Prepare for the unexpected

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation. It’s a scenario that’s outside your direct experience, you find it hard to accept it as possible and even worse adapting to it.

Now think about it this way:

What if businesses were judged on their ability to create ‘happiness for customers’? What if all those like buttons had less to do with becoming a fan and more to do with specific actions an organization took to actually make a customer happy? What if you hired people based on how happy they’ll make your customers? What if there were a ‘customer happiness index’ dashboard (Tweetdeck) and we’d all have access to it just like the stock market? What if businesses were penalized for wasting people’s time?

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A smiley by Pumbaa, drawn using a text editor.

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation. It’s a scenario that’s outside your direct experience, you find it hard to accept it as possible and even worse adapting to it.

Now think about it this way:

What if businesses were judged on their ability to create ‘happiness for customers’? What if all those like buttons had less to do with becoming a fan and more to do with specific actions an organization took to actually make a customer happy? What if you hired people based on how happy they’ll make your customers? What  if there were a ‘customer happiness index’ dashboard (Tweetdeck) and we’d all have access to it just like the stock market? What if businesses were penalized for wasting people’s time?

Imagine how every business would behave. Leer más “Prepare for the unexpected”

A Guide to Choosing an Internet Based Fax Service [shortlisted the top 5 services]

Although most people have switched to email, there are those rare occasions when you have to send signed documents with your written signature and a fax just seems like an appropriate solution then.

You don’t need a dedicated fax machine any more as there are quite a few good web based services, both paid and free, that let you send and receive faxes using your computer itself without requiring any extra hardware. You don’t need a “fax modem” or even your traditional landline phone to send a fax via the computer.

How Internet Faxing Works?

Most online fax services work in a similar way. They give you a dedicated fax number and any fax message that’s sent to that number is forwarded to you as an email attachment. Alternatively, if you want to send a fax from your computer to another fax machine, you can send your document as an email attachment to the online fax service who in turn will forward it to the recipient’s fax machine.


send fax from computerAlthough most people have switched to email, there are those rare occasions when you have to send signed documents with your written signature and a fax just seems like an appropriate solution then.

You don’t need a dedicated fax machine any more as there are quite a few good web based services, both paid and free, that let you send and receive faxes using your computer itself without requiring any extra hardware. You don’t need a “fax modem” or even your traditional landline phone to send a fax via the computer.

How Internet Faxing Works?

Most online fax services work in a similar way. They give you a dedicated fax number and any fax message that’s sent to that number is forwarded to you as an email attachment. Alternatively, if you want to send a fax from your computer to another fax machine, you can send your document as an email attachment to the online fax service who in turn will forward it to the recipient’s fax machine. Leer más “A Guide to Choosing an Internet Based Fax Service [shortlisted the top 5 services]”

Why a Prospective Client Should Choose You

Creating this list should be fairly easy, if you already have a business plan then you’ll have done all of your SWOT analysis on your competition and yourself so you’ll know what your strengths are over your competitors. If you didn’t do this then don’t fret. Do some SWOT analysis research now and not only will you be able to create the list but you may also find out some interesting facts about your competitors and yourself that could help you out in the future too. You can use these strengths to create your list which should just be a snappy little headline and a small paragraph of text going into some brief detail on how you have this advantage and what benefit this has on the client.


There are thousands of other freelancers out in the wild, so why should a prospective client choose you over your competition? They aren’t to know what will happen if they do or don’t hire you and they aren’t to know how you’ll carry out their project but if they somehow did know then they would choose you, wouldn’t they?

What you could do is just tell them straight up five or ten reasons why they should hire you instead of your competition. You can set up a new page on your website or send out an email to a prospective client and give them a list of five, ten, or however many reasons you think they’ll need that will convince them that you are the freelancer they should choose for their next web project. Try and keep the list short and snappy though so it doesn’t turn out to be the length of a 4-year-old’s Christmas wish list. Leer más “Why a Prospective Client Should Choose You”

¿Qué es un tipping point? Buscar a unos pocos para llegar a muchos

¿Qué es un tipping point?

En primer lugar traduzcamos la frase. Cuando se busca en los diccionarios el equivalente en español para tipping point la frase que aparece con más frecuencia es “la gota que derramó el vaso”; la traducción, aunque gráfica y clara, se beneficia con una extensión: “el punto en el cual algo insignificante se vuelve importante”.
Gladwell lo define como “ese momento mágico en que una idea, tendencia o conducta social cruza un umbral, se vuelca y se esparce como incendio forestal”. Modas repentinas de productos, de grupos musicales, de lugares, de comidas, son todos ejemplos de epidemias impulsadas socialmente que han alcanzado su punto de derrame. ¿Pero cómo llegaron allí? ¿Esos puntos de derrame pueden ser inducidos?


En su influyente libro “The Tipping Point” publicado por primera vez en el año 2000, Malcolm Gladwell introduce al lector la idea de “epidemia social” y presenta pruebas precisas extraídas del mundo real para ilustrar cómo nace y se desparrama.

Sus teorías tuvieron eco porque desafiaban la forma en que las empresas definen a sus mercados objetivos y los métodos que emplean para armar y comunicar sus mensajes de marketing.

Este artículo resumen las ideas clave del libro.

¿Qué es un tipping point?

En primer lugar traduzcamos la frase. Cuando se busca en los diccionarios el equivalente en español para tipping point la frase que aparece con más frecuencia es “la gota que derramó el vaso”; la traducción, aunque gráfica y clara, se beneficia con una extensión: “el punto en el cual algo insignificante se vuelve importante”.
Gladwell lo define como “ese momento mágico en que una idea, tendencia o conducta social cruza un umbral, se vuelca y se esparce como incendio forestal”. Modas repentinas de productos, de grupos musicales, de lugares, de comidas, son todos ejemplos de epidemias impulsadas socialmente que han alcanzado su punto de derrame. ¿Pero cómo llegaron allí? ¿Esos puntos de derrame pueden ser inducidos?

A partir de una frondosa investigación, el autor plantea tres factores que, según él, contribuyen significativamente a que las epidemias sociales alcancen su “tipping point”:

• La ley de los pocos: Las epidemias sociales están “controladas por un puñado de personas” con fuertes conexiones sociales.
• El factor pegoteo: La idea, tendencia, o conducta social debe ser memorable para difundirse rápidamente y eficazmente.
• El poder del contexto: Cambios sutiles en el ambiente pueden hacer una gran diferencia en la forma en que actúa la gente en un contexto particular.

De los tres, la “Ley de los pocos” llama la atención y exige un análisis de cómo se relaciona con las prácticas empresariales convencionales. Se puede encontrar una relación entre esa idea y el clásico marketing dirigido a un mercado objetivo. Leer más “¿Qué es un tipping point? Buscar a unos pocos para llegar a muchos”

The Big Trend in Small Social Sites

Apple (AAPL) dove into interest-specific social media this month with the launch of Ping, a service for connecting music fans and artists. Unlike Ping, which has a ready-made feeder community of tens of millions of iTunes customers (and which surpassed 1 million users in just 48 hours), most niche network operators have to do more with less, building features into their sites to secure loyalty and interaction from users. There’s a payoff: They can charge higher ad rates. “The only way for a network to survive in a small community is to have a very high revenue per user,” says Jeff Clavier, a Silicon Valley angel investor who has backed canine site Dogster and video-gamer community Curse.

The exemplar of niche network success is myYearbook, founded in 2005 by siblings David and Catherine Cook. The site pulls in 25 million users, mostly teenagers, via dozens of games such as Blind Date, in which players attempt to match up compatible peers. “Our assumption is essentially everyone will have a Facebook account and use it to connect to friends and family,” says Geoff Cook, who joined his brother and sister soon after they founded the New Hope (Pa.) company, becoming chief executive officer. “Our users are here to meet new people.”


Niche social networks such as myYearbook and Dogster draw users and advertisers, adding up to a sizable portion of the social Web

By Douglas MacMillan
Saltwater fly-fishing pro Tony Biski recently came home with a story so good he couldn’t wait to share it. “It was a 12-foot great white shark viciously thrashing his tail and spraying us as he ran off with the fish,” wrote Biski, a resident of Chatham, Mass., in a post that grabbed the attention of dozens of other anglers on the Web. One commenter wanted to know if Biski had time to snap a photo. Another quipped: “Just in time for the 35th anniversary of Jaws.”

Biski didn’t bother posting his fish tale on Facebook, the 500 million-user site that’s the world’s biggest social network. Instead, he shared his story on GoFISHn, a community of a few thousand anglers. The site features maps that pinpoint where fish are biting, a photo gallery where members can show off their catches, and other quirks that distinguish it from a mass audience site. “We feel like we’re a moon orbiting Facebook,” says Ned Desmond, a former digital publishing executive at Time Inc. (TWX) who launched GoFISHn in December 2009. Desmond plans to create GoHUNTn and up to eight other interest-specific networks in coming years.

Facebook’s six-year rise from exclusive online hub for Ivy Leaguers to global digital directory has inspired a countertrend: niche social sites. Name an affinity, hobby, occupation, or demographic—mustache-wearing men, hamster lovers, moms, research scientists, boomers—and there’s likely to be a dedicated social network for it. While most niche networks are run by fledgling tech startups and are, almost by definition, small, they add up to a sizable portion of the social Web; in July at least 280 million people logged on to social sites other than Facebook and Twitter, according to audience tracker comScore (SCOR). Andrew Lipsman, comScore director of industry analysis, estimates the real number could be as high as 700 million, since many people use more than one social site. Leer más “The Big Trend in Small Social Sites”

7 Creativity Thoughts to Change Your Day


by Mike Brown

7 Creativity Thoughts to Change Your Day

  1. Creativity scares the s#!t out of lots of authority figures! Hand them some toilet paper and keep going!!!
  2. Creative variation is more than okay. Creative variation is wondrous!!!
  3. Explain something you’re familiar with to someone who has no idea about it. Use pictures. Or act it out. Or make it a song.
  4. Find a few moments for creative silence today – think, pray, nap to give yourself a break.
  5. Don’t email the same old memo. Do a diagram, mind map, or sketch of your points and use it instead.
  6. When known for complete unconventionality, sometimes you have to be blatantly conventional to stay truly unconventional. Surprise somebody today.
  7. Give your brain a break by thinking about something completely frivolous right this very instant.
    Leer más “7 Creativity Thoughts to Change Your Day”

More Drama, Obama

It wasn’t until the end of President Barack Obama’s first full press conference in three months that a problem became clear.

In the last question of the hour-plus session in the East Room of the White House on Friday morning, Fox News correspondent Wendell Goler asked the president about the Islamic center being constructed near Ground Zero in lower Manhattan, requesting that Obama “weigh in” on the “wisdom” of establishing a “mosque” near the site of the 9/11 attack. (Goler balanced out the question with a reference to the would-be Koran-burning pastor.) Obama delivered a heartfelt, forceful, and extensive reply. He noted that a bedrock principle of the nation is that all men and women “can practice religion freely.” If you can build a church, a synagogue, a Hindu temple on a site, he said, then you should be able to build a mosque. “We’re not at war with Islam,” he proclaimed. Referring to US soldiers, he said, with his voice rising, “I’ve got Muslims fighting in the uniform of the armed services of the United States. They’re putting their lives on the line for us…They are Americans!” His point: Should they be denied the freedom to practice their religion?


— White House photo/Pete Souza

At his press conference, the president delivered an impassioned defense of religious freedom, but failed to get worked up about the No. 1 issue: the economy.

— By David Corn

It wasn’t until the end of President Barack Obama‘s first full press conference in three months that a problem became clear.

In the last question of the hour-plus session in the East Room of the White House on Friday morning, Fox News correspondent Wendell Goler asked the president about the Islamic center being constructed near Ground Zero in lower Manhattan, requesting that Obama “weigh in” on the “wisdom” of establishing a “mosque” near the site of the 9/11 attack. (Goler balanced out the question with a reference to the would-be Koran-burning pastor.) Obama delivered a heartfelt, forceful, and extensive reply. He noted that a bedrock principle of the nation is that all men and women “can practice religion freely.” If you can build a church, a synagogue, a Hindu temple on a site, he said, then you should be able to build a mosque. “We’re not at war with Islam,” he proclaimed. Referring to US soldiers, he said, with his voice rising, “I’ve got Muslims fighting in the uniform of the armed services of the United States. They’re putting their lives on the line for us…They are Americans!” His point: Should they be denied the freedom to practice their religion? Leer más “More Drama, Obama”