Why the Old Recruiting Skills Are Dead, and Four Essential New Ones

There has never been a more challenging time to be a corporate recruiter. Hiring managers are very demanding and expect fast, personalized service by knowledgeable recruiters. Given the current unemployment rate and the perceived availability of talent, they may be unrealistic in what they expect. Nonetheless, they are the primary customer and need to be provided service at a high level. Candidates, too, are not what they used to be. The talented and highly in-demand candidates also want to be given fast, personalized service by an ethical and in-the-know recruiter.

All of this means that the skills that once defined a successful corporate recruiter are not sufficient. Indeed, those skills may even be detrimental to success.

A corporate recruiter has always had a different skill set than a recruiter working in an agency or as an independent. While agency recruiters have focused on building relationships (often in deep, vertical job families), on tapping into new sources of candidates, and on assessing candidates against a variety of criteria, the corporate recruiter has evolved three very different set of competencies over the years.

The first is the ability to facilitate hiring. These recruiters are adept at dealing with the corporate bureaucracy and legal issues. They are formidable navigators of the corporate landscape. They know every hill and valley, every bomb and sinkhole. These skills are unique to a particular company and do not transfer well. Recruiters with these competencies are most likely to have worked for the same firm for many years. Every bureaucracy has created people with these types of skills and could not function without them. The internal knowledge they have, and their ability to get things done in systems resistant to getting things done, makes them valuable, but only in that system. While this may seem as if it is practical and useful, the skills usually fail completely to help the recruiter navigate a talent-constrained marketplace, find the rare candidates, or convince them to work for the organization.

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There has never been a more challenging time to be a corporate recruiter. Hiring managers are very demanding and expect fast, personalized service by knowledgeable recruiters. Given the current unemployment rate and the perceived availability of talent, they may be unrealistic in what they expect. Nonetheless, they are the primary customer and need to be provided service at a high level. Candidates, too, are not what they used to be. The talented and highly in-demand candidates also want to be given fast, personalized service by an ethical and in-the-know recruiter.

All of this means that the skills that once defined a successful corporate recruiter are not sufficient. Indeed, those skills may even be detrimental to success.

A corporate recruiter has always had a different skill set than a recruiter working in an agency or as an independent. While agency recruiters have focused on building relationships (often in deep, vertical job families), on tapping into new sources of candidates, and on assessing candidates against a variety of criteria, the corporate recruiter has evolved three very different set of competencies over the years.

The first is the ability to facilitate hiring. These recruiters are adept at dealing with the corporate bureaucracy and legal issues. They are formidable navigators of the corporate landscape. They know every hill and valley, every bomb and sinkhole. These skills are unique to a particular company and do not transfer well. Recruiters with these competencies are most likely to have worked for the same firm for many years. Every bureaucracy has created people with these types of skills and could not function without them. The internal knowledge they have, and their ability to get things done in systems resistant to getting things done, makes them valuable, but only in that system. While this may seem as if it is practical and useful, the skills usually fail completely to help the recruiter navigate a talent-constrained marketplace, find the rare candidates, or convince them to work for the organization. Leer más “Why the Old Recruiting Skills Are Dead, and Four Essential New Ones”

Innovando en comunicación

Frente a los cambios que experimentan los consumidores, los medios de comunicación y los anunciantes, creo que es necesario hacer un replanteamiento de cómo innovamos en comunicación. Para poder hacer este replanteamiento es necesario entender que no solucionaremos los problemas actuales con procesos del pasado. Debemos crear equipos multidisciplinares, romper barreras mentales de nuestros equipos, buscar nuevos partnerships y ayudar al equipo a reinventarse. Innovación es la palabra clave, y debemos buscar la fórmula de introducir esta palabra en nuestros planes y en nuestro día a día.

Así que hoy me gustaría hacer un repaso de los niveles de innovación en comunicación. Para ilustrarlo he planteado el siguiente esquema:


por Fernando de la Rosa | //marketingcomunidad.com

Frente a los cambios que experimentan los consumidores, los medios de comunicación y los anunciantes, creo que es necesario hacer un replanteamiento de cómo innovamos en comunicación. Para poder hacer este replanteamiento es necesario entender que no solucionaremos los problemas actuales con procesos del pasado. Debemos crear equipos multidisciplinares, romper barreras mentales de nuestros equipos, buscar nuevos partnerships y ayudar al equipo a reinventarse. Innovación es la palabra clave, y debemos buscar la fórmula de introducir esta palabra en nuestros planes y en nuestro día a día.

Así que hoy me gustaría hacer un repaso de los niveles de innovación en comunicación. Para ilustrarlo he planteado el siguiente esquema: Leer más “Innovando en comunicación”

Get smart before your next meeting or presentation

The point wasn’t being a know-it-all, it was about knowing the context so I could tailor my remarks or presentation to the situation. After a while, I started to send the parse to my contact at the prospect company to see if I got it right. You’d be surprised that in many situations, my contact didn’t know half of that I’d dug up! In every case, my confidence was higher because I had the power of knowledge.

Same goes with any presentation. Always research your audience: Their emotions, the context they are working in, their competitive situation and trends in the industry that impact them. Show up the night before and talk to your future audience to verify your understanding. The most important piece of intel to gather is the business model they’re operating under, and where their upside and leakage occurs. This information allows you to point remarks to action items that make a difference. This will dramatically improve the effectiveness of any presentation you make.


//sanderssays.typepad.com
Never have a meeting or make a presentation without doing your homework.

What is your homework?  Context.  This is a habit I developed at Yahoo!, and recommend to everyone I know.  When you are going to make a sales call or take a meeting with a new company/person – do some background research so you know the context of the situation.

For example, at Yahoo!, every time we’d engage with a new prospect, we’d fully research their history (via Hoovers, stock ticker, their website), news coverage of the company, bios of individuals in the meeting and the competitive landscape.  I’d budget about three hours for a thirty minute meeting.  I’d combine all the research into a ‘parse‘ – short for a parsed up brief of the company and participants in the meeting. Leer más “Get smart before your next meeting or presentation”

Recession-Beating Success Strategy: Revive Your Brand

Remember Circuit City? Bet you think the electronics chain went out of business in early 2009. But actually, they’re back. Another company bought the brand name just a few months later and relaunched Circuit City as a leaner, meaner, no-doubt-more-profitable ecommerce site.

They’re not the only old-time brand making a comeback, either. If these stone-dead companies can find a way to revive their brand and get customers buying again, small businesses can do it, too.
Besides, Circuit City, brands that are on the comeback trail include:
Chock Full O Nuts — Sing it with me now: “Chock Full O Nuts is that heavenly coffee…better coffee a millionaire’s money can’t buy.” Despite the well-known jingle, this 80-year-old brand had faded to obscurity, and the coffee-shop chain closed in the 1980s. But earlier this month, the company’s first new coffee shop in decades opened in New York City. When the New York Daily News wrote about it, nearly 400 people liked the story on Facebook. Clearly, just the mention of this old brand had many riding a wave of pleasant nostalgia.
Commodore — Wow, what a yesterday brand in computing, huh? For those too young to remember, Commodore’s C64 was a popular early personal computer, but the company failed to keep up with the pace of change in PCs and went bust waaaay back in 1994. But it’s coming back — Florida entrepreneur Barry Altman is relaunching the brand with a $30 million marketing effort.


By: Carol Tice | //blog.entrepreneur.com

Remember Circuit City? Bet you think the electronics chain went out of business in early 2009. But actually, they’re back. Another company bought the brand name just a few months later and relaunched Circuit City as a leaner, meaner, no-doubt-more-profitable ecommerce site.
They’re not the only old-time brand making a comeback, either. If these stone-dead companies can find a way to revive their brand and get customers buying again, small businesses can do it, too.

Besides, Circuit City, brands that are on the comeback trail include:

Chock Full O Nuts — Sing it with me now: “Chock Full O Nuts is that heavenly coffee…better coffee a millionaire’s money can’t buy.” Despite the well-known jingle, this 80-year-old brand had faded to obscurity, and the coffee-shop chain closed in the 1980s. But earlier this month, the company’s first new coffee shop in decades opened in New York City. When the New York Daily News wrote about it, nearly 400 people liked the story on Facebook. Clearly, just the mention of this old brand had many riding a wave of pleasant nostalgia.
Commodore — Wow, what a yesterday brand in computing, huh? For those too young to remember, Commodore’s C64 was a popular early personal computer, but the company failed to keep up with the pace of change in PCs and went bust waaaay back in 1994. But it’s coming back — Florida entrepreneur Barry Altman is relaunching the brand with a $30 million marketing effort.

The Mobile Marketing Dictionary

In today’s mobile application world, the terminology and technology can move faster than the creative thinkers and businesses, and we at Social Times thought we could help by putting together the Mobile Marketing Dictionary. The dictionary has all the terms that you’re going to encounter as you try to buy advertising on mobile applications, publish advertising on your own mobile application or get installations for your mobile app. Read the dictionary below and please let us know if there’s a term you’re curious about or one we missed.

Check out the mobile marketing dictionary…


http://www.socialtimes.com/mobile-marketing-dictionary/

In today’s mobile application world, the terminology and technology can move faster than the creative thinkers and businesses, and we at Social Times thought we could help by putting together the Mobile Marketing Dictionary.  The dictionary has all the terms that you’re going to encounter as you try to buy advertising on mobile applications, publish advertising on your own mobile application or get installations for your mobile app.  Read the dictionary below and please let us know if there’s a term you’re curious about or one we missed.

Check out the mobile marketing dictionary… Leer más “The Mobile Marketing Dictionary”

Se crea un billete digital en el móvil

Madrid y Barcelona serán las primeras ciudades donde poder utilizar este sistema desde hoy mismo. Málaga, Ibiza y Palma de Mallorca serán los siguientes aeropuertos, estrenando este sistema a partir del próximo 28 de septiembre. Este servicio, además, será válido en todas las rutas de British Airways.

“Aprovechar las nuevas tecnologías para mejorar la experiencia del cliente es clave en nuestra estrategia”, destacó el director comercial de BA para España, Portugal y Gibraltar, Jordi Porcel. Porcel resaltó también que este nuevo formato digital evita tener que imprimir las tarjetas, lo que ayuda a mejorar el compromiso con el medio ambiente “al reducir en gran medida el gasto de papel”.

Este sistema, además, facilitará los viajes de los socios del Executive Club que vuelen al extranjero y no tengan dónde imprimir la tarjeta de embarque de regreso. “En definitiva, se trata de ayudar al cliente y hacer su viaje más cómodo”, destacó el director de marketing digital de BA, Chris Davies.

British Airways fue la primera compañía que lanzó una aplicación iPhone para sus clientes en el Reino Unido. Desde entonces, más de medio millón de usuarios se la han descargado de iTunes. A partir de ahora, también los usuarios de Blackberry y Android podrán acceder a toda la información de sus reservas, vuelos, noticias del Executive Club, etc.


British Airways permite utilizar el teléfono como tarjeta de embarque

British Airways (BA), en pleno proceso de fusión con Iberia, ha desarrollado un nuevo sistema de embarque que permite utilizar los teléfonos ”smartphones” de los viajeros como una tarjeta de embarque digital que se reproduce en el propio móvil y que puede escanearse antes de subir al avión.

Aviones de British Airways . – Bloomberg

Ep – Madrid21/09/2010

British Airways (BA), en pleno proceso de fusión con Iberia, ha desarrollado un nuevo sistema de embarque que permite utilizar los teléfonos ”smartphones” de los viajeros como una tarjeta de embarque digital que se reproduce en el propio móvil y que puede escanearse antes de subir al avión.

Para usar este nuevo sistema es necesario formar parte del Executive Club, el programa de fidelización de BA, para lo que tan sólo hay que darse de alta en la página web de la aerolínea. Una vez ahí, basta con descargar la aplicación adecuada para cada tipo de teléfono (iPhone, Blackberry y teléfonos con Android) y ya podrá consultar la cuenta, los datos de los vuelos y toda la información necesaria para viajar en avión. Leer más “Se crea un billete digital en el móvil”

Blockbuster Bankruptcy: A Decade of Decline

Months ago, the mere mention of bankruptcy in an article about Blockbuster would provoke seething responses from company reps. On more than one occasion, I received fuming messages from Blockbuster about how bankruptcy was a “worst-case scenario” that was nothing more than “a last resort.”

Now the worst case scenario has arrived. Rumors of Chapter 11 began to bubble in August, and Bloomberg reports that Blockbuster will file for bankruptcy Thursday.

We’ve already presented the best of Blockbuster’s bad metaphors. Here, we present a timeline of how the video rental giant fell.

1985: First Blockbuster store opens in Dallas.

1994: Viacom acquires Blockbuster for $8.4 billion.


BY Austin Carr | //fastcompany.com

Months ago, the mere mention of bankruptcy in an article about Blockbuster would provoke seething responses from company reps. On more than one occasion, I received fuming messages from Blockbuster about how bankruptcy was a “worst-case scenario” that was nothing more than “a last resort.”

Now the worst case scenario has arrived. Rumors of Chapter 11 began to bubble in August, and Bloomberg reports that Blockbuster will file for bankruptcy Thursday.

We’ve already presented the best of Blockbuster’s bad metaphors. Here, we present a timeline of how the video rental giant fell.

1985: First Blockbuster store opens in Dallas.

1994: Viacom acquires Blockbuster for $8.4 billion. Leer más “Blockbuster Bankruptcy: A Decade of Decline”