not use smartphones. Instead, they rely on cheaper, simpler-feature phones and limited access to mobile data-supported services.

Of course, feature phones are getting smarter. Many of the the most popular feature phones can do a lot beyond voice calls — from text and multimedia messaging to e-mail, to social media, to web browsing, to even running simple apps based on JavaME.

Granted, feature phones generally offer a more difficult and limited digital experience (especially for web browsing). But that doesn’t stop people from using feature phones in sophisticated ways.

In fact, according to Forrester’s figures, just under half of all U.S. mobile owners have internet access from their cell phone. So, since only 17 percent of U.S. cell users have a smartphone, this means that the vast majority of Americans who are able access the mobile internet use feature phones.

But being able to do something is not the same as actually doing it. Just under a quarter of U.S. mobile owners report going online from their phones.

The simplest mobile activities remain the most popular across all types of cell phones. Topping Forrester’s list is SMS text messaging, which nearly 60 percent of all U.S. mobile owners use.

Despite the booming popularity of social networks like Facebook and Twitter, Forrester found that social networking services are one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions: Only 14 percent of U.S. mobile users access such services from their phones.

In this report, Forrester seems to be trying to spin its findings to make smartphones sound like the most important current mobile trend. For instance, the report says, “Gen Yers and Gen Xers are the most likely to have smartphones and unlimited data plans, providing the tools needed to lead in mobile Internet adoption” — despite the fact that they’re describing the behavior of a minority in that age range. Leer más “Most Americans still don’t have smartphones”