OK, maybe not so urgent

National IT team for this pilot fish’s organization sends out an urgent security alert to forward to all local users — with a message attached.

“The message was a phishing spam,” says fish. “And a poorly disguised one at that, full of misspellings in its instructions to follow a link and fill in a form to reactivate e-mail.

“But the alert message contained the live link, and there was no way I was going to send this to my users. So I waited to see what developed.”

A few moments later, fish’s regional manager forwards the same message, with the same live link, and instructs everyone on the mailing list to warn their local users.


National IT team for this pilot fish’s organization sends out an urgent security alert to forward to all local users — with a message attached.

“The message was a phishing spam,” says fish. “And a poorly disguised one at that, full of misspellings in its instructions to follow a link and fill in a form to reactivate e-mail.

“But the alert message contained the live link, and there was no way I was going to send this to my users. So I waited to see what developed.”

A few moments later, fish’s regional manager forwards the same message, with the same live link, and instructs everyone on the mailing list to warn their local users.

Fish waits some more.

Just a few minutes after that, a different national manager sends out a response to the first e-mail, instructing everyone to not send out the original “live link” message, but use his clean version that has the address removed.

That’s better, fish thinks, but I’ll still wait.

Then fish’s regional manager forwards the new message with the link removed.

Fish waits.

Next comes a message from the original national IT team lead, trying to recall the original “live link” message.

Fish decides he’s glad he waited, and figures he’ll wait a little longer.

Finally comes one more message in the thread, instructing everyone, “disregard and delete this message. More information will follow.”

Reports fish: “That was last week, and the last we heard of it.

“I considered warning my users about IT management messages, but I think they already know.”

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http://blogs.computerworld.com/16991/ok_maybe_not_so_urgent

Autor: Gabriel Catalano - human being | (#IN).perfección®

Lo importante es el camino que recorremos, las metas son apenas el resultado de ese recorrido. Llegar generalmente significa, volver a empezar!