Facebook’s Open Graph and Like Button are Going Mobile

Facebook’s Open Graph, the platform that extends and spreads Facebook’s social network throughout the web, is going mobile, according to Facebook’s Head of Mobile Products Eric Tseng.

At the MobileBeat 2010 conference in San Francisco, Tseng said that Facebook (Facebook) “really sees mobile as the future,” and that we can expect to see Facebook’s “Like” buttons in mobile applications soon.

Tseng used geolocation as an example to illustrate the power of the mobile Open Graph. If you were to walk near a coffee shop and get a location-aware notification that there’s a happy hour going on there, you’ll probably be even more inclined to visit it if the notification comes bundled with recommendations from your Facebook friends…

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Stan Schroeder

Facebook LogoFacebook’s Open Graph, the platform that extends and spreads Facebook’s social network throughout the web, is going mobile, according to Facebook’s Head of Mobile Products Eric Tseng.

At the MobileBeat 2010 conference in San Francisco, Tseng said that Facebook (Facebook) “really sees mobile as the future,” and that we can expect to see Facebook’s “Like” buttons in mobile applications soon.

Tseng used geolocation as an example to illustrate the power of the mobile Open Graph. If you were to walk near a coffee shop and get a location-aware notification that there’s a happy hour going on there, you’ll probably be even more inclined to visit it if the notification comes bundled with recommendations from your Facebook friends… Leer más “Facebook’s Open Graph and Like Button are Going Mobile”

Safari’s first Twitter app, Ostrich, puts slick and simple into the forefront.

We all have our favorite clients, but for some of us Twitter’s usefulness comes down to accessability. In this regard, it’s going to be hard to beat Ostrich.

As @Zee puts it “it’s slick, but basic”, and that is likely the biggest selling point. Ostrich is the first built-in Twitter client that is designed solely to give you Twitter access no matter where you’re surfing on Safari.

Yes, it is only for Safari.

I loaded up Ostrich from the site, and gave it some time to load my Tweets. Once loaded, you just click on the Ostrich head and your Twitter feed will pull up. You can add new tweets by clicking on the +, and there’s a button to attach a link to whatever page you’re on. Of course you can also reply and retweet within Ostrich as well.


We all have our favorite clients, but for some of us Twitter’s usefulness comes down to accessability.  In this regard, it’s going to be hard to beat Ostrich.

As @Zee puts it “it’s slick, but basic”, and that is likely the biggest selling point.  Ostrich is the first built-in Twitter client that is designed solely to give you Twitter access no matter where you’re surfing on Safari.

Yes, it is only for Safari.

I loaded up Ostrich from the site, and gave it some time to load my Tweets.  Once loaded, you just click on the Ostrich head and your Twitter feed will pull up.  You can add new tweets by clicking on the +, and there’s a button to attach a link to whatever page you’re on.  Of course you can also reply and retweet within Ostrich as well. Leer más “Safari’s first Twitter app, Ostrich, puts slick and simple into the forefront.”

Don’t buy Apple’s iPhone 4, Consumer Reports warns

Magazine’s conclusion is ‘black eye’ for Apple, says analyst
By Gregg Keizer

Computerworld – Consumer Reports magazine today said it won’t recommend Apple’s iPhone 4 because of major reception issues when users touch the external antenna.

One analyst called the publication’s conclusion a “black eye” for Apple.

“When your finger or hand touches a spot on the phone’s lower left side — an easy thing, especially for lefties — the signal can significantly degrade enough to cause you to lose your connection altogether if you’re in an area with a weak signal,” said Mike Gikas, the publication’s senior electronics editor in a blog post Monday.

Consumer Reports non-recommendation — “Due to this problem, we can’t recommend the iPhone 4,” Gikas said — is the latest in a series of knocks against the iPhone 4 over reception problems.


Apple's iPhone 4

Magazine’s conclusion is ‘black eye’ for Apple, says analyst

By Gregg Keizer

Computerworld – Consumer Reports magazine today said it won’t recommend Apple’s iPhone 4 because of major reception issues when users touch the external antenna.

One analyst called the publication’s conclusion a “black eye” for Apple.

“When your finger or hand touches a spot on the phone’s lower left side — an easy thing, especially for lefties — the signal can significantly degrade enough to cause you to lose your connection altogether if you’re in an area with a weak signal,” said Mike Gikas, the publication’s senior electronics editor in a blog post Monday.

Consumer Reports non-recommendation — “Due to this problem, we can’t recommend the iPhone 4,” Gikas said — is the latest in a series of knocks against the iPhone 4 over reception problems.