12 Classic Movie Poster Designs


12 Classic Movie Poster Designs

Most designers don’t think all that much of movie posters, and for good reason. The few posters that aren’t Photoshop disasters tend to follow the same dull template – a series of faces placed in front of a full, spacey background. There has been a lot of commentary about the lack of creativity in movie posters recently, and it all seems to boil down to one point: posters are designed to sell, not to stand as creative feats.

Of course, there are always examples that buck the trend. Look at any indie film festival and you’ll see hundreds of posters that don’t stick to the conventional ‘must-sell’ approach. But amongst major releases, it’s rare to see anything other than the norm. Poster design has become stale, particularly when it comes to blockbuster movies.

We’ve picked out twelve posters that showcase the best of movie poster design, ignoring the clichés now common to posters and instead focusing on the movie’s personality. Unlike indie films, which often have no expectations of a large box office gross, many of these posters are from successful releases. If you want inspiration and a little reassurance that good design sometimes is financially appreciated, let these twelve classic (and modern) movie posters do the talking. Note: Please click on the posters for a larger view.

1.    Little Miss Sunshine, 2006

Little Miss Sunshine uses a fairly standard indie-style poster, but the film itself was far from the commercial flop most independent films are. Thanks to quirky design and endless positive word-of-mouth coverage, Little Miss Sunshine grossed over $100 million worldwide. Not bad for an indie movie, and certainly not bad for one that dodged conventional marketing materials design.

Several promotional posters were made for the movie’s wide release, all of which incorporated the yellow background and stylized character figures. Unlike other cult design hits such as Fargo, Little Miss Sunshine used yellow as its standard background color, highlighting the fact that it’s a comedy and eliminating the cleanliness that ultra-white poster backgrounds can create.

2.    Alien, 1979

Alien is the prototypical space horror, and its poster is one that’s been endlessly copied amongst other science fiction movies and shock horror films. The lone central alien egg figure, complete with chilling tag line and black background, set the standard for the hundreds of science fiction horrors that came out during the next decade.

But what makes Alien’s poster design so fantastic is the consistency it shares with the film. Almost all horror movies use their posters as a device to bring viewers into the cinema, often at the expense of any real consistency once they’re in the seat. Alien does things a little differently, giving potential viewers a complete picture of the movie’s style without giving away its plot. Leer más “12 Classic Movie Poster Designs”

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Why Your Website is More Valuable Than Facebook

I was shocked today to discover a pretty well-put-together restaurant in Chicago that only has a Facebook page instead of a designated website. I personally don’t like that and think it looks bad on them, what do you guys think?

Many local only businesses still forego developing a site for their business, restaurants especially. Some, having heard of social media, are now setting up profiles and marketing through social sites, but still don’t have their own website. Is this a good idea? Is a website no longer necessary? Or are these businesses making a huge mistake?

Last week I talked about how many of our social media profiles are little more than a wasteland. As part of that post I mentioned the idea your site being your home base online and your social profiles being outposts.

I wanted to take a little more time today to discuss that idea and then offer some reasons why you might forego a site in favor of Facebook (or any other popular social site) and then explain why I think having your own site is so much more important and why it’s more valuable to you than your presence on Facebook.


Steven Bradley
by Steven Bradley

If you were given a choice when first taking your “brick and mortar” business online to develop a website or set up a Page on Facebook, and you weren’t allowed to do the other which would you choose? Would you build a website and give up marketing through Facebook or would you set up a Facebook page and give up having your own website?

Think about the questions as you read through this post.

Facebook logo

Last week Clay started a thread on my small business forum that essentially asked the question above. The thread started with the following statement

I was shocked today to discover a pretty well-put-together restaurant in Chicago that only has a Facebook page instead of a designated website. I personally don’t like that and think it looks bad on them, what do you guys think?

Many local only businesses still forego developing a site for their business, restaurants especially. Some, having heard of social media, are now setting up profiles and marketing through social sites, but still don’t have their own website. Is this a good idea? Is a website no longer necessary? Or are these businesses making a huge mistake?

Last week I talked about how many of our social media profiles are little more than a wasteland. As part of that post I mentioned the idea your site being your home base online and your social profiles being outposts.

I wanted to take a little more time today to discuss that idea and then offer some reasons why you might forego a site in favor of Facebook (or any other popular social site) and then explain why I think having your own site is so much more important and why it’s more valuable to you than your presence on Facebook.

Graph showing the relationshi between home basses and outposts

The diagram above will be explained further down in this post. Leer más “Why Your Website is More Valuable Than Facebook”

Texas Attorney General Investigates Google Search

For instance, the Department of Justice has asked for more information to review Google’s proposed acquisition of ITA, the flight information company. The government will look at issues of search fairness as part of that inquiry.

The Texas attorney general has asked Google for more information on several companies, Google said. They include Foundem, a British shopping comparison site, SourceTool, a business search directory and myTriggers, which collects shopping links.

In the Google blog post, Mr. Harrison drew an association to Microsoft. He said that Microsoft funds Foundem’s backer and that its antitrust attorneys represent the other two.

Foundem is a member of the Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, a European group co-founded and sponsored by Microsoft. SourceTool and myTriggers are clients of Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, the law firm that represents Microsoft on antitrust issues.


By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Google said Friday that the Texas Attorney General, Greg Abbott, is conducting an antitrust review of its search business.

The examination involves the fairness of Google search results, a concept called search neutrality. Some companies worry Google has the power to discriminate against them by lowering their links in search results or charging higher fees for their paid search ads.

In a company blog post, Don Harrison, Google’s deputy general counsel, said that the company’s priority is to “provide the most useful, relevant search results and ads for users.”

“Given that not every Web site can be at the top of the results, or even appear on the first page of our results, it’s unsurprising that some less relevant, lower quality websites will be unhappy with their ranking,” Mr. Harrison wrote. Leer más “Texas Attorney General Investigates Google Search”

IBM at the US Open – Analyzing Every Volley, Serve and Overhead Smash

At the U.S. Open, IBM has deployed sensors to the radar guns, the umpire chairs and throughout the tennis grounds to collect data that can be analyzed and visualized.

It has partnered with the U.S. Tennis Association to provide its PointStream technology, which pull intelligence from the data around scores and match statistics. It is supposed to then present that information in real-time.


US Open Live - USOpen.org.jpgOne quote from an IBM executive stands out in the post that Chris Cameron wrote today about IBM’s augmented reality app for the U.S. Open.

Rick Singer, IBM’s Vice President of Sports Technology Partnerships said it all comes down tthe information generated with every tennis stroke, volley and serve:

“This is all about data. It’s about how you take data, aggregate it and make it simpler to use,” says Singer. “This is like having your best friend with you that knows everything about the Open right by your side because you can take all of that data and you can make better decisions.”

IBM is using the U.S. Open to demonstrate its commitment to cloud computing. Leer más “IBM at the US Open – Analyzing Every Volley, Serve and Overhead Smash”

Have a great idea? A chance to put your best “face” forward and “ping” a billionaire.

Mark Cuban. Brilliant, entrepreneurial, and in need of something.

For those unfamiliar with Mark Cuban, here’s a brief, emphasizing brief, overview of the last 10+ years of his life. Cuban, who along with Todd Wagner, started Audionet, combining their mutual interest in college basketball and webcasting. This venture grew into what would eventually become Broadcast.com, acquired by Yahoo! in 1999 for $5.9 billion in Yahoo! stock. Currently, Cuban is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks, of Landmark Theatres, and Chairman of HDNet.

Brief.

Now Mark Cuban wants to talk to you, and unfortunately, not me.

In a post on his blog, Blog Maverick, which I highly recommend following, he writes the following:

“If you develop Social Games I want to talk to you. Im looking to invest in games, developers and projects

Im looking for consumer and corporate applications. I’m not looking for knockoffs of existing games/apps. I’m also looking for physical products that have integrated social gaming components . My preference for all the above is that they run on or integrate deeply with Facebook and/or Itunes 10/Ping and all the devices they support.”

You can post them here or email me at blogmaverick@aol.com.

If I like it , I will respond. If I dont, I wont. I wont sign and NDA.”


Mark Cuban.  Brilliant, entrepreneurial, and in need of something.

For those unfamiliar with Mark Cuban, here’s a brief, emphasizing brief, overview of the last 10+ years of his life.  Cuban, who along with Todd Wagner, started Audionet, combining their mutual interest in college basketball and webcasting.  This venture grew into what would eventually become Broadcast.com, acquired by Yahoo! in 1999 for $5.9 billion in Yahoo! stock. Currently, Cuban is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks, of Landmark Theatres, and Chairman of HDNet.

Brief.

Now Mark Cuban wants to talk to you, and unfortunately, not me.

In a post on his blog, Blog Maverick, which I highly recommend following, he writes the following:

“If you develop Social Games I want to talk to you. Im looking to invest in  games,  developers and projects

Im looking for consumer and corporate applications. I’m not looking for knockoffs of existing games/apps. I’m also looking for physical products that have integrated social gaming components . My preference for all the above is that they run on or  integrate deeply  with Facebook and/or Itunes 10/Ping and all the devices they support.”

You can post them here or email me at blogmaverick@aol.com.

If I like it , I will respond. If I dont, I wont.  I wont sign and NDA.” Leer más “Have a great idea? A chance to put your best “face” forward and “ping” a billionaire.”

Las suscripciones a los periódicos online aportan sólo el 25% de los ingresos de la prensa escrita

Evans también afirma que los periódicos ya tuvieron que afrontar una situación similar anteriormente. Cuando disminuyó la circulación de prensa impresa estos medios se vieron obligados a añadir un 20% más de páginas en la última década, permitiendo que los diarios de calidad pudieran aumentar su precio un 112%. Pero engordar los periódicos ya no es una opción que pueda funcionar, afirmó Benedict Evans, señalando que las redacciones de los periódicos se han reducido considerablemente.

Aunque, según afirman Robert Andrews en Paid Content:UK y Francois Nel, de la Universidad de Central Lancashire, la estrategia de pago de The Times puede reducir sus ingresos significativamente, no significa que los elimine por completo.


Según afirman los últimos análisis, aunque los periódicos lograran trasladar todos sus lectores en versión impresa a la versión de pago online, seguirían teniendo que afrontar grandes pérdidas. Benedict Evans, de Enders Analysis, ha publicado que los ingresos anuales obtenidos por la suscripción online de TheTimes.co.uk y WSJ.com son sólo un cuarto de los obtenidos por los suscriptores británicos a la versión impresa.

Si los periódicos lograran sustituir las versiones impresas por las ediciones digitales ahorrarían un 25% de sus costes totales, pero, como afirma Evans, esto no lograría reparar la brecha debida a los bajos ingresos online. Este es el dilema al que se tienen que enfrentar las empresas a la hora de sustituir ingresos físicos por ingresos online. Y algunos editores, como el magnate Rupert Murdoch, pueden estar empezando a concebir un futuro en el que, aunque sólo sea teóricamente, las ediciones de pago, tanto en web como en las tabletas digitales, sean tan populares que se pueda considerar acabar con las imprentas. Leer más “Las suscripciones a los periódicos online aportan sólo el 25% de los ingresos de la prensa escrita”

“Si alguien quiere perder dinero, lo ideal es que venda por internet”, G. Costa (ESADE)

Así de contundente se muestra Gerard Costa, profesor de marketing de ESADE. Por lo visto, no todo el mundo cree que la red sea una panacea para todos los comerciantes, que cada vez dudan menos sobre los beneficios que proporciona internet. Costa cree que sólo empresas muy específicas pueden vender con éxito en la red. ”Vender por internet puede arruinar una pequeña tienda en seis meses”, declara el profesor.

Según Costa, las pequeñas y medianas empresas deberían utilizar las tiendas virtuales para atraer al cliente a sus tiendas físicas, ya que, de lo contrario, se produce un “descontrol de los costes”. Las tiendas virtuales han de ser un complemento que proporcione información sobre los productos, permita consultar el catálogo, genere comunidad y enseñe al consumidor otros productos que le puedan interesar.


Así de contundente se muestra Gerard Costa, profesor de marketing de ESADE. Por lo visto, no todo el mundo cree que la red sea una panacea para todos los comerciantes, que cada vez dudan menos sobre los beneficios que proporciona internet. Costa cree que sólo empresas muy específicas pueden vender con éxito en la red. ”Vender por internet puede arruinar una pequeña tienda en seis meses”, declara el profesor.

Según Costa, las pequeñas y medianas empresas deberían utilizar las tiendas virtuales para atraer al cliente a sus tiendas físicas, ya que, de lo contrario, se produce un “descontrol de los costes”. Las tiendas virtuales han de ser un complemento que proporcione información sobre los productos, permita consultar el catálogo, genere comunidad y enseñe al consumidor otros productos que le puedan interesar. Leer más ““Si alguien quiere perder dinero, lo ideal es que venda por internet”, G. Costa (ESADE)”