Renault ha conseguido un pequeño descapotable biplaza “Wind”

Renault ha conseguido un pequeño descapotable biplaza que destaca por su original sistema de capota rígida que se abre/cierra en sólo 12 segundos y que ofrece la misma capacidad de maletero con el techo plegado o desplegado.

El nuevo modelo se ofrece como alternativa urbana y viajera con estas medidas: 3,83 x 1,68 x 1,38 m, y una capacidad de 270 litros en el maletero. El rey en su categoría, pero con sólo dos plazas.
El Wind empezará a comercializarse en septiembre, al igual que en el resto de Europa occidental, dos meses después de su venta en Reino Unido y Eslovenia, país éste en el que se fabrica.

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Renault ha conseguido un pequeño descapotable biplaza que destaca por su original sistema de capota rígida que se abre/cierra en sólo 12 segundos y que ofrece la misma capacidad de maletero con el techo plegado o desplegado.

El nuevo modelo se ofrece como alternativa urbana y viajera con estas medidas: 3,83 x 1,68 x 1,38 m, y una capacidad de 270 litros en el maletero. El rey en su categoría, pero con sólo dos plazas.
El Wind empezará a comercializarse en septiembre, al igual que en el resto de Europa occidental, dos meses después de su venta en Reino Unido y Eslovenia, país éste en el que se fabrica. Leer más “Renault ha conseguido un pequeño descapotable biplaza “Wind””

10 Fresh Galleries for Web Design Inspiration

Creativity needs a jumpstart at times. When you’re feeling creatively low, one of the best ways to get inspired is to admire and look at exceptional web designs. In this collection, you’ll discover some new web design galleries to check out. I hope you find at least a couple of new favorites that you’ll bookmark and visit regularly!


by Jacob Gube

10 Fresh Galleries for Web Design Inspiration

Creativity needs a jumpstart at times. When you’re feeling creatively low, one of the best ways to get inspired is to admire and look at exceptional web designs. In this collection, you’ll discover some new web design galleries to check out. I hope you find at least a couple of new favorites that you’ll bookmark and visit regularly!

1. Wireframe Showcase

Wireframe Showcase

Wireframe Showcase lets you peek under the hood of a web design. Instead of focusing just on the finished layout — which is how most web design galleries work — featured designs on the site have a discussion by the web designer and screenshots of preliminary sketches, prototypes, and wireframes, giving you insight on their production process.

2. Heart Directed

Heart Directed

A recently popular design trend is blogs that publish custom-designed blog posts. Heart Directed, a web project by Design Informer, highlights some masterfully crafted and visually stunning blog posts. Leer más “10 Fresh Galleries for Web Design Inspiration”

Download Our Latest Report For Free: The Future of the Cloud

We’re delighted to announce ReadWriteWeb’s fourth premium report, The Future of the Cloud: Cloud Platform APIs are the Business of Cloud Computing. Thanks to the generosity of our partners VMWare and Intel, we’re providing this report at no cost to you.

The Future of the Cloud highlights cloud computing’s impact on IT organizations, and explores both its disruptive nature and the new markets and opportunities it’s creating. The first phase of the cloud was about developing the foundation for the services it provides. Now that the fundamentals are in place, companies are using them to become an essential part of the cloud’s value chain.


We’re delighted to announce ReadWriteWeb‘s fourth premium report, The Future of the Cloud: Cloud Platform APIs are the Business of Cloud Computing. Thanks to the generosity of our partners VMWare and Intel, we’re providing this report at no cost to you.The Future of the Cloud highlights cloud computing’s impact on IT organizations, and explores both its disruptive nature and the new markets and opportunities it’s creating. The first phase of the cloud was about developing the foundation for the services it provides. Now that the fundamentals are in place, companies are using them to become an essential part of the cloud’s value chain. Leer más “Download Our Latest Report For Free: The Future of the Cloud”

Customer Service on Twitter, Should You do it?

The bar for customer service is admittedly still not very high across the board. In many, if not most cases, it’s because of business issues that keep an organization from focusing on the product or service — hence the need for extra support.

Many organizations are still looking at customer service as a cost center, when they could be taking a different view, especially with social media. The best way to communicate about something being better is by letting people see satisfied customers.


Brand441The bar for customer service is admittedly still not very high across the board. In many, if not most cases, it’s because of business issues that keep an organization from focusing on the product or service — hence the need for extra support.

Many organizations are still looking at customer service as a cost center, when they could be taking a different view, especially with social media. The best way to communicate about something being better is by letting people see satisfied customers. Leer más “Customer Service on Twitter, Should You do it?”

Guest post: Can a startup think global without boarding a plane?

by Guest Author

This is a guest post by Richard Leyland, an entrepreneur and writer with a particular focus on the future of work. Richard is also the founder of WorkSnug, the location-based service for mobile workers.

Last year I founded a tech company in the augmented reality space. We’re doing pretty well. What began as me, an idea and a laptop is now a company with five people, plus a small army of freelancers and contractors. From roots in London we’ve now launched in sixteen cities across nine countries and two continents. We can reasonably claim to be global.

But we don’t fly. More than that, our founding principles make a public commitment that we won’t fly in the course of our business.


This is a guest post by Richard Leyland, an entrepreneur and writer with a particular focus on the future of work. Richard is also the founder of WorkSnug, the location-based service for mobile workers.

Last year I founded a tech company in the augmented reality space. We’re doing pretty well. What began as me, an idea and a laptop is now a company with five people, plus a small army of freelancers and contractors. From roots in London we’ve now launched in sixteen cities across nine countries and two continents. We can reasonably claim to be global.

But we don’t fly. More than that, our founding principles make a public commitment that we won’t fly in the course of our business. Leer más “Guest post: Can a startup think global without boarding a plane?”

Becoming An Entrepreneur: Factors to consider when launching an Internet-based startup business

Bob Kemper

EDITOR’S NOTE: Historically, at the center of the trough in an economic recession, extended unemployment serves as a catalyst for starting small businesses. Entrepreneurship can be very appealing, with dollar signs popping in your eyes as you think of the Google/Facebook/Your Next Company Here billionaires.

Yet while you might be highly skilled at your own profession, being the boss means so much more than knowing how to do what you do well. From my own (extremely minor) foray(s) into entrepreneurship, let me assure you the hardest part is the required intense focus on things you really don’t care about.

When considering starting a business you’re likely already focused on the critical micro elements (your skillsets, potential customers you may know, a snazzy logo) and don’t have the resources for an on-staff Economist/Researcher. So below are a few things this Editor really doesn’t care about, but you should if you’re thinking about making that leap.

Director of Sciences Bob Kemper has been kind enough to share some very high level, yet still very important considerations…

I’ve recently been researching the current macroeconomic and societal environment, and here are a few considerations to keep in mind if you are planning on launching an Internet-oriented business, along with key questions to ask yourself.


Bob Kemper

EDITOR’S NOTE: Historically, at the center of the trough in an economic recession, extended unemployment serves as a catalyst for starting small businesses. Entrepreneurship can be very appealing, with dollar signs popping in your eyes as you think of the Google/Facebook/Your Next Company Here billionaires.

Yet while you might be highly skilled at your own profession, being the boss means so much more than knowing how to do what you do well. From my own (extremely minor) foray(s) into entrepreneurship, let me assure you the hardest part is the required intense focus on things you really don’t care about.

When considering starting a business you’re likely already focused on the critical micro elements (your skillsets, potential customers you may know, a snazzy logo) and don’t have the resources for an on-staff Economist/Researcher. So below are a few things this Editor really doesn’t care about, but you should if you’re thinking about making that leap.

Director of Sciences Bob Kemper has been kind enough to share some very high level, yet still very important considerations…

I’ve recently been researching the current macroeconomic and societal environment, and here are a few considerations to keep in mind if you are planning on launching an Internet-oriented business, along with key questions to ask yourself. Leer más “Becoming An Entrepreneur: Factors to consider when launching an Internet-based startup business”

Usability makes business sense

By Isabelle Chan, ZDNet Asia

Good usability transcends age, geography and culture, says usability expert Jakob Nielsen.

It doesn’t matter if a Web site targets an Internet surfer who is 20 and not 50 years old, or is Asian and not American. The site will succeed in attracting visitors if it is designed according to how humans think and behave.

According to the 25-year industry veteran, studies show that legibility is important not only for older people. Even the young, and those who have good eyesight, prefer larger text that’s easier to read.

Nielsen says there is also little difference between Internet users in Asia and those in the United States or Europe, because “they depend on the fundamental characteristics of the human brain, which are the same all over the world”.

In an e-mail interview with ZDNet Asia, Nielsen shares one of his pet peeves and talks about Usability Week 2007, his first Asian conference, which will be held in March 2007 in Hong Kong.


By Isabelle Chan, ZDNet Asia

Good usability transcends age, geography and culture, says usability expert Jakob Nielsen.

It doesn’t matter if a Web site targets an Internet surfer who is 20 and not 50 years old, or is Asian and not American. The site will succeed in attracting visitors if it is designed according to how humans think and behave.

According to the 25-year industry veteran, studies show that legibility is important not only for older people. Even the young, and those who have good eyesight, prefer larger text that’s easier to read.

Nielsen says there is also little difference between Internet users in Asia and those in the United States or Europe, because “they depend on the fundamental characteristics of the human brain, which are the same all over the world”.

In an e-mail interview with ZDNet Asia, Nielsen shares one of his pet peeves and talks about Usability Week 2007, his first Asian conference, which will be held in March 2007 in Hong Kong. Leer más “Usability makes business sense”