Three levels of trust on Open Innovation

Por jabaldaia

Three levels of confidence

The teams on open innovation are sets of people from different organizations, which jointly develop new products, services or markets.

Organizational diversity facilitates the creation of knowledge, but it may brings some obstructions and prevent the success of open innovation. It is therefore essential to know how people entered in teams, create knowledge in open innovation and what problems they face.

Chesbrough, “Open Innovation”, states that the knowledge and information are two different things. The information has the potential to be used to create knowledge and does not require an expert as opposed to knowledge. Knowledge flows and resides in individuals. [Más…]


Por jabaldaia

Three levels of confidence

The teams on open innovation are sets of people from different organizations, which jointly develop new products, services or markets.

Organizational diversity facilitates the creation of knowledge, but it may brings some obstructions and prevent the success of open innovation. It is therefore essential to know how people entered in teams, create knowledge in open innovation and what problems they face.

Chesbrough, “Open Innovation”, states that the knowledge and information are two different things. The information has the potential to be used to create knowledge and does not require an expert as opposed to knowledge. Knowledge flows and resides in individuals. Leer más “Three levels of trust on Open Innovation”

Los clientes demandan de las agencias un capítulo de servicios cada vez más amplio

Las agencias de publicidad no pueden conformarse con ofrecer un único servicio al cliente si quieren satisfacerle plenamente. Deben estar preparadas, por lo tanto, para asumir un catálogo de encargos cada vez más amplio y diverso. Así se desprende de un estudio desarrollado en Alemania por el Registro Alemán de Agencias de Publicidad (VDWA) y el grupo Counterpart, informa W&V.

Según el informe, el 28% de las empresas exigen a las agencias que éstas conozcan previamente su sector y sus productos. Ese porcentaje se eleva al 45% en el ramo de las compañías B2B.


Las agencias de publicidad no pueden conformarse con ofrecer un único servicio al cliente si quieren satisfacerle plenamente. Deben estar preparadas, por lo tanto, para asumir un catálogo de encargos cada vez más amplio y diverso. Así se desprende de un estudio desarrollado en Alemania por el Registro Alemán de Agencias de Publicidad (VDWA) y el grupo Counterpart, informa W&V.

Según el informe, el 28% de las empresas exigen a las agencias que éstas conozcan previamente su sector y sus productos. Ese porcentaje se eleva al 45% en el ramo de las compañías B2B. Leer más “Los clientes demandan de las agencias un capítulo de servicios cada vez más amplio”

Crowdsourcing Has Its 15 Minutes of Fame

Sarah Firisen | Thought Leadership Manager, PwC Global Healthcare

Every movement has its defining moment, those 15 minutes of fame when it moves into the general consciousness and suddenly goes from niche to the next big thing. Sometimes, that move can be a good thing, an indicator that a topic will now command the attention and respect it is due as people take it more seriously. However, sometimes, well sometimes it means that everyone is jumping on the bandwagon just to jump. Overnight, it is the “cool” thing to do, the way to get some easy PR. There is a flash flood of attention and publicity that will saturate the market for a while before everyone moves onto the next big thing. One of the recent examples of this that comes to mind is virtual world technology; a couple of years ago you could not read news publications without a bombardment of predictions of how this was going to change the world. Then suddenly, the press pieces slowed to a trickle and all anyone could talk about was social media.


Sarah Firisen  |  Thought Leadership Manager, PwC Global Healthcare

Every movement has its defining moment, those 15 minutes of fame when it moves into the general consciousness and suddenly goes from niche to the next big thing. Sometimes, that move can be a good thing, an indicator that a topic will now command the attention and respect it is due as people take it more seriously. However, sometimes, well sometimes it means that everyone is jumping on the bandwagon just to jump. Overnight, it is the “cool” thing to do, the way to get some easy PR. There is a flash flood of attention and publicity that will saturate the market for a while before everyone moves onto the next big thing. One of the recent examples of this that comes to mind is virtual world technology; a couple of years ago you could not read news publications without a bombardment of predictions of how this was going to change the world. Then suddenly, the press pieces slowed to a trickle and all anyone could talk about was social media. Leer más “Crowdsourcing Has Its 15 Minutes of Fame”

Twitter espera tener cientos anunciantes a finales de año

Twitter espera tener cientos de anunciantes en el último trimestre del año, según dijo el responsable de la gestión financiera de la empresa, Dick Costolo a la agencia Reuters, quien piensa que la empresa se encamina a ser autosuficiente y rentable.

Costolo está convencido que el lanzamiento de entradas patrocinadas supondrá un pilar importante a la hora de comenzar a facturar y de justificar su valor como marca y como empresa.


Twitter espera tener cientos de anunciantes en el último trimestre del año, según dijo el responsable de la gestión financiera de la empresa, Dick Costolo a la agencia Reuters, quien piensa que la empresa se encamina a ser autosuficiente y rentable.

Costolo está convencido que el lanzamiento de entradas patrocinadas supondrá un pilar importante a la hora de comenzar a facturar y de justificar su valor como marca y como empresa. Leer más “Twitter espera tener cientos anunciantes a finales de año”

Innovation Failure Points – Strangled in the Crib

Submitted by Blogging Innovation

by Jeffrey Phillips

Innovation Failure Points – Strangled in the CribI am going to start a multi-part post today thinking about innovation’s failure points. Too often all we hear about are the innovation successes, yet if the statistics are right, there are far more “failures” than successes. I believe it is more interesting and more informative to consider the failures rather than the successes, in that every failure is instructive, while most successes are situational.

So, rather than looking at a successful result and assuming the process was valid, let’s consider innovation as a series of interconnected links, and find the likely failure points for innovation in that chain. As we look at weak links in the innovation chain our first stop is at the beginning.


Submitted by Blogging Innovation

by Jeffrey Phillips

Innovation Failure Points - Strangled in the CribI am going to start a multi-part post today thinking about innovation’s failure points. Too often all we hear about are the innovation successes, yet if the statistics are right, there are far more “failures” than successes. I believe it is more interesting and more informative to consider the failures rather than the successes, in that every failure is instructive, while most successes are situational.

So, rather than looking at a successful result and assuming the process was valid, let’s consider innovation as a series of interconnected links, and find the likely failure points for innovation in that chain. As we look at weak links in the innovation chain our first stop is at the beginning. Leer más “Innovation Failure Points – Strangled in the Crib”

Moving Beyond Open Innovation

Opening up R&D organizations to outside ideas has become a powerful weapon in the strategic arsenal of research managers. As Henry Chesbrough writes, “[O]pen innovation is a paradigm that assumes that firms can and should use external ideas as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as the firms look to advance their technology.” This strategy has been associated with notable commercial successes, such as Procter & Gamble’s SpinBrush, sourced not from internal R&D but rather a group of inventors in Cleveland. Increasingly, we see a coterie of firms from IBM to GlaxoSmithKline orienting their research strategy around open approaches.

But even textbook applications of open innovation still reflect a traditional emphasis in large organizations on large bets and big breakthroughs. In the end, what open innovation accomplishes is a shift of source for some big breakthroughs, from inside the company’s R&D organization to the outside.


The crowdsourcing process in eight steps.
Image via Wikipedia

Opening up R&D organizations to outside ideas has become a powerful weapon in the strategic arsenal of research managers. As Henry Chesbrough writes, “[O]pen innovation is a paradigm that assumes that firms can and should use external ideas as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as the firms look to advance their technology.”  This strategy has been associated with notable commercial successes, such as Procter & Gamble’s SpinBrush, sourced not from internal R&D but rather a group of inventors in Cleveland. Increasingly, we see a coterie of firms from IBM to GlaxoSmithKline orienting their research strategy around open approaches.

But even textbook applications of open innovation still reflect a traditional emphasis in large organizations on large bets and big breakthroughs. In the end, what open innovation accomplishes is a shift of source for some big breakthroughs, from inside the company’s R&D organization to the outside. Leer más “Moving Beyond Open Innovation”

Qué hacer y qué no hacer para gestionar con éxito un blog corporativo

La Web 2.0 proporciona a las compañías múltiples canales para entablar comunicación directa con sus clientes. Uno de ellos es el blog corporativo, cuya implantación gana terreno día a día en el sector empresarial. A fin de convertirlo en una herramienta de éxito que realmente promueva el diálogo con el cliente, la revista Acquisa recomienda atenerse a las siguientes recomendaciones


La Web 2.0 proporciona a las compañías múltiples canales para entablar comunicación directa con sus clientes. Uno de ellos es el blog corporativo, cuya implantación gana terreno día a día en el sector empresarial. A fin de convertirlo en una herramienta de éxito que realmente promueva el diálogo con el cliente, la revista Acquisa recomienda atenerse a las siguientes recomendaciones:

1. El ritmo de actualización del blog debe ser constante.
2. Hay que definir con exactitud el público objetivo del blog. Leer más “Qué hacer y qué no hacer para gestionar con éxito un blog corporativo”

Reflexiones sobre Internet Mobile

Tras asistir el pasado día 5 de mayo a la presentación del primer estudio trimestral sobre el uso de Internet móvil por parte de Nielsen Online y TapTap Networks, el dato más destacable arrojado por el citado estudio, es, sin duda, el incremento durante el pasado año en un 47% del acceso a Internet vía móvil.

El dato citado anteriormente nos indica una tendencia más que interesante en el acceso a Internet y al consumo de contenidos por parte de los usuarios, tendencia que a juzgar por la opinión de los expertos en la materia y por la información recogida en diferentes estudios tales como ‘Móviles y publicidad: percepción, usos y tendencias‘ de Zed Digital presentado el pasado año, parece imparable.

Este nuevo canal que ya empieza a no ser tan nuevo, está teniendo un desarrollo e implantación que se asemeja bastante al que tuvo Internet en su momento, siguiendo el camino marcado por éste y evitando muchos de los errores cometidos.

En esta línea de paralelismo con el desarrollo de Internet, apuntar que diferentes agencias de publicidad y/o empresas del sector, en Genetsis por ejemplo estamos siguiendo esta línea, se están empezando a crear pequeñas áreas dentro de sus estructuras, enfocadas a los dispositivos móviles, tanto al nivel de marketing como a nivel de desarrollo. Este hecho recuerda a lo que hicieron en su día las agencias tradicionales cuando empezó a asomar la cabeza la publicidad online, creando pequeños departamentos que en algunos casos, y a día de hoy, han ‘colonizado’ la empresa por completo.


Tras asistir el pasado día 5 de mayo a la presentación del primer estudio trimestral sobre el uso de Internet móvil por parte de Nielsen Online y TapTap Networks, el dato más destacable arrojado por el citado estudio, es, sin duda, el incremento durante el pasado año en un 47% del acceso a Internet vía móvil.

El dato citado anteriormente nos indica una tendencia más que interesante en el acceso a Internet y al consumo de contenidos por parte de los usuarios, tendencia que a juzgar por la opinión de los expertos en la materia y por la información recogida en diferentes estudios tales como ‘Móviles y publicidad: percepción, usos y tendencias‘ de Zed Digital presentado el pasado año, parece imparable.

Este nuevo canal que ya empieza a no ser tan nuevo, está teniendo un desarrollo e implantación que se asemeja bastante al que tuvo Internet en su momento, siguiendo el camino marcado por éste y evitando muchos de los errores cometidos.

En esta línea de paralelismo con el desarrollo de Internet, apuntar que diferentes agencias de publicidad y/o empresas del sector, en Genetsis por ejemplo estamos siguiendo esta línea, se están empezando a crear pequeñas áreas dentro de sus estructuras, enfocadas a los dispositivos móviles, tanto al nivel de marketing como a nivel de desarrollo. Este hecho recuerda a lo que hicieron en su día las agencias tradicionales cuando empezó a asomar la cabeza la publicidad online, creando pequeños departamentos que en algunos casos, y  a día de hoy, han ‘colonizado’ la empresa por completo. Leer más “Reflexiones sobre Internet Mobile”

Web Design Trends for 2010

Purists will say that great design is timeless. Yes, in an ideal world, we should ignore trends.

Pragmatically speaking, though, there is a lot of value in monitoring and incorporating design trends, especially with regard to websites.

Let’s face it: the web changes at a rapid pace. Unlike in other media, design trends on the web are not just driven by aesthetics.

Technology is changing that can drastically alter the capabilities of the medium.

In 2010, we’re seeing designers continuing to push the boundaries of web design, setting the following clear trends…


Techi.com

Purists will say that great design is timeless. Yes, in an ideal world, we should ignore trends.

Pragmatically speaking, though, there is a lot of value in monitoring and incorporating design trends, especially with regard to websites.

Let’s face it: the web changes at a rapid pace. Unlike in other media, design trends on the web are not just driven by aesthetics.

Technology is changing that can drastically alter the capabilities of the medium.

In 2010, we’re seeing designers continuing to push the boundaries of web design, setting the following clear trends…

Wise Words from Freelancer to Freelancer – 8 Tips to Help You

I’ve taken a bold step into the industry on my own. Since going solo, I’ve been thrust into the deep end and I’ve followed a somewhat steep learning curve. Although the lessons I share with you in this article today is not specifically design related, they have played a part in my graphic design journey.

Wise Words from Freelancer to Freelancer

8 Tips to Help You to Become a Better Freelancer

I hope through sharing my experiences with you, you will be able to benefit from it as your embark on your own journey as a freelance graphic designer.


I’ve taken a bold step into the industry on my own. Since going solo, I’ve been thrust into the deep end and I’ve followed a somewhat steep learning curve. Although the lessons I share with you in this article today is not specifically design related, they have played a part in my graphic design journey.

Wise Words from Freelancer to Freelancer
Image credit: Leonie

8 Tips to Help You to Become a Better Freelancer

I hope through sharing my experiences with you, you will be able to benefit from it as your embark on your own journey as a freelance graphic designer. Leer más “Wise Words from Freelancer to Freelancer – 8 Tips to Help You”

A Freelancer’s Eternal Dilemma: Full Time or Part Time?

A freelancer’s most difficult decision would come at a point when it’s time to choose between going full-time or continuing part-time. The issue is not whether to make the change or not, but rather if you are ready to make this big jump or not.

Going all the way and plunging into the business of being an entrepreneur is not a small decision. It is a great prospect to be your own boss, do your own projects and make a good living from the comfort of your own home.


A freelancer’s most difficult decision would come at a point when it’s time to choose between going full-time or continuing part-time. The issue is not whether to make the change or not, but rather if you are ready to make this big jump or not.

Going all the way and plunging into the business of being an entrepreneur is not a small decision. It is a great prospect to be your own boss, do your own projects and make a good living from the comfort of your own home.

Part time or Full time
Image credit: Keriivy

Many have made the mistake of jumping into the deep end too soon and too unprepared; a mistake that can drain you of your passion and put you into great financial, mental and emotional turmoil.

Before making any major decisions, consider carefully if you are ready to go into the business full time. Leer más “A Freelancer’s Eternal Dilemma: Full Time or Part Time?”

Take Your Blog To The Top Of Search Results With SEO PowerSuite

You may have the greatest blog ever with mind-blowing design and captivating content, but if you just sit and wait for people to come and read it, chances are they won’t. In today’s world you need to get out there and promote your blog to get more eyeballs on your writing. One of the best ways to do it is by optimizing your blog for the search engines.

If you take a look at the traffic sources of the top blogs in any niche you’ll notice that a large chunk of their visitors come via search engines. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) has become one of the most effective promotion tools in the blogger’s arsenal. But when you blog regularly, reply to comments, and work hard to grow a community around your blog you may not have enough time to invest in SEO, and professional SEOs charge an arm and a leg. So how do you optimize your blog without stealing the time from blogging or forking out for SEO services?


You may have the greatest blog ever with mind-blowing design and captivating content, but if you just sit and wait for people to come and read it, chances are they won’t. In today’s world you need to get out there and promote your blog to get more eyeballs on your writing. One of the best ways to do it is by optimizing your blog for the search engines.

If you take a look at the traffic sources of the top blogs in any niche you’ll notice that a large chunk of their visitors come via search engines. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) has become one of the most effective promotion tools in the blogger’s arsenal. But when you blog regularly, reply to comments, and work hard to grow a community around your blog you may not have enough time to invest in SEO, and professional SEOs charge an arm and a leg. So how do you optimize your blog without stealing the time from blogging or forking out for SEO services? Leer más “Take Your Blog To The Top Of Search Results With SEO PowerSuite”

10 Observations on Duct Tape Marketing’s Dirty Little Marketing Research Secret

“the one place I turn to keep myself rooted in how the world thinks and buys, you know, marketing research, is PEOPLE magazine.” – John Jantsch (Duct Tape Marketing)

Interesting. I was taking a gander at the book Duct Tape Marketing, and this advice about People magazine was kind of unique.

After all, often, we are what we read, and so as someone who helps run a company, writes software, does customer support, does marketing, writes more software, etc. I’m constantly reading the likes of Hacker News, Wired, Reddit, technology and marketing blogs.

But I’d probably bet a good majority of customers of popular software on the web (like say Basecamp) haven’t even heard of Hacker News. But I bet they’ve at least skimmed a People magazine more than once.



“the one place I turn to keep myself rooted in how the world thinks and buys, you know, marketing research, is PEOPLE magazine.” – John Jantsch (Duct Tape Marketing)

Interesting. I was taking a gander at the book Duct Tape Marketing, and this advice about People magazine was kind of unique.

After all, often, we are what we read, and so as someone who helps run a company, writes software, does customer support, does marketing, writes more software, etc. I’m constantly reading the likes of Hacker News, Wired, Reddit, technology and marketing blogs.

But I’d probably bet a good majority of customers of popular software on the web (like say Basecamp) haven’t even heard of Hacker News. But I bet they’ve at least skimmed a People magazine more than once. Leer más “10 Observations on Duct Tape Marketing’s Dirty Little Marketing Research Secret”

37 Things you probably haven’t heard at your software company

I was reminded the other day of the Dilbert cartoon above and it got me to thinking about what other stuff we might not hear around the office at a software company as product managers and product marketing folks.


Posted by Jon Gatrell

I was reminded the other day of the Dilbert cartoon above and it got me to thinking about what other stuff we might not hear around the office at a software company as product managers and product marketing folks. Leer más “37 Things you probably haven’t heard at your software company”

How do you get people to care about privacy?

From today’s MediaPost Social Media Insider

4617591602_ed2cd9ded4_b

How do you get people to care about privacy?

People care about it in offline settings. At home, you know which window shades you prefer to draw closed at which times. At work, you might discuss Saturday night’s exploits with your cubicle-mate and not with your boss. Few can tell online; I can’t. I avoid networks like blippy that share purchases based on credit card data, and I turned off Google Latitude’s option of automatically broadcasting my location from mobile devices, but I’m admittedly inconsistent and too laissez-faire with most other forms of social media.

The latest debates over Facebook’s privacy policies may not last, but there’s a lot of good coming out of the dialogue. If Facebook won’t clearly explain how it publicizes consumers’ information, others are trying to fill the void. Most resources have the echo-chamber effect, only reaching people who care about privacy and social media to begin with. But if enough of these echoes escape and start ricocheting around the water coolers where more Facebook users hang out, then there’s a chance to bring the discussion to people who wouldn’t intentionally look for it.

Let’s look at several attempts to raise awareness about these privacy issues, and how likely they’ll break through the echo chamber:

Matt McKeon’s The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook (via All Facebook)

I keep returning to these illustrations of how Facebook’s default privacy settings have changed over the years. In 2005, userswould share some profile info with friends and their networks. By 2007, basic information was shared with all Facebook users. Now, the default settings allow almost all information to be shared with the entire Internet.

I’ve spent far longer studying the diagrams here than the text, and it’s striking going back and forth between the 2005 and 2010 images. If you’ve seen anything this clear in mainstream media, please share it in the comments, as these infographics are screaming for more exposure.

ReclaimPrivacy.org (via Anthony Haney on Facebook)

Using a bookmarklet you can drag to your browser’s bookmarks, log into Facebook and the link will tell you how secure your privacy settings are. As I continue to violate best practices for maintaining privacy, you can see a screen shot of ReclaimPrivacy’s review of my own settings. Somehow I managed to block all known applications that could leak my personal information, which must have been a fluke. All of my other settings are rated “caution” or “insecure.”

The best part of the tool is that it fixes some of your settings for you. Yet will you really trust a random tool more than Facebook? OK, maybe. Beyond coming from a largely unknown source, the bookmarklet approach will turn off more novice Internet users. It does work, though.

Openbook (via Danny Sullivan at Search Engine Land and MediaPost)

What if you could shame people into changing their privacy settings? Openbook searches public status updates for potentially questionable phrases people may share on Facebook. I’ve linked directly to one of the tamer ones, but if you clear the search field and search for something random, what comes up may not fly on network television. Many of the status updates are harmless, but some could be damaging. Searching the phrase “don’t tell anyone,” someone noted how she’s playing hooky from her job, and her profile page says what school district she works for. That won’t help her case for tenure if her district faces budget cuts this year.

I’m not sure how many people will see this, but using live examples of real people makes it easy to relate to them, and if you don’t change your settings because of it, you may well think twice about what you post on Facebook.

Diaspora

Tired of changing your settings? Are you one of ten people who left Facebook in the past month and now have your picture in a major national newspaper as the sign of a trend? Then do I have the network for you! Join Diaspora, “the privacy aware, personally controlled, do-it-all distributed open source social network.” If that’s not the tagline for the next 500 million-user social network, I don’t know what is. About 5,000 chipped in nearly $200,000 to make this project happen, well above the $10,000 goal. Aiming low has its perks.

Sorry, but I don’t know how that anti-Facebook angst translates into a Facebook rival. People weren’t looking to leave Six Degrees or Friendster or MySpace; they just kept finding something better and brought more of their friends. There are limits to that scale, so soon enough investors will seek social networks for nematodes or bacteria just to hit growth projections.

I’m not convinced any of these approaches are enough, and the privacy issue is hardly unique to social media. I know my bank has had digital security breaches, but I keep my money there, even if I change my password every so often. There are marketing services firms focused on direct mail and other channels that will probably collect far more data than Facebook ever will.

Facebook gets more attention, though, because it’s new, it’s massive, and we have more control over it than we’re used to. We can do something about it. It’s the monster under the bed we can overcome by shining a flashlight down below and realizing we have nothing to fear.

Yet sometimes it’s more fun to stay on the bed, worry ourselves to sleep, and wait until the morning comes, when we know for sure there’s no monster that can hurt us.


From today’s MediaPost Social Media Insider

4617591602_ed2cd9ded4_b

How do you get people to care about privacy?

People care about it in offline settings. At home, you know which window shades you prefer to draw closed at which times. At work, you might discuss Saturday night’s exploits with your cubicle-mate and not with your boss. Few can tell online; I can’t. I avoid networks like blippy that share purchases based on credit card data, and I turned off Google Latitude‘s option of automatically broadcasting my location from mobile devices, but I’m admittedly inconsistent and too laissez-faire with most other forms of social media. Leer más “How do you get people to care about privacy?”