Vidyo: Videoconferencing’s Best Hope?

Without HP’s support, Vidyo is just another promising startup. As the world’s biggest PC maker and a prime supplier of corporate tech, HP could bring Vidyo and videoconferencing to the corporate mainstream. Analysts expect HP to use Vidyo to distinguish HP’s computers and mobile devices from products made by rivals such as Dell (DELL) and Apple. It could also help HP build up its $35 billion-a-year a consulting business by advising companies on how to use videoconferencing to lift productivity.

It’s unclear, however, whether HP will aggressively pursue this video calling market. Although it introduced its Halo system a year before Cisco unveiled its own telepresence product, HP has just 3 percent of the videoconferencing market, compared with 45 percent for Cisco, estimates Davis. “Vidyo could be an important weapon for HP, but it all depends on what they do with it,” says Chuck House, a retired HP executive who now advises Vidyo’s board. He points out that Cisco CEO John T. Chambers promotes videoconferencing every chance he gets, “but you never hear HP say anything about it. It’s an afterthought.”

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A New Jersey startup gets pricey and basic systems communicating—and could be videoconferencing’s ticket to the mainstream

By Peter Burrows

At most companies, videoconferencing has yet to evolve from a technological parlor trick into an everyday utility like e-mail. One reason is there’s no cheap and easy way to make it available on all the devices people use. Even companies that opt for top-of-the-line equipment from Cisco Systems (CSCO) or Hewlett-Packard (HPQ)often pay nearly $1 million to upgrade the underlying corporate network, says IDC analyst Jonathan Edwards.

That’s why tech industry veterans are keeping a close eye on Vidyo, whose technology will soon be sold by HP. The 120-person startup, based in Hackensack, N.J., makes software it says can run on almost any device that connects to the Net—and adjusts whether that’s a high-speed link in the boardroom or a cell connection from the 18th hole. While most companies buy a few high-end videoconferencing systems for executives, “We want to connect millions of people,” says Vidyo Chief Executive Ofer Shapiro.

The aim is to bridge the gap between traditional systems costing up to $300,000 for a just-like-being-there telepresence room and cheap but low-quality PC-based services such as Skype—and in a way that lets people using all of these options participate in calls together. Leer más “Vidyo: Videoconferencing’s Best Hope?”

Companies in Brief


Barnes & Noble: After Booking Losses, a Bookseller on Sale

Yielding to pressure from investors as a shift to digital books hits the bottom line, the biggest U.S. bookstore chain has put itself on the block. In May billionaire Ron Burkle, who owns 19 percent of Barnes & Noble (BKS), launched a lawsuit seeking to invalidate the bookseller’s “poison pill” defense against takeovers to boost the value of his holding; the sale could give him what he wants. Chairman Leonard Riggio, B&N’s biggest shareholder, says he may join with a group that will bid for the company. In June the chain forecast a possible loss of 40 cents a share for the current fiscal year due to a $140 million investment in its digital book unit.

—By David Rocks, Edited by James E. Ellis Leer más “Companies in Brief”

Explore the Titanic Wreck Site via Social Media [EXCLUSIVE]

A team of archaeologists, scientists and oceanographers will soon be revisiting the wreck of the Titanic for further scientific discovery and documentation. The entire process will be shared in near real-time with the world via social media.

The mission, Expedition Titanic, is meant to not only preserve the iconic ship — disintegrating two and half miles beneath the sea — but also to expose the wreck site to the public for the first time.

It’s a scientific undertaking like no other, but one with a very modern twist that relies heavily on social media to share the mission with the world.

The video below briefly introduces the mission behind the expedition.
The Mission: Virtually Raise the Titanic

The digital journey is the result of a partnership between RMS Titanic, Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Premier Exhibitions, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Waitt Institute. The expert dive doesn’t officially kick off until August 22, but the site is live and should help build anticipation for the upcoming deep sea trek.

The Expedition Titanic launched late last night, and those curious about the research initiative can already use the interactive flash-based site to virtually dive down to the ocean floor and explore the ship’s remains for themselves.

At its core, Expedition Titanic is designed to give those at home a lens through which to see what the experts are seeing. After taking the 3D-animated journey down to the wreck site, visitors can explore the wreck site map, check out video and images that will be shared from the dive in near real time, and control a close-up 360 degree view of the equipment used for mapping the Titanic’s final resting place. There’s also informational tidbits scattered throughout the site, messages from team members and eventually a 3D model of the ship.

Chris Greco, vice president of digital at Premier Exhibitions, explains that Expedition Titanic aims to “capture the entire wreck site,” something that has never been done before. “We hope to create a site survey and archaeological map, which will help us create an archeological plan, and that would let us treat the Titanic the way you would the Pyramids or any of the wonders of the world,” he says.


Jennifer Van Grove

A team of archaeologists, scientists and oceanographers will soon be revisiting the wreck of the Titanic for further scientific discovery and documentation. The entire process will be shared in near real-time with the world via social media.

The mission, Expedition Titanic, is meant to not only preserve the iconic ship — disintegrating two and half miles beneath the sea — but also to expose the wreck site to the public for the first time.

It’s a scientific undertaking like no other, but one with a very modern twist that relies heavily on social media to share the mission with the world.

The video below briefly introduces the mission behind the expedition.


The Mission: Virtually Raise the Titanic


The digital journey is the result of a partnership between RMS Titanic, Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Premier Exhibitions, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Waitt Institute. The expert dive doesn’t officially kick off until August 22, but the site is live and should help build anticipation for the upcoming deep sea trek.

The Expedition Titanic launched late last night, and those curious about the research initiative can already use the interactive flash-based site to virtually dive down to the ocean floor and explore the ship’s remains for themselves.

At its core, Expedition Titanic is designed to give those at home a lens through which to see what the experts are seeing. After taking the 3D-animated journey down to the wreck site, visitors can explore the wreck site map, check out video and images that will be shared from the dive in near real time, and control a close-up 360 degree view of the equipment used for mapping the Titanic’s final resting place. There’s also informational tidbits scattered throughout the site, messages from team members and eventually a 3D model of the ship.

Chris Greco, vice president of digital at Premier Exhibitions, explains that Expedition Titanic aims to “capture the entire wreck site,” something that has never been done before. “We hope to create a site survey and archaeological map, which will help us create an archeological plan, and that would let us treat the Titanic the way you would the Pyramids or any of the wonders of the world,” he says. Leer más “Explore the Titanic Wreck Site via Social Media [EXCLUSIVE]”

The Case of the Stolen Laptop: How to Encrypt, and Why

There’s an investigator I know, top of her profession, who once put her laptop in the trunk of a cab. By the time she reached her hotel, the laptop was gone. This happens thousands of times a year at airports, train stations, libraries and coffee shops. Sometimes the thief wants your hardware. Sometimes your data turns out to be more valuable, or its loss more damaging. (It’s pathetically easy to find examples.) And sometimes the victim is not a matter of chance.

In this case our investigator was onto something hot. She was closing in on a high-profile scandal that disturbed the interests of powerful and resourceful people. Maybe her bag was jacked by a petty thief, but Occam’s Razor pointed another way. She had to assume her targets now knew anything they could glean from her computer. I found her to be oddly undisturbed by this. She said she had followed the first rule of prudence, which is not to write anything down — especially in digital form — that you really, really need to keep secret. But I thought she was nuts to believe she lost nothing sensitive. It is astonishing what current forensic tools can learn from your computer.


By Barton Gellman

The Case of the Stolen Laptop: How to Encrypt, and Why

There’s an investigator I know, top of her profession, who once put her laptop in the trunk of a cab. By the time she reached her hotel, the laptop was gone. This happens thousands of times a year at airports, train stations, libraries and coffee shops. Sometimes the thief wants your hardware. Sometimes your data turns out to be more valuable, or its loss more damaging. (It’s pathetically easy to find examples.) And sometimes the victim is not a matter of chance.

In this case our investigator was onto something hot. She was closing in on a high-profile scandal that disturbed the interests of powerful and resourceful people. Maybe her bag was jacked by a petty thief, but Occam’s Razor pointed another way. She had to assume her targets now knew anything they could glean from her computer. I found her to be oddly undisturbed by this. She said she had followed the first rule of prudence, which is not to write anything down — especially in digital form — that you really, really need to keep secret. But I thought she was nuts to believe she lost nothing sensitive. It is astonishing what current forensic tools can learn from your computer. Leer más “The Case of the Stolen Laptop: How to Encrypt, and Why”

Innovation Dilemma: Open Up or Shut Up?


Science icon from Nuvola icon theme for KDE 3.x.
Image via Wikipedia

In a recent post, Where Big Companies Fail on Innovation, I argue that big companies fail to communicate well on their corporate innovation capabilities.

I believe this is a problem as most industries have begun adopting open innovation practices in which a key goal is to become the preferred partner of choice. This requires a significant higher visibility for corporate innovation departments.

Michael Fruhling and Kevin McFarthing contributed with comments in which they argue that companies can still do well with innovation – even open innovation – without communicating much about their efforts. Leer más “Innovation Dilemma: Open Up or Shut Up?”

RENAULT MEGANE / THE MEGANE EXPERIMENT

Renault spreads a bit of French joy to the North of England

In a mission to bring joie de vivre to the town of Gisburn, Lancashire, in the North of England. Renault has teamed up with a French man called Claude, Publicis, Publicis Modem and Jam, London.

YouTube video!

According to the story Gisburn has no Méganes, and therefore not so much joie de vivre.Our French friend Claude wants to find out if a car can change a village, and makes the trip from his stylish hometown of Menton on the Côte d’Azur to explain to the Gisburn locals that towns with more Mégane’s have higher fertility rates, and more of this ‘joie de vivre’ stuff. After meeting and greeting the people of the village, disrupting cattle markets and pubs along the way, Claude hosts the Festival de Joie on local playing fields, which despite very English weather still attracted around 300 bemused faces.


Renault spreads a bit of French joy to the North of England

In a mission to bring joie de vivre to the town of Gisburn, Lancashire, in the North of England. Renault has teamed up with a French man called Claude, Publicis, Publicis Modem and Jam, London.

According to the story Gisburn has no Méganes, and therefore not so much joie de vivre.Our French friend Claude wants to find out if a car can change a village, and makes the trip from his stylish hometown of Menton on the Côte d’Azur to explain to the Gisburn locals that towns with more Mégane’s have higher fertility rates, and more of this ‘joie de vivre’ stuff. After meeting and greeting the people of the village, disrupting cattle markets and pubs along the way, Claude hosts the Festival de Joie on local playing fields, which despite very English weather still attracted around 300 bemused faces.