Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft

For the first time, Internet Explorer now sports cutting-edge support for HTML5, the collection of emerging standards that permit sites to deliver slicker graphics and typography, richer interfaces that feel more like traditional software and video that doesn’t require a plug-in such as Adobe Flash. Like an eye-popping 3-D game, the software takes full advantage of your PC’s graphics hardware, enabling glitzy animation at high speeds. (See pictures of vintage computers.)

This browser is so on top of next-generation Web technologies, in fact, that it has zipped ahead of most of the Web itself. For now, the most impressive evidence of its capabilities are demos that Microsoft and its partners have ginned up. But when better sites are built, IE9 will be ready.

Not being ready for the new Web wasn’t really an option for Microsoft. Research firm Net Applications says that Internet Explorer retains 60% of the browser market, but it long ago lost the confidence and attention of most of the people who care enough about browsers to make a considered choice. (On my site, Technologizer, it’s only the third most popular browser — Firefox and Chrome are No. 1 and No. 2.) IE9 is the first version in eons that gives browser enthusiasts something to be enthusiastic about.

Still, I don’t see Internet Explorer ever again crushing the competition like it once did. Too many excellent options are just a free download away: Firefox, Chrome, Apple’s Safari (available for Windows as well as Macs) and Norwegian underdog Opera. I also like Flock, which is based on the same underpinnings as Chrome, but with built-in features relating to Facebook, Twitter and other forms of online socializing. (See the best social-networking applications.)

Anuncios

By Harry McCracken | //time.com

Like many of us, Microsoft does its best work when it’s running scared. Back in the mid-1990s, when Bill Gates & Co. thought that pioneering Web browser Netscape Navigator posed an existential threat to Windows, they responded by bundling their own new browser, Internet Explorer, with Windows 95. That led to the little legal kerfuffle known as United States v. Microsoft. But the truth is that Internet Explorer got so good so quickly that things would have been dicey for Netscape no matter what.

Microsoft’s share of the browser market passed 90% early in this century. With Netscape vanquished, the Internet Explorer team went into hibernation, ignoring the software until it was an embarrassing, archaic mess. Even versions 7 and 8 — released after an army of volunteer geeks resuscitated Navigator as Firefox in 2004 and began chipping away at Explorer’s monopoly — weren’t exactly scintillating. (See the 50 best websites of 2010.)

Last week, Microsoft unveiled the first beta release of Internet Explorer 9, or IE9 for short. It’s easily the most impressive browser upgrade to hail from Redmond, Wash., since the original skirmishes with Netscape. And I don’t think it’s mere coincidence that it’s the first one the company has hatched since its scariest current competitor, Google, got into the browser business by launching Chrome two years ago this month.

As beta software, IE9 is by definition a somewhat glitchy work in progress. Past Internet Explorer upgrade schedules suggest that the final version will show up sometime in 2011. If you’re curious — and not overly cautious — go ahead and download the beta here.

(One new Internet Explorer feature shuts out a sizable percentage of its potential user base: it now works only with Windows 7 and Windows Vista. Sorry, XP holdouts — Microsoft isn’t about to reward you for refusing to upgrade your nine-year-old operating system.) Leer más “Finally, a 21st Century Browser from Microsoft”

Why Companies Should Insist that Employees Take Naps

The problem is that most corporate cultures remain addicted to the draining ethic of more, bigger, faster. Rest, by this paradigm, is for slackers. Until your employer sees through that myth, consider these tips to take matters into your own hands:

* Schedule a regular time for your nap — between 1 and 3 p.m. is ideal — to increase the likelihood that you’ll take it.
* If you have your own office, create a cheeky sign for your door to set expectations others. As in: “Short nap in process to insure high afternoon productivity.”
* If you work in a cubicle, see if you can find a quiet space for your nap, even if it means leaving the building and taking your nap on a park bench, at a Starbucks or in a local library.
* Turn off your technology and set an alarm for 20 or 30 minutes.
* Close your eyes (obviously) but don’t try too hard to fall asleep. Instead, breathe in through your nose to a count of three, and out through your mouth to a count of six. Even if you don’t fall asleep, this way of breathing will insure you’ll get a rejuvenating rest.


by Tony Schwartz | //blogs.hbr.org

Good luck, right?

But here’s the reality: naps are a powerful source of competitive advantage. The recent evidence is overwhelming: naps are not just physically restorative, but also improve perceptual skills, motor skills, reaction time and alertness.

I experienced the power of naps myself when I was writing my new book, The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working.
I wrote at home, in the mornings, in three separate, highly focused 90 minute sessions. By the time I finished the last one, I was usually exhausted — physically, mentally and emotionally. I ate lunch and then took a 20 to 30 minute nap on a Barcalounger chair, which I bought just for that purpose.

When I awoke, I felt incredibly rejuvenated. Where I might otherwise have dragged myself through the afternoon, I was able to focus effectively on work other than writing until 7 pm or so, without feeling fatigued.

When Sara Mednick, a former Harvard researcher, gave her subjects a memory challenge, she allowed half of them to take a 60 to 90 minute nap, the nappers dramatically outperformed the non-nappers. In another study, Mednick had subjects practice a visual task at four intervals over the course of a day. Those who took a 30 minute nap after the second session sustained their performance all day long. Those who didn’t nap performed increasingly poorly as the day wore on. Leer más “Why Companies Should Insist that Employees Take Naps”

10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups

I’ve been involved in a couple of start ups over the last couple of years (Simply Zesty being one) and in both those start ups due to having very limited marketing budgets social media has been the main form of our marketing activities. This is the same for nearly all starts ups these days, social media is often the first port of call as it is cheap (often seen as free), accessible and fairly easy for founders and small teams to embrace. It’s a fairly logical step to start promoting your start up through social media because most entrepreneurs will have a decent personal network anyway so getting the message out to them is a next logical step. I wanted to share 10 of the top tips that I have picked up about using social media for start up businesses…
You Have Incredible Freedom

Many large organizations are crippled these days because getting one Facebook update, a tweet or blog post has to pass through several departments before getting sign off from legal. The beauty of being a start up is that you don’t face these challenges. Whatever you feel like saying you can pretty much just say, You can give people sneak access to products, share interesting facts about your company, do short videos or talk to your customers in the way you see fit. As a start up you have the incredible luxury of being able to push your message out and engage in the way you see fit with very few limitations. Embrace that freedom and share useful information that big competitors can’t.
It Won’t Be A 3 Month Quick Win

I’d always urge start ups to take a long term view on social media. Chances are you won’t get much out of it in the first 3 months. Nobody will read your blog, your Facebook page will have a few friends and family as fans and it’ll feel as if you are talking to yourself on Twitter. Building a network takes a lot of time. It’s only after a year or two of networking online and building relationships that you start to see the real value. Most start ups and businesses jump in to social media thinking it will solve all their problems only to be disappointed by the results and leave. The one piece of advice I would have here is to really stick at it because it will work in the long run but it takes time and patience.
Social Media Won’t Help Your Traffic That Much

Screen shot 2010 09 21 at 11.55.28 10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups Too many start ups I see use social media purely as a function to drive traffic to their website. Special offers, discount deals, pointing to blog posts with awards or just coming in with the hard sell will never get you anywhere. You need to find an angle. I love small start ups that share stats for example or give me a glimpse behind the scenes of what they are building. I like to know about the personalities behind the company. I won’t click on a Facebook update where you try to sell me something but if you show me a picture of you and the team drinking beers after a hard week chances are I might interact with that content. For all the talk of social search and Twitter driving traffic it is still very much about search engines if it is traffic you are after, chances are 70-80% of your traffic will come through search engines with tiny amounts coming through social media.
Ask Yourself Will It Actually Drive Sales?

Business is fairly straight forward…you need to bring more money in than you have going out. If you are going to be spending money or time on social media then you need to ask yourself the hard question of is it actually going to lead to sales. This may seem confusing given that I say not to come across with the hard sell in the last point but at the same time you can’t be doing social media for the good of your health. If you have set out to market yourself using social media then you need to set some goals. Will the fact that you provide outstanding customer service via Twitter keep your customers loyal and mean they keep coming back to you? Can you give away lots of information that is useful to your customers via a blog so as they keep coming back and eventually buy your premium services or products. I’d have very clear established goals as to what you want to achieve from your social media activity as a start up and I would plan for them over a long period of time.
Don’t Get In To Thinking Social Media Is Work

Screen shot 2010 09 21 at 12.00.06 10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups I cringe at the amount of time I see some people involved in startups on Twitter every day. I was guilty of it myself in the early days but it’s important to remember that twitter is not work. Sure you can use it in some of the ways above to get a little bit of leverage for your business but sitting on there all day reading links and talking to people is not actually working. I know it sounds very obvious but too many people lose sight of that and get caught up in social media. It is as it’s name suggests a very social activity and can drag you in but I really see no need for most start ups to be checking Twitter more than a couple of times a day.Just like the pot about your friends and family above there can be a lot of backslapping on Twitter and false praise around you start up so make sure not to get dragged in while having your ego inflated while actually forgetting about the important part of running your business and increasing sales.
Compliment With Traditional Marketing

Social media is great because it doesn’t cost much more than your time. Having said that I don’t think it can service all your marketing needs. I’ve seen a lot of start ups be scared to invest money in traditional marketing. When I say traditional marketing it could be print ads, TV, direct marketing, mail shots, radio etc etc. It can seem daunting to spend a few thousand on marketing out of an already small budget and many instead focus on trying to get free PR or using free tools but I’d urge start ups to spend a little more on traditional marketing as well. The biggest most successful businesses in the world all have huge marketing budgets, Their products don’t sell themselves so how would your start up start selling immediately without a little marketing. There are a huge amount of start ups that have failed even though they have had spectacular products simply because they have not been able to get the word out and market them correctly.


Author of 10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups

by Niall Harbison in business | //simplyzesty.com

Screen shot 2010 09 21 at 11.52.59 10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups I’ve been involved in a couple of start ups over the last couple of years (Simply Zesty being one) and in both those start ups due to having very limited marketing budgets social media has been the main form of our marketing activities. This is the same for nearly all starts ups these days, social media is often the first port of call as it is cheap (often seen as free), accessible and fairly easy for founders and small teams to embrace. It’s a fairly logical step to start promoting your start up through social media because most entrepreneurs will have a decent personal network anyway so getting the message out to them is a next logical step. I wanted to share 10 of the top tips that I have picked up about using social media for start up businesses…

You Have Incredible Freedom

Many large organizations are crippled these days because getting one Facebook update, a tweet or blog post has to pass through several departments before getting sign off from legal. The beauty of being a start up is that you don’t face these challenges. Whatever you feel like saying you can pretty much just say, You can give people sneak access to products, share interesting facts about your company, do short videos or talk to your customers in the way you see fit. As a start up you have the incredible luxury of being able to push your message out and engage in the way you see fit with very few limitations. Embrace that freedom and share useful information that big competitors can’t.

It Won’t Be A 3 Month Quick Win

I’d always urge start ups to take a long term view on social media. Chances are you won’t get much out of it in the first 3 months. Nobody will read your blog, your Facebook page will have a few friends and family as fans and it’ll feel as if you are talking to yourself on Twitter. Building a network takes a lot of time. It’s only after a year or two of networking online and building relationships that you start to see the real value. Most start ups and businesses jump in to social media thinking it will solve all their problems only to be disappointed by the results and leave. The one piece of advice I would have here is to really stick at it because it will work in the long run but it takes time and patience.

Social Media Won’t Help Your Traffic That Much

Screen shot 2010 09 21 at 11.55.28 10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups Too many start ups I see use social media purely as a function to drive traffic to their website. Special offers, discount deals, pointing to blog posts with awards or just coming in with the hard sell will never get you anywhere. You need to find an angle. I love small start ups that share stats for example or give me a glimpse behind the scenes of what they are building. I like to know about the personalities behind the company. I won’t click on a Facebook update where you try to sell me something but if you show me a picture of you and the team drinking beers after a hard week chances are I might interact with that content. For all the talk of social search and Twitter driving traffic it is still very much about search engines if it is traffic you are after, chances are 70-80% of your traffic will come through search engines with tiny amounts coming through social media. Leer más “10 Social Media Tips And Pointers For Start Ups”

Can Neuromarketing Research Increase Sales?

By monitoring brainwave activity across the full brain as subjects viewed the covers, and using eye-tracking technology to identify which specific parts of the cover they were looking at, NeuroFocus was able to measure their immediate, subconscious reaction to the designs.

While all three tested cover designs performed well in the research, the specific design that ranked highest in terms of overall neurological effectiveness scored exceptionally well in emotional engagement—one of NeuroFocus’ primary NeuroMetrics, the others being attention and memory retention (cover design 1 below was the winner). From those primary NeuroMetrics, NeuroFocus derives measures of purchase intent, novelty, and awareness.


Dr. A. K. Pradeep, Chief Executive Officer of NeuroFocus

Every new product launch, ad campaign or package design takes significant research, time and resources to ensure success, but not every launch is successful. Suffice it to say that guess work plays a part to determine: Will it grab attention? Will it be memorable? Will it engage emotionally? And most importantly, will it drive purchase intent?

Taking the guess work out of the equation prior to launch is a marketer’s dream, which is now a definable reality with quantifiable results. Just recently the notion was put to the test to see if neuroscience could be used to help a magazine sell more copies. And the results were enlightening. Leer más “Can Neuromarketing Research Increase Sales?”

Global Health & Beauty Trends

Region Round-Up
In almost all Latin American countries included in this survey, sales for personal care products reported volume increases during the latest rolling year ending June 2010 versus year ago: Chile +7.2%, Argentina +4.7%, Brazil +3.4%, Mexico +3.4% and Colombia +3.3%. Only Venezuela showed a negative trend, declining 2.5%.

In the U.S., dollar growth for the health and beauty department for the year ending July 2010 is flat (0.3%) and units have declined 2% as the economy is driving consumers to make tradeoffs and buy less. However, sales in the June and July 2010 period are improving as retailers are raising prices to enhance margins. In Canada, rising prices have fueled an increase in health and beauty (excluding baby and OTC) dollar sales of 3.2%, which outpaced the total market (+2.6%) while units were flat.

In Asia, consumers started to switch back into purchasing personal care, healthy and more premium products in the second half of 2009. This trend is expected to continue with the improving consumer confidence in the region.

The never-ending quest for beauty and perfection bodes well for the H&B sector. In countries that have emerged from the recession with vigor, the sector is likely to thrive. Meanwhile, in those regions where the recovery is still shaky—or in doubt altogether—health and beauty product manufacturers and retailers need to know exactly what’s important to those consumers: value for money and high quality products that enable them to look good, despite life’s pressures.

Note about online survey methodology
While online survey methodology allows for tremendous scale and global reach, it provides the perspectives on the habits of existing Internet users, not total populations. Where noted, the Nielsen Global Online Survey data is supplemented with consumption data by market.


Beauty on a Budget
With consumers around the world cutting back on discretionary expenses during the recession, Nielsen probed consumers’ attitudes towards health and beauty (H&B) products—where they purchased them and what factors went into their buying decisions—as part of its Global Online Survey of more than 27,000 people across 55 countries in the first quarter of 2010. And while views and habits differ by region, there’s one thing in common: people continue to place importance on looking good and feeling their best.

Universal Appeal
Virtually all online survey respondents in Latin America (96%) and Asia Pacific (92%) said they purchased H&B products, along with 90% of people around the world who made up the global average. But what prompts consumers to stock their cabinets with make-up, fragrances and personal care items?

For 44% of global respondents, it was the lure of the product’s promise. A pragmatic 69% of respondents said they were influenced by price, while 58% said they bought as a result of a personal recommendation. Magazine articles, Internet buzz and traditional ads all factored into the purchase equation as well. Leer más “Global Health & Beauty Trends”

Los bloggers pueden influir en las ventas de una marca

forma de encuesta, acerca de la inversión publicitaria en blogs, con dos apartados diferentes en los que medir la opinión de anunciantes, por una parte, y de bloggers y redes de blogs, por otra. Y hoy, tras 3 meses de estudio (de Octubre a Diciembre de 2009) están ya disponibles los resultados para los participantes y empresa que han colaborado activamente, como Medios y Redes.

Los resultados ofrecen una visión interesante, en cualquier caso digna de análisis, acerca del mercado publicitario y los blogs. Veamos algunos datos …

* Las respuestas de los anunciantes representan 1 millón de euros de inversión de publicidad en blogs.
* Las respuestas de bloggers representan 20 millones de visitas mensuales en sus blogs.

1. El 44% de los anunciantes piensan que los bloggers tienen una influencia alta o muy alta para sus marcas y pueden influir en sus ventas.
2. Hay un 29% de anunciantes que no consideran necesario incluir blogs en sus campañas.
3. Hay un 22% de anunciantes que piensan que los bloggers no influencian en las decisiones de compra.
4. Solo el 3,7% de los anunciantes siempre incluyen a bloggers en sus campañas de venta.
5. Más del 60% de los anunciantes dedican menos del 10% del presupuesto online a blogs.
6. Solo el 7,2% de los anunciantes dedica más del 50% del presupuesto online a blogs.

* Los productos que más impacto tienen en sus marcas son los publireportajes, pruebas de productos y acciones offline.
* Preguntados los bloggers por esta misma cuestión coinciden en los publireportajes pero indican que lo segundo más demandado es la compra de enlaces, algo de lo menos valorado por los anunciantes, según indicaron en sus respuestas.
* El producto más rentable para los bloggers es el patrocinio, aunque es el menos demandado.
* Los patrocinios obtienen un buen equilibrio entre demanda y rentabilidad.
* Para los bloggers el producto menos rentable son las acciones offline (en clara contraposición con el interés de los anunciantes por este tipo de acciones).
* Los bloggers solo contestan a un 37% de las notas de prensa, y es determinante que sea personalizada.
* El 79% de los bloggers muestran los aspectos positivos y negativos sobre el anunciante, aunque procuran no ser agresivos en los puntos negativos.
* El 11,8% de los bloggers reconoce omitir los puntos negativos del anunciante.

1. El principal motivo para escribir en blogs es la satisfacción personal.
2. Los anunciantes piensa que el “ego” es la primera motivación para un blogger.
3. Los bloggers han dicho que el “ego” es la última motivación.

Las diferencias entre un blogger y un periodista son: cercanía al lector, independencia y objetividad. En esto coinciden bloggers y anunciantes.

* Un 84,9% de los bloggers ponen pasión y piensan en el anunciante a la hora de realizar acciones.
* Un 37% de los anunciantes no han quedado satisfechos en las acciones realizadas por los bloggers, y un 48,2% no manifiestan tampoco mucho entusiasmo que se diga.
* Los anunciantes demandan más profesionalización en la ejecución y medición de las campañas en blogs.
* Los bloggers demandan que se valore y respete el medio blog, que se incremente la remuneración y un trato personalizado y profesional.

¿Mis opiniones? …

La mayoría de la inversión publicitaria online no va a los blogs, en parte debido a que los anunciantes no ven a los bloggers como prescriptores.

A pesar de ello demandan acciones offline en la que el blogger actúa como prescriptor y probador del producto, lo que contradice la aseveración anterior.


Publicado por Fernando Tellado

Los bloggers pueden influir en las ventas de una marca


Recientemente, como seguramente muchos de vosotros, hemos participado en el estudio que Blopies ha realizado, en forma de encuesta, acerca de la inversión publicitaria en blogs, con dos apartados diferentes en los que medir la opinión de anunciantes, por una parte, y de bloggers y redes de blogs, por otra. Y hoy, tras 3 meses de estudio (de Octubre a Diciembre de 2009) están ya disponibles los resultados para los participantes y empresa que han colaborado activamente, como Medios y Redes.

Los resultados ofrecen una visión interesante, en cualquier caso digna de análisis, acerca del mercado publicitario y los blogs. Veamos algunos datos …

  • Las respuestas de los anunciantes representan 1 millón de euros de inversión de publicidad en blogs.
  • Las respuestas de bloggers representan 20 millones de visitas mensuales en sus blogs.
  1. El 44% de los anunciantes piensan que los bloggers tienen una influencia alta o muy alta para sus marcas y pueden influir en sus ventas.
  2. Hay un 29% de anunciantes que no consideran necesario incluir blogs en sus campañas.
  3. Hay un 22% de anunciantes que piensan que los bloggers no influencian en las decisiones de compra.
  4. Solo el 3,7% de los anunciantes siempre incluyen a bloggers en sus campañas de venta.
  5. Más del 60% de los anunciantes dedican menos del 10% del presupuesto online a blogs.
  6. Solo el 7,2% de los anunciantes dedica más del 50% del presupuesto online a blogs.
  • Los productos que más impacto tienen en sus marcas son los publireportajes, pruebas de productos y acciones offline.
  • Preguntados los bloggers por esta misma cuestión coinciden en los publireportajes pero indican que lo segundo más demandado es la compra de enlaces, algo de lo menos valorado por los anunciantes, según indicaron en sus respuestas.
  • El producto más rentable para los bloggers es el patrocinio, aunque es el menos demandado.
  • Los patrocinios obtienen un buen equilibrio entre demanda y rentabilidad.
  • Para los bloggers el producto menos rentable son las acciones offline (en clara contraposición con el interés de los anunciantes por este tipo de acciones).
  • Los bloggers solo contestan a un 37% de las notas de prensa, y es determinante que sea personalizada.
  • El 79% de los bloggers muestran los aspectos positivos y negativos sobre el anunciante, aunque procuran no ser agresivos en los puntos negativos.
  • El 11,8% de los bloggers reconoce omitir los puntos negativos del anunciante.
  1. El principal motivo para escribir en blogs es la satisfacción personal.
  2. Los anunciantes piensa que el “ego” es la primera motivación para un blogger.
  3. Los bloggers han dicho que el “ego” es la última motivación.

Las diferencias entre un blogger y un periodista son: cercanía al lector, independencia y objetividad. En esto coinciden bloggers y anunciantes.

  • Un 84,9% de los bloggers ponen pasión y piensan en el anunciante a la hora de realizar acciones.
  • Un 37% de los anunciantes no han quedado satisfechos en las acciones realizadas por los bloggers, y un 48,2% no manifiestan tampoco mucho entusiasmo que se diga.
  • Los anunciantes demandan más profesionalización en la ejecución y medición de las campañas en blogs.
  • Los bloggers demandan que se valore y respete el medio blog, que se incremente la remuneración y un trato personalizado y profesional.

¿Mis opiniones? …

La mayoría de la inversión publicitaria online no va a los blogs, en parte debido a que los anunciantes no ven a los bloggers como prescriptores.

A pesar de ello demandan acciones offline en la que el blogger actúa como prescriptor y probador del producto, lo que contradice la aseveración anterior.

Los anunciantes siguen sin apostar por los blogs para el grueso de sus campañas online que, por eliminación, irán en portales y diarios generalistas. Por supuesto, esto es un error si quieren segmentar la audiencia de sus campañas, y a mejorar por ambas partes. Por el anunciante apostando por ofrecer publicidad en contenidos relacionados con sus campañas, por los bloggers ofreciendo métricas de calidad – que ya disponemos – para que el anunciante vea el valor añadido que ofrecemos. Leer más “Los bloggers pueden influir en las ventas de una marca”

9% CTR

Después del OME escribía un post llamado No me digas cuánto tráfico quieres. Dime qué tráfico quieres.

6 meses después comparando los CTRs de nuestros blogs las cifras son muy claras :

* 0,80% CTR en los blog más generalistas
* 9 % CTR en los blogs más especializados, como es el caso de Decoración de Paredes


Publicado por Ana Aldea

Después del OME  escribía un post llamado No me digas cuánto tráfico quieres. Dime qué tráfico quieres.

6 meses después comparando los CTRs de nuestros blogs las cifras son muy claras :

La segmentación y el profundo conocimiento de nuestros usuarios están haciendo que nuestros CTRs sean cada vez más altos, ya que podemos ajustar perfectamente las necesidades de nuestros clientes al perfil de nuestros lectores.

Aún así y aunque las cifras hablen por si solas los hay que siguen empeñados en cantidad en lugar de calidad. Leer más “9% CTR”