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Estaremos nuevamente actualizando la información a partir del lunes 1 de Octubre.
Nos vemos pronto.

A few days on vacation, just that a few days
We will be updating the information again on Monday 1 October.
C u soon!

G.

Is Data Overload Killing Our Creativity?

The Neurological and Creative Toll of Digital Overload

If you’re like a lot of people, during your work day you might check 40 websites. You could be switching between programs such as Word and Excel and your email application 36 times an hour. You probably stop what you’re doing — or at least pause — when a text message buzzes or an email comes in or your cell phone rings.

Matt Richtel, technology reporter for the New York Times, says in an interview on the NPR program Fresh Air that for all the productivity upsides to digital consumption, there are huge downsides, too, including changes in the brain that seem to affect not just the ability to engage in conversation but the ability to be creative, too.

“Twenty years of glorifying all technology as if all computers were good and all use of it was good, I think science is beginning to embrace the idea that some technology is Twinkies and some technology is Brussels sprouts,” Richtel says. “If we consume too much technology, just like if we consume too much food, it can have ill effects. And that is the moment in time we find ourselves in . . .with the way we are digesting, if you will, technology all over the place.”

Richtel notices, he says, that he’s “not quite as engaged in my world when I’m constantly using devices as I am when I’m away from them.” Away from them, “I can give myself over to conversations a little bit differently.”

Awarded a Pulitzer Prize this year for his Times series “Driven to Distraction,” about the dangers of driving while multitasking with cell phones and other devices, Richtel says that the digital glut appears to not just increase distraction but decrease creativity.


New York Times reporter Matt Richtel says that too much digital consumption and a steady stream of distraction appear to change the brain and affect our ability to be creative.

The Neurological and Creative Toll of Digital Overload

If you’re like a lot of people, during your work day you might check 40 websites. You could be switching between programs such as Word and Excel and your email application 36 times an hour. You probably stop what you’re doing — or at least pause — when a text message buzzes or an email comes in or your cell phone rings.

Matt Richtel, technology reporter for the New York Times, says in an interview on the NPR program Fresh Air that for all the productivity upsides to digital consumption, there are huge downsides, too, including changes in the brain that seem to affect not just the ability to engage in conversation but the ability to be creative, too.

“Twenty years of glorifying all technology as if all computers were good and all use of it was good, I think science is beginning to embrace the idea that some technology is Twinkies and some technology is Brussels sprouts,” Richtel says. “If we consume too much technology, just like if we consume too much food, it can have ill effects. And that is the moment in time we find ourselves in . . .with the way we are digesting, if you will, technology all over the place.”

Richtel notices, he says, that he’s “not quite as engaged in my world when I’m constantly using devices as I am when I’m away from them.” Away from them, “I can give myself over to conversations a little bit differently.”

Awarded a Pulitzer Prize this year for his Times series “Driven to Distraction,” about the dangers of driving while multitasking with cell phones and other devices, Richtel says that the digital glut appears to not just increase distraction but decrease creativity. Leer más “Is Data Overload Killing Our Creativity?”

10 Data Points: Information and Analytics at Work

The New Intelligent Enterprise inquiry is all about the intensifying wave of data that organizations are facing, and its implications for managers. Companies are becoming data driven in ways that are new, raw and — in many cases — untested. And now so are we: We’re trying something new by letting the data come first, without a lot of editing or parsing. Here is a slice of the raw goods, a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the data we gathered from our survey of nearly 3,000 managers and executives from every major industry and all regions of the globe. (Also see “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey.”)

We chose these 10 charts to share because they captured our attention. Some are provocative, some are telling, and some raise questions we haven’t even tried to answer yet. They’re by no means comprehensive, and our final report will cover many more points accompanied by rigorous analysis. But we do think you’ll find these graphics worth a look if for no other reason than that they allow you to do some immediate benchmarking. How does your organization compare with others? What are your peers doing, and how might that influence decisions you’re considering right now?

The survey respondents answered two questions that allowed us to group them and their answers in some interesting ways. One question asked them to assess where their organization is along the journey to an ideal state: an organization that has been “transformed by better ways to collect, analyze and be prescriptively guided by information.” Those that were farthest along that path we deemed Sophisticates; those who were midway became Intermediates; while those that were just beginning to look at data and analytics we called Starters.

We also asked them to describe their organization’s competitive position. Those that rated themselves as substantially outperforming their industry peers we named Top Performers. Those that were underperforming we labeled Lower Performers. You’ll note both groups called out in the accompanying charts.
1. Innovation is the Top Business Challenge

More than 60% of all respondents chose innovation for competitive differentiation as their main business challenge over the next two years. In a recessionary business climate, doing more with the resources and talent you already have is always a favored strategy. When we parsed the data, we found that Starters (new users of analytics) were entrenched in “survival mode,” focused on cuttings costs and creating efficiencies as their main challenge. Intermediates (moderate users of analytics) were in “growth mode,” focused on growing revenues. Sophisticates (advanced users of analytics) were in an “expansion mode,” focused on growing revenues and expanding their customer base through acquisition or retention strategies, perhaps because their use of analytics had already helped them optimize their operations and general growth approaches.


http://sloanreview.mit.edu/the-magazine/articles/2010/fall/521150/10-data-points-information-and-analytics-at-work/

By Nina Kruschwitz and Rebecca Shockley

Early returns are in from the first annual New Intelligent Enterprise Survey. Here are major highlights of what executives and managers said about how they are — or are not — capitalizing on information.


The New Intelligent Enterprise inquiry is all about the intensifying wave of data that organizations are facing, and its implications for managers. Companies are becoming data driven in ways that are new, raw and — in many cases — untested. And now so are we: We’re trying something new by letting the data come first, without a lot of editing or parsing. Here is a slice of the raw goods, a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the data we gathered from our survey of nearly 3,000 managers and executives from every major industry and all regions of the globe. (Also see “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey.”)

We chose these 10 charts to share because they captured our attention. Some are provocative, some are telling, and some raise questions we haven’t even tried to answer yet. They’re by no means comprehensive, and our final report will cover many more points accompanied by rigorous analysis. But we do think you’ll find these graphics worth a look if for no other reason than that they allow you to do some immediate benchmarking. How does your organization compare with others? What are your peers doing, and how might that influence decisions you’re considering right now?

The survey respondents answered two questions that allowed us to group them and their answers in some interesting ways. One question asked them to assess where their organization is along the journey to an ideal state: an organization that has been “transformed by better ways to collect, analyze and be prescriptively guided by information.” Those that were farthest along that path we deemed Sophisticates; those who were midway became Intermediates; while those that were just beginning to look at data and analytics we called Starters.

We also asked them to describe their organization’s competitive position. Those that rated themselves as substantially outperforming their industry peers we named Top Performers. Those that were underperforming we labeled Lower Performers. You’ll note both groups called out in the accompanying charts.

1. Innovation is the Top Business Challenge

More than 60% of all respondents chose innovation for competitive differentiation as their main business challenge over the next two years. In a recessionary business climate, doing more with the resources and talent you already have is always a favored strategy. When we parsed the data, we found that Starters (new users of analytics) were entrenched in “survival mode,” focused on cuttings costs and creating efficiencies as their main challenge. Intermediates (moderate users of analytics) were in “growth mode,” focused on growing revenues. Sophisticates (advanced users of analytics) were in an “expansion mode,” focused on growing revenues and expanding their customer base through acquisition or retention strategies, perhaps because their use of analytics had already helped them optimize their operations and general growth approaches.

David Schlesinger las reglas del periodismo en un cambio constante

Habla David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de la legendaria agencia de noticias Reuters;

Cambiando el periodismo, cambiando a Reuters.
David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de Reuters News

Estas son las reglas del periodismo hoy

1. Conocer la historia que cuentas no es suficiente.

2. Contar la noticia es sólo el principio.

3. La conversación sobre la historia es tan importante como la noticia misma.


Más información y artículos en
http://www.5wh.info | Comunicación para comunicadores

Habla David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de la legendaria agencia de noticias Reuters

Cambiando el periodismo, cambiando a Reuters.
David Schlesinger, Editor Jefe de Reuters News

Estas son las reglas del periodismo hoy

1. Conocer la historia que cuentas no es suficiente.

2. Contar la noticia es sólo el principio.

3. La conversación sobre la historia es tan importante como la noticia misma. Leer más “David Schlesinger las reglas del periodismo en un cambio constante”

Leaders’ social values drive staff loyalty, study finds

“They listen to what they say, they look at the decisions they make, sometimes it’s very subtle,” she told CNN.
If you’re lucky enough to go through the ranks and selection, you’ve already proven that you are able to do the job. The question is, how do you define the job.
–Anne S. Tsui, W. P. Carey School of Business Management Professor

“If you’re lucky enough to go through the ranks and selection and (become a CEO), you’ve already proven that you are, in most cases, able to do the job. The question is, how do you define the job,” she said.

“Researchers and companies that do executive training know that executives who are very charismatic have a strong vision about the company and they talk a very good language of rallying the whole company towards this mission, which is ‘let’s do it all for the company,’ and ‘it’s good to do things for our society.'”


Warren Buffett is known for his interest in social values.
Warren Buffett is known for his interest in social values.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Chinese study finds employees are happier, and more likely to stay at a company, if their leaders clearly indicate social values
  • Employee loyalty related to whether a leader’s personal social values matched his or her outward statements
  • But middle management pick up quickly if there’s dissonance between what a CEO says and does
  • And “it’s a given” that business leaders should “know how to make money”

(CNN) — New research shows that managers can benefit from bringing values into the workplace, as long as they do it right.

A study of CEOs and their middle management in China found that employees were happier, and more likely to stay at a company, if their leaders clearly indicated social values — but also followed through in their private actions.

The study of CEOs and their underlings’ happiness was carried out by W. P. Carey School of Business Management Professor Anne S. Tsui, Ping Ping Fu of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Jun Liu of Renmin University of China, and Lan Li of Chinese Entrepreneur Survey System.

Over the course of five years, Tsui and her collaborators studied CEOs and their subordinates at 42 companies in China. They asked both groups about the CEOs’ perceived values, and measured middle managers’ commitment to the company or likelihood of jumping ship.

They found that employee loyalty related to whether a leader’s personal social values matched his or her outward statements.

Tsui said that because corporate leaders communicate their values through every-day actions, typically middle managers can’t help but pick up on their bosses’ values. Leer más “Leaders’ social values drive staff loyalty, study finds”

Jeep: por fin un anuncio de coches diferente


http://www.javierregueira.com/reflexiones-irreverentes-sobre-marcas-y-consumidores/2010/10/jeep-por-fin-un-anuncio-de-coches-diferente.html

Por más que lo he buscado, los señores de Jeep no han tenido la vista de facilitar la viralización de su nueva historia e.d. no hay ni rastro del spot ni puedes bajártelo de su web, así que para verlo no te quedará otra que visitarla:

Jeep

Me parece un buen ejemplo de cómo añadir relevancia en un mercado gris donde casi todas las marcas utilizan los mismos mensajes cansinos.

¿Un ejemplo de mensajes cansinos? Mirad lo que esta misma marca hacía hace dos años…:

Leer más "Jeep: por fin un anuncio de coches diferente"

6 pasos para transformar a un CEO tradicional en un CEO “social”

El 64% de los consejeros delegados de las principales compañías del mundo no tiene presencia en las redes sociales. Es uno de los principales datos que revelaba el estudio “Socialising Your CEO: From (Un)Social to Social” de Weber Shandwick. Es decir, los CEO’s de las 50 compañías líderes del mundo no son “sociales”, no utilizan el entorno digital y los medios sociales para contactar y conversar. Pero ¿qué es un CEO “social”?:

– Dirigen compañías con una elevada reputación. Los CEOs más admirados de nuestro estudio tenían perfiles con una visibilidad online mayor que aquellos CEOs menos admirados (41% frente a un 28% respectivamente).

– Actúan en distintas plataformas. El 72% de los “CEOs sociales” emplea más de un canal cuando interactúa de forma online. Un “CEOs social” utiliza de media 1,8 canales.

– Suelen proceder de compañías americanas. Los CEOs de las compañías con sede en Estados Unidos tienen mayor tendencia a interactuar online que aquellas situadas en EMEA (60% frente al 12% respectivamente). A pesar de que la dimensión de los CEOs de Asia Pacífico y Latinoamérica es demasiado pequeña como para permitir una comparación fiable, hay indicios de que estos también se encuentran en niveles bajos.

– Tienen una extensa trayectoria. Los CEOs que llevan poco tiempo en su cargo (hasta 3 años) tienen una menor tendencia a involucrarse de forma online con respecto a aquellos CEOs que llevan un tiempo moderado (entre 3 y 5 años) o los que llevan un periodo de tiempo más extenso (más de 5 años), representando el 30% frente al 38% y al 43% respectivamente.


http://www.marketingdirecto.com/actualidad/social-media-marketing/6-pasos-para-transformar-a-un-ceo-tradicional-en-un-ceo-social/

El 64% de los consejeros delegados de las principales compañías del mundo no tiene presencia en las redes sociales. Es uno de los principales datos que revelaba el estudio “Socialising Your CEO: From (Un)Social to Social” de Weber Shandwick. Es decir, los CEO’s de las 50 compañías líderes del mundo no son “sociales”, no utilizan el entorno digital y los medios sociales para contactar y conversar. Pero ¿qué es un CEO “social”?:

– Dirigen compañías con una elevada reputación. Los CEOs más admirados de nuestro estudio tenían perfiles con una visibilidad online mayor que aquellos CEOs menos admirados (41% frente a un 28% respectivamente).

– Actúan en distintas plataformas. El 72% de los “CEOs sociales” emplea más de un canal cuando interactúa de forma online. Un “CEOs social” utiliza de media 1,8 canales.

– Suelen proceder de compañías americanas. Los CEOs de las compañías con sede en Estados Unidos tienen mayor tendencia a interactuar online que aquellas situadas en EMEA (60% frente al 12% respectivamente). A pesar de que la dimensión de los CEOs de Asia Pacífico y Latinoamérica es demasiado pequeña como para permitir una comparación fiable, hay indicios de que estos también se encuentran en niveles bajos.

Tienen una extensa trayectoria. Los CEOs que llevan poco tiempo en su cargo (hasta 3 años) tienen una menor tendencia a involucrarse de forma online con respecto a aquellos CEOs que llevan un tiempo moderado (entre 3 y 5 años) o los que llevan un periodo de tiempo más extenso (más de 5 años), representando el 30% frente al 38% y al 43% respectivamente. Leer más “6 pasos para transformar a un CEO tradicional en un CEO “social””