The Next 5 Years in Social Media

Over the last five years, social media has evolved from a handful of communities that existed solely in a web browser to a multi-billion dollar industry that’s quickly expanding to mobile devices, driving major changes in content consumption habits and providing users with an identity and social graph that follows them across the web.

With that framework in place, the next five years are going to see even more dramatic change. Fueled by advancements in underlying technology – the wires, wireless networks and hardware that make social media possible – a world where everything is connected awaits us. The result will be both significant shifts in our everyday lives and a changing of the guard in several industries that are only now starting to feel the impact of social media.


Adam Ostrow

Social Media ImageOver the last five years, social media has evolved from a handful of communities that existed solely in a web browser to a multi-billion dollar industry that’s quickly expanding to mobile devices, driving major changes in content consumption habits and providing users with an identity and social graph that follows them across the web.

With that framework in place, the next five years are going to see even more dramatic change. Fueled by advancements in underlying technology – the wires, wireless networks and hardware that make social media possible – a world where everything is connected awaits us. The result will be both significant shifts in our everyday lives and a changing of the guard in several industries that are only now starting to feel the impact of social media. Leer más “The Next 5 Years in Social Media”

Huggies, Tumblr and… Kidnapped Babies? Why You Should Pay Attention To Your Social Media Campaigns

Huggies recently released their interesting new High Chair Critics social marketing campaign by leveraging the Tumblr microblogging service, and if their front page is anything, it’s a lesson that big brands should pay close attention to who’s running their social media campaign. The first entry on the page is a reference to “the most famous babies of all time”, but for some reason, instead of showing a picture of a cute baby model, it’s a missing person poster of Chas. A. Lindbergh, Jr,, who was kidnapped in 1932. Read on for more ways to avoid messing up your social media campaign.


Posted by Neil Vidyarthi

huggieslogo Huggies recently released their interesting new High Chair Critics social marketing campaign by leveraging the Tumblr microblogging service, and if their front page is anything, it’s a lesson that big brands should pay close attention to who’s running their social media campaign.  The first entry on the page is a reference to “the most famous babies of all time”, but for some reason, instead of showing a picture of a cute baby model, it’s a missing person poster of Chas. A. Lindbergh, Jr,, who was kidnapped in 1932.  Read on for more ways to avoid messing up your social media campaign.

The key problem here is that the posts on the site seem very scrapped together, and it’s clear that one of the various anonymous writers didn’t do the extra work to ensure that the included image was in sync with the Huggies brand. Leer más “Huggies, Tumblr and… Kidnapped Babies? Why You Should Pay Attention To Your Social Media Campaigns”

Web Impostors May Face Prison in California

Internet users pretending to be others could be prosecuted—and sued—if Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signs an “e-personation” bill

By Olga Kharif

California Web impostors beware: You may soon be breaking the law, even if you aren’t one of the perpetrators targeted by the state’s “e-personation” bill.

The measure, which is awaiting Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature, carries fines of as much as $1,000 and a year in jail for anyone who poses as another person online with malicious intent. The law, which would take effect on Jan. 1, would also allow victims to file civil suits.

People other than criminals may be affected by the legislation, Bloomberg Businessweek.com reported today. Pranksters, writers of satire, and even activists living outside the state could be subject to legal action, some lawyers say. Fake accounts in the names of celebrities and politicians abound on microblogging site Twitter and social network Facebook.


Internet users pretending to be others could be prosecuted—and sued—if Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signs an “e-personation” bill

By Olga Kharif

California Web impostors beware: You may soon be breaking the law, even if you aren’t one of the perpetrators targeted by the state’s “e-personation” bill.

The measure, which is awaiting Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature, carries fines of as much as $1,000 and a year in jail for anyone who poses as another person online with malicious intent. The law, which would take effect on Jan. 1, would also allow victims to file civil suits.

People other than criminals may be affected by the legislation, Bloomberg Businessweek.com reported today. Pranksters, writers of satire, and even activists living outside the state could be subject to legal action, some lawyers say. Fake accounts in the names of celebrities and politicians abound on microblogging site Twitter and social network Facebook.

“The law is very vague,” Aaron Simpson, a privacy lawyer and partner at firm Hunton & Williams in New York, said in an interview. “Legitimate forms of speech could be caught within its grasp. This is going to be tough for the courts to process.”

The law applies to anyone who credibly impersonates “for purposes of harming, intimidating, threatening, or defrauding another person,” according to the language of the bill, whose author is state Senator Joe Simitian, a Democrat whose district includes parts of Silicon Valley. Leer más “Web Impostors May Face Prison in California”

The internet has become a big popularity contest

To explain very simply why I believe the internet has become a popularity game, is to look at all the data and numbers that’s now publicly visible to practically anyone. You can see someone’s Twitter followers vs how many they’re following, Facebook friends, number of comments on a blog post, number of retweets, replies in a forum thread and many other metrics. And however much we like to admit that we don’t care about numbers, it can’t help but set a level of pre-judgement. If you get followed by someone with 100,000 followers and they’re only following 100, you’ll feel pretty special and the chances are you’ll give them some of your time. If you come across a blog post with 200 retweets, you’ll probably spend more time reading it than you would have otherwise, and if that seems like a constant pattern in their blog, you’ll probably subscribe. There are so many numbers out there that can’t help but have an effect on the actions we take and how much of an effort we go to engage with someone. And biased as I like to be, I don’t believe anyone that says they’re not influenced by big numbers on some level, even if it’s not the determining factor to follow, read, retweet etc..

I find this quite unnatural and still haven’t quite got used to the fact that everyone gets to basically see how popular I am on online. It seems to recycle the secondary school popularity game. As you get older popularity becomes less and less important, but with social media it brings it back again. Getting a retweet from the Mike Butchers of this world has the effect of almost validating us online and makes you realise just what a funny game it is.


Author of The internet has become a big popularity contest
by Lauren Fisher in Social Media

191190035 5d426ecd50 The internet has become a big popularity contestI’ve touched on this subject in recent posts but I thought it was time to write a dedicated post about the popularity game that’s currently going on through the internet, and more specifically social media. This post may seem negative and I just want to make it clear that I absolutely recognise all the benefits of social media – how it’s opened up communities and dialogues and provided companies with a completely new way to do business, one that’s more genuine and honest than anything that’s gone before. I really think I’m working in one of the most interesting communication channels there has ever been. But there is also a downside to social media, and that’s how it’s made us focus on popularity and numbers. And it feels quite unnatural. Leer más “The internet has become a big popularity contest”

The Look That Says Book

The vast majority of books and magazines are typeset using hyphenation and justification (written as H&J from here on in). In print, it’s everywhere: All lines of text except the last lines of paragraphs are stretched out to the same length. Flush left and flush right. Hyphens are used to break words at the end of lines to help prevent gaps in word spacing. Like this:

We hold these truths to be self-ev­i­dent, that all men are cre­at­ed e­qual, that they are en­dowed by their Cre­a­tor with cer­tain un­al­ien­a­ble Rights, that a­mong these are Life, Lib­er­ty and the pur­suit of Hap­pi­ness. That to se­cure these rights, Gov­ern­ments are in­sti­tut­ed a­mong Men, de­riv­ing their just pow­ers…


by Richard Fink

The Look That Says Book

The vast majority of books and magazines are typeset using hyphenation and justification (written as H&J from here on in). In print, it’s everywhere: All lines of text except the last lines of paragraphs are stretched out to the same length. Flush left and flush right. Hyphens are used to break words at the end of lines to help prevent gaps in word spacing. Like this:

We hold these truths to be self-ev­i­dent, that all men are cre­at­ed e­qual, that they are en­dowed by their Cre­a­tor with cer­tain un­al­ien­a­ble Rights, that a­mong these are Life, Lib­er­ty and the pur­suit of Hap­pi­ness. That to se­cure these rights, Gov­ern­ments are in­sti­tut­ed a­mong Men, de­riv­ing their just pow­ers… Leer más “The Look That Says Book”

Little Hiring Seen for Rest of Year

You’ve heard that old saw that if something quacks like a duck, walks like a duck, it’s probably a duck? Might as well apply it to the U.S. economy.

Today’s Economic Trends Index from The Conference Board declined slightly from July. It now stands at 96.7. In July it was 97.4.

Obviously, that’s not good news, though a .7 drop in an index that is up 9.4 percent in a year might be ignorable if all it did was quack. But the Index is also walking like the duck it is. For the first time since March 2009 seven of the eight components that go into the index turned negative.

The Conference Board reported the weakening indicators were: Percentage of Respondents Who Say They Find “Jobs Hard to Get”; Initial Claims for Unemployment Insurance, Percentage of Firms With Positions Not Able to Fill Right Now; Part-Time Workers for Economic Reasons; Job Openings; Industrial Production; and Real Manufacturing and Trade Sales.


You’ve heard that old saw that if something quacks like a duck, walks like a duck, it’s probably a duck? Might as well apply it to the U.S. economy.

Today’s Economic Trends Index from The Conference Board declined slightly from July. It now stands at 96.7. In July it was 97.4.

Obviously, that’s not good news, though a .7 drop in an index that is up 9.4 percent in a year might be ignorable if all it did was quack. But the Index is also walking like the duck it is. For the first time since March 2009 seven of the eight components that go into the index turned negative.

The Conference Board reported the weakening indicators were: Percentage of Respondents Who Say They Find “Jobs Hard to Get”; Initial Claims for Unemployment Insurance, Percentage of Firms With Positions Not Able to Fill Right Now; Part-Time Workers for Economic Reasons; Job Openings; Industrial Production; and Real Manufacturing and Trade Sales. Leer más “Little Hiring Seen for Rest of Year”

See What’s Hot Nearby on Facebook Places, Twitter and Yelp

Facebook Places is still virgin territory for most users, let alone developers and businesses. So how do you get the most out of a service that few people have really figured out how to use?

Geo-social aggregator Hotlist thinks that by combining data from Facebook Places, Twitter, Google Maps and Yelp, users can actually get a lot more value out of their checkins. Its app shows the popularity of nearby events and venues, whether or not your friends are there, the male-female ratio at a given spot, and recent Yelp reviews and Twitter posts for any location you might want to hit up.

It’s one of the first Facebook Places API integrations we’ve seen, and it’s doing a pretty thorough job of combining a ton of unstructured (from the user’s perspective) data into truly useful tidbits of actionable information.

For an on-the-go-oriented application, it helps to have a strong suite of mobile apps. While we’re still waiting for an Android app or a BlackBerry mobile offering, Hotlist does have an iPhone app [iTunes link] available for download now.


Jolie O’Dell

Facebook Places is still virgin territory for most users, let alone developers and businesses. So how do you get the most out of a service that few people have really figured out how to use?

Geo-social aggregator Hotlist thinks that by combining data from Facebook Places, Twitter, Google Maps and Yelp, users can actually get a lot more value out of their checkins. Its app shows the popularity of nearby events and venues, whether or not your friends are there, the male-female ratio at a given spot, and recent Yelp reviews and Twitter posts for any location you might want to hit up.

It’s one of the first Facebook Places API integrations we’ve seen, and it’s doing a pretty thorough job of combining a ton of unstructured (from the user’s perspective) data into truly useful tidbits of actionable information.

For an on-the-go-oriented application, it helps to have a strong suite of mobile apps. While we’re still waiting for an Android app or a BlackBerry mobile offering, Hotlist does have an iPhone app [iTunes link] available for download now. Leer más “See What’s Hot Nearby on Facebook Places, Twitter and Yelp”