WSJ Webinar: Blogging for Business

More than just a consumer obsession, Twitter, Blogs, Facebook and other forms of Social Media are radically changing the way businesses operate across the Asia-Pacific region.

While companies know they can no longer afford to ignore discussions happening online, taking those first steps can be a difficult process.

Working in partnership with The Wall Street Journal and Citrix GoToWebinar, Ogilvy’s specialized Social Media team, 360 Digital Influence, has a series of tutorials to help companies take those first steps.

The latest in the series, “Blogging for Business”, will take place on June 2 at 11am Hong Kong time.

Blogs may have started as outposts for computer geeks or raging teens, but now they have become a powerful force in corporate communications from Sydney to Shanghai. They can demonstrate thought leadership, strengthen corporate reputation and strengthen brands.

Anuncios

by Thomas Crampton

More than just a consumer obsession, Twitter, Blogs, Facebook and other forms of Social Media are radically changing the way businesses operate across the Asia-Pacific region.

While companies know they can no longer afford to ignore discussions happening online, taking those first steps can be a difficult process.

Working in partnership with The Wall Street Journal and Citrix GoToWebinar, Ogilvy’s specialized Social Media team, 360 Digital Influence, has a series of tutorials to help companies take those first steps.

The latest in the series, “Blogging for Business”, will take place on June 2 at 11am Hong Kong time.

Blogs may have started as outposts for computer geeks or raging teens, but now they have become a powerful force in corporate communications from Sydney to Shanghai. They can demonstrate thought leadership, strengthen corporate reputation and strengthen brands. Leer más “WSJ Webinar: Blogging for Business”

Unbelievable: WSJ Calls Facebook’s Referring URLs a Privacy Violation (UPDATED)

In a jaw dropping move of bizarreness, Wall St. Journal writers Emily Steel and Jessica E. Vascellaro have called out major social networking websites tonight for violating user privacy apparently by passing profile page URLs to advertisers as the referring URLs when users click on ads. We’ve emailed both writers to ask for clarification in the event that they are in fact referring to something else, but haven’t heard back from them yet.

Update: Vascellaro has responded by email, emphasizing an apparently now-resolved if legitimate issue discussed vaguely as “in some cases” in the original story. Conflating that and the simple matter of referring URLs seems odd, to say the least. That said, it does appear that there was some grounds for debate around what was being communicated in some URLs. I’ve added some more thoughts, along with the text of Vascellaro’s more clear explanation by email, to the footer of this post. I don’t think the situation is as crazy now as I did when I first read it and wrote this post.

“Facebook, MySpace and several other social-networking sites have been sending data to advertising companies that could be used to find consumers’ names and other personal details, despite promises they don’t share such information without consent,” the article begins.


Written by Marshall Kirkpatrick

In a jaw dropping move of bizarreness, Wall St. Journal writers Emily Steel and Jessica E. Vascellaro have called out major social networking websites tonight for violating user privacy apparently by passing profile page URLs to advertisers as the referring URLs when users click on ads. We’ve emailed both writers to ask for clarification in the event that they are in fact referring to something else, but haven’t heard back from them yet.

Update: Vascellaro has responded by email, emphasizing an apparently now-resolved if legitimate issue discussed vaguely as “in some cases” in the original story. Conflating that and the simple matter of referring URLs seems odd, to say the least. That said, it does appear that there was some grounds for debate around what was being communicated in some URLs. I’ve added some more thoughts, along with the text of Vascellaro’s more clear explanation by email, to the footer of this post. I don’t think the situation is as crazy now as I did when I first read it and wrote this post.

Facebook, MySpace and several other social-networking sites have been sending data to advertising companies that could be used to find consumers’ names and other personal details, despite promises they don’t share such information without consent,” the article begins. Leer más “Unbelievable: WSJ Calls Facebook’s Referring URLs a Privacy Violation (UPDATED)”

Recap of the Technology

At the recent ReadWriteWeb Mobile Summit, I convened a session about emerging mobile applications for sensors and other Internet of Things technologies. It ended up being a lively discussion on the possibilities for new types of mobile apps that will take advantage of sensor and RFID data. The raw notes of the session are here, thanks to Pat Dash. In this post I’ll flesh out some of the ideas.

This will be a 2-part post. In Part 1, we’ll cover food and supply chain apps, social networking, and retail. In Part 2, we’ll look at future apps for environment, buildings, and health.
Recap of the Technology

First, let’s quickly re-visit the technology. Sensors, barcodes and RFID tags are all emerging methods of connecting real-world objects to the Internet. As I explained in my keynote presentation at the Mobile Summit, modern smart phones are increasingly being used to read and write this data.

Smart phones can be used as both readers (e.g. barcode scanning) and writers (e.g. swiping your phone over an RFID Reader to purchase a subway ticket).

Sensor technology is one of the most intriguing areas of innovation currently in smart phones. Firstly, the phone may read and act on sensor data from real world objects; data like temperature, noise and activity. Secondly, the phone may be used as a sensor itself; for example enabling other phone-toting people to sense your proximity to them.


At the recent ReadWriteWeb Mobile Summit, I convened a session about emerging mobile applications for sensors and other Internet of Things technologies. It ended up being a lively discussion on the possibilities for new types of mobile apps that will take advantage of sensor and RFID data. The raw notes of the session are here, thanks to Pat Dash. In this post I’ll flesh out some of the ideas.

This will be a 2-part post. In Part 1, we’ll cover food and supply chain apps, social networking, and retail. In Part 2, we’ll look at future apps for environment, buildings, and health.

Recap of the Technology

First, let’s quickly re-visit the technology. Sensors, barcodes and RFID tags are all emerging methods of connecting real-world objects to the Internet. As I explained in my keynote presentation at the Mobile Summit, modern smart phones are increasingly being used to read and write this data.

Smart phones can be used as both readers (e.g. barcode scanning) and writers (e.g. swiping your phone over an RFID Reader to purchase a subway ticket).

Sensor technology is one of the most intriguing areas of innovation currently in smart phones. Firstly, the phone may read and act on sensor data from real world objects; data like temperature, noise and activity. Secondly, the phone may be used as a sensor itself; for example enabling other phone-toting people to sense your proximity to them. Leer más “Recap of the Technology”

Microsoft presenta la nueva versión de su correo Hotmail

El nuevo Hotmail no solamente recibirá un lavado de cara necesario sino que además integrará características que facilitarán al usuario la lectura y organización de sus correos electrónicos, la previsualización de los contenidos adjuntos o la posibilidad de editar directamente documentos como presentaciones o textos.


windows live hotmail Microsoft presenta la nueva versión de su  correo Hotmail

Hotmail, el veterano cliente de correo electrónico de Microsoft y que cuenta con cerca de 360 millones de usuarios, recibirá próximamente un aluvión de nuevas funcionalidades en su proceso de intregación completa en el proyecto Windows Live con las mejoras de Wave 4.

El nuevo Hotmail no solamente recibirá un lavado de cara necesario sino que además integrará características que facilitarán al usuario la lectura y organización de sus correos electrónicos, la previsualización de los contenidos adjuntos o la posibilidad de editar directamente documentos como presentaciones o textos. Leer más “Microsoft presenta la nueva versión de su correo Hotmail”

Usar las fuentes de Google Font API en nuestras páginas web

Google Font API es una de las nuevas herramientas anunciadas ayer en el evento I/O 2010. Esta herramienta nos permite incluir tipografías open source en nuestros desarrollos web de una forma sencilla simplemente añadiendo una línea de código.

Google se encargará de almacenar estas tipografías en un directorio de fuentes que podremos utilizar con tres sencillos pasos:


Illustration of different font types and the n...
Image via Wikipedia

Google Font API es una de las nuevas herramientas anunciadas ayer en el evento I/O 2010. Esta herramienta nos permite incluir tipografías open source en nuestros desarrollos web de una forma sencilla simplemente añadiendo una línea de código.

Google se encargará de almacenar estas tipografías en un directorio de fuentes que podremos utilizar con tres sencillos pasos: Leer más “Usar las fuentes de Google Font API en nuestras páginas web”

Un negocio es más que una lista de clientes

Las marcas deben centrar su estrategia en consolidarse como tales olvidando las estrategias de comunicación que buscan obtener más y más clientes y descuidan a los actuales, según un análisis publicado en la revista 99percent.

El primer consejo de la publicación es crear una imagen de marca profesional y consistente, aquí hay que tener en cuenta el diseño y todas las facetas de los mensajes que un negocio emite, tanto a clientes como a competidores.

En según lugar las marcas deben apostar por construir “bienes inmobiliarios online”, es decir que las marcas deben entrar en internet pensando en que la red tiene memoria y Google constituye un mosaico de lo que se dice.


Las marcas deben centrar su estrategia en consolidarse como tales olvidando las estrategias de comunicación que buscan obtener más y más clientes y descuidan a los actuales, según un análisis publicado en la revista 99percent.

El primer consejo de la publicación es crear una imagen de marca profesional y consistente, aquí hay que tener en cuenta el diseño y todas las facetas de los mensajes que un negocio emite, tanto a clientes como a competidores.

En según lugar las marcas deben apostar por construir “bienes inmobiliarios online”, es decir que las marcas deben entrar en internet pensando en que la red tiene memoria y Google constituye un mosaico de lo que se dice. Leer más “Un negocio es más que una lista de clientes”

Google TV realiza su puesta de largo

Ya es oficial. El gigante de internet Google extiende también sus tentáculos al sector de la televisión. Con Google TV, cuya puesta de largo tuvo lugar ayer en San Francisco, la frontera entre internet y televisión se diluye.

El nuevo servicio de Google, basado en el sistema operativo Android y el chip Atom de Intel, permitirá al usuario ver la televisión y navegar por la red de manera simultánea. Es decir, será posible seguir un programa televisivo y al mismo tiempo buscar vídeos en la plataforma de vídeos YouTube o conectarse a la red social Facebook.

Los espectadores de Google TV podrán minimizar la pantalla de la emisión televisión que están viendo en ese momento para comenzar a navegar con internet y comentar el programa, por ejemplo, con sus amigos en Twitter. Tendrán la oportunidad, asimismo, de generar subtítulos de manera simultánea.


Ya es oficial. El gigante de internet Google extiende también sus tentáculos al sector de la televisión. Con Google TV, cuya puesta de largo tuvo lugar ayer en San Francisco, la frontera entre internet y televisión se diluye.

El nuevo servicio de Google, basado en el sistema operativo Android y el chip Atom de Intel, permitirá al usuario ver la televisión y navegar por la red de manera simultánea. Es decir, será posible seguir un programa televisivo y al mismo tiempo buscar vídeos en la plataforma de vídeos YouTube o conectarse a la red social Facebook.

Los espectadores de Google TV podrán minimizar la pantalla de la emisión televisión que están viendo en ese momento para comenzar a navegar con internet y comentar el programa, por ejemplo, con sus amigos en Twitter. Tendrán la oportunidad, asimismo, de generar subtítulos de manera simultánea. Leer más “Google TV realiza su puesta de largo”