From Sports Clichés to Social Media Lessons

by Ian Sohn

Between The World Cup and LeBronapalooza I’ve had sports on the brain for the last few weeks.

As I followed the media coverage I thought I might be able to take some of the tired clichés and re-fashion them into lessons for social media practitioners.

My original plan was to post 10 items, but I could only muster up nine. Anyone care to help with the 10th?

1. Singles and doubles start rallies. Not every social media program has to be a round-tripper. In fact starting small – listen, test and learn – can lead to bigger and better things down the road. The groundwork gives you permission to swing for the fences.
2. The “12th man” is your greatest advantage. Give your fans something to cheer about – something exclusive, entertaining, educational or utilitarian.
3. Don’t hold your stars down.Let your most popular personalities represent you in social media. Do you have a rockstar product manager? A charismatic executive? Give them the tools, forum and role to be a voice of your organization.
4. Watch your pitch count. Don’t over or under do it. Follow a structured conversation management approach to make sure you’re pushing the right content with the right cadence, but not burning out your audience.
5. Coaching is important, but execution is everything. The most effective way to teach people how to use social media is by getting in the trenches with them; and showing them how it’s done by making them actually do it…


by Ian Sohn

Between The World Cup and LeBronapalooza I’ve had sports on the brain for the last few weeks.

As I followed the media coverage I thought I might be able to take some of the tired clichés and re-fashion them into lessons for social media practitioners.

My original plan was to post 10 items, but I could only muster up nine.  Anyone care to help with the 10th?

  1. Singles and doubles start rallies. Not every social media program has to be a round-tripper.  In fact starting small – listen, test and learn – can lead to bigger and better things down the road.  The groundwork gives you permission to swing for the fences.
  2. The “12th man” is your greatest advantage. Give your fans something to cheer about – something exclusive, entertaining, educational or utilitarian.
  3. Don’t hold your stars down.Let your most popular personalities represent you in social media.  Do you have a rockstar product manager?  A charismatic executive?  Give them the tools, forum and role to be a voice of your organization.
  4. Watch your pitch count. Don’t over or under do it.  Follow a structured conversation management approach to make sure you’re pushing the right content with the right cadence, but not burning out your audience.
  5. Coaching is important, but execution is everything.  The most effective way to teach people how to use social media is by getting in the trenches with them; and showing them how it’s done by making them actually do it…
  6. Establish the run to open up the passing game. You’ve got to establish a listening program before you take a few shots down the field.  Otherwise you’re just guessing at the right approach.
  7. There’s no “I” in Team. Some of us are great at understanding Facebook best practices.  Others are Twitter maestros.  And still others, brilliant bloggers.  It takes a team of players with complementary skills to win big.
  8. Players make the best coaches. The only way to teach others (clients and colleagues alike) is to log hours on the field.  You have to know what it’s like to do in order to coach.
  9. Even superstars get booed sometimes. You have to be willing to take some bad social media feedback with the good.  A little thick skin never hurt anyone.

http://blog.ogilvypr.com/2010/07/from-sports-cliches-to-social-media-lessons/

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Autor: Gabriel Catalano - human being | (#IN).perfección®

Lo importante es el camino que recorremos, las metas son apenas el resultado de ese recorrido. Llegar generalmente significa volver a empezar!

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