There Is No Mobile Internet! // @smashingmag –

By Marek Wolski

A Quiet Change

At the beginning of June, Google published on its Webmaster Central Blog its “Recommendations for Building Smartphone-Optimized Websites.” Its recommendations are that responsiveness — or, where necessary, device-specific HTML — is the way to build websites for today. Both methods are based on all devices accessing one URL, which in Google’s words makes it “easier for your users to interact with, share, and link to…”

Following the recommendation means making most of your Web content accessible across devices. It ensures that each link shared across the Web leads back to the same place and that, irrespective of the user’s device, everyone gets the same design experience. It aims to standardize Web design approaches, but also to standardize user experience expectations.

Shortly after, Apple announced a lot of thrilling updates to iOS 6. One of the least talked about was Safari’s iCloud tabs. This syncs your open browser tabs and allows you to continue browsing from where you left off on another device. Google’s recent version of Chrome for iOS has the same feature. The result? The ultimate cross-media surfing experience, a digital doggy bag.

After many years of Internet people working on standards, technologies and practices to bring about a One Web experience, the two companies made a big push towards making it a reality. We are now a big step closer to, in the words of the W3C, “an Internet where as far as reasonably possible, the same information and services are available to users irrespective of the device they are using.” Well, that is only if website owners and brands get their act together and change their old ways. To do so, they will need to recognize that things aren’t what they seem and aren’t what many are still peddling.

Full article

Old Habits, Old Stereotypes

A couple of years ago, mobile devices couldn’t even handle many of the Web’s fundamental standards (JavaScript, for example). But as devices became as powerful as last year’s MacBook, the technology drove a behavioral shift. It wasn’t just early adopters who were using the mobile Web. It was every person and their dog with a smartphone and a 3G connection (around 75% of smartphone owners surf the Web).

Our Mobile Planet - General Smartphone Activities
Image source: Our Mobile Planet.

The line between what is and isn’t Web-enabled is blurring. People don’t see the Internet on their phone or tablet as being the “mobile Internet.” It’s just the Internet. In the words of mobile expert Brad Frost, “mobile users will do anything and everything desktop users will do, provided it’s presented in a usable way.”

For the last few years, across categories, mobile experience benchmarking studies have been filled with recommendations to broaden and deepen the content available. Users are searching more and longer for information that currently isn’t available on mobile or even tablet devices.

Mobile Site vs Full Site
Image source: Strangeloop.

This desire for information is prevalent and strong enough that many opt for a less than optimal visit to the “full site” in order to access more or other information. The fact that almost a third of mobile users are prepared to endure poor navigation, slow loading times and no touch optimization really underscores the presence of this fundamental behavior.

Full article

…de los realizadores de EDUCANDO AL SOBERANO I, II y III Llega… El Último Intento!! // @CrazyEgg

Es un tema de debate y consulta entre Colegas, Veo el iceberg y Conduzco mi barco directo a él.
Buenos Aires, Argentina – Feb 2013

A nuestros Queridos Clientes!
en ocasiones no logramos que nuestras palabras y recomendaciones lleguen a vuestros oídos.

Contratan un equipo de profesionales y luego gustan de no escuchar, y creéis saber todo de todo. Comparto una pequeña de recomendaciones de terceros, que seguramente ayudaran a su Marca, Producto, Servicio y Estrategia…

Saludos cordiales! :D
PS. si Ud. insiste al respecto solo diremos, “el cliente siempre tiene la razón”, nunca se equivoca, nosotros no lo interpretamos…

The Best Websites In The World Do These 6 Things…

Check list 

Seguir leyendo “…de los realizadores de EDUCANDO AL SOBERANO I, II y III Llega… El Último Intento!! // @CrazyEgg” “13-point checklist before you launch your next campaign” / @ioninteractive

13 Ways To Elevate Your Landing Pages

Each online marketing campaign is a marriage of three key elements: strategic
advertising, high-performance landing pages, and efficient post-conversion execution.
If you fail to execute just one of these critical facets, your leads may shy away.
So before you launch your next campaign, run your landing page through this
13-point checklist and make sure that you have the basics covered.

ion interactive - Optimizing Marketing Performance Beyond Landing Pages | @ioninteractive
by Anna Talerico

High-performance landing pages are:

User-Centric. Think about the user experience first and foremost.
Put yourself in your visitor’s shoes and run through your landing
page experience. Is your page informative, enjoyable, and visually
pleasing? Or is it disorganized, confusing, or lacking key

Fluid. If your landing page contains links to other interior or external
pages, ensure that these transitions run smoothly by keeping both your
visual elements and your messaging consistent throughout.
Don’t forget to use your confirmation page to remind visitors what
they’ve just signed up for.

Seguir leyendo “ “13-point checklist before you launch your next campaign” / @ioninteractive”

The Brand New Printed Smashing Book: “The Mobile Book”


When setting up the concept of the book, we worked hard to ensure a delicate balance between basic knowledge and the current state of the art. Please note that changes to chapter titles are still possible.

Jeremy Keith Foreword
Peter-Paul Koch What’s Going on in Mobile?
Stephanie Rieger The Future of Mobile
Trent Walton Responsive Design Strategies
Brad Frost Responsive Design Patterns
Dave Olsen Optimization For Mobile
Dennis Kardys Hands On Design for Mobile (UX Perspective)
Greg Nudelman
Rian van der Merwe
Mobile UX Design Patterns
Josh Clark Designing With Gestures and Touch

Jeremy Keith Peter-Paul Koch Stephanie Rieger Trent Walton Brad Frost Dave Olsen Dennis Kardys Greg Nudelman Rian van der Merwe Josh Clark
From left to right: Jeremy Keith, Peter-Paul Koch, Stephanie Rieger, Trent Walton, Brad Frost, Dave Olsen, Dennis Kardys, Greg Nudelman, Rian van der Merwe and Josh Clark.


What’s In The Book?

The Mobile Book

When it comes to mobile, there are more open questions than definitive answers. Due to its fragmentation, it’s not so easy to understand how the mobile market looks and works in general. How can you pick the right mobile strategy and select the right approach for your website? What design patterns and what UX techniques can assist you to design faster and more effectively for mobile devices? What design patterns do you need to be aware of when building responsive websites and what patterns will help you optimize the performance for mobile? When you design with mobile in mind, how exactly should your design process differ from a traditional design workflow?

Our new book attempts to answer these questions. Well-known experts such as Peter-Paul Koch, Stephanie Rieger, Trent Walton, Brad Frost, Dave Olsen, Josh Clark and Remy Sharp have contributed to the book to present the most relevant and valuable insights. To ensure the quality of the material, the chapters have been reviewed by Scott Jenson, Bryan Rieger, Tim Kadlec, Bruce Lawson and other active members of the mobile design community. The foreword was written by Jeremy Keith. It wasn’t easy to bring together such a stellar line-up of experts, but a compromise wasn’t an option.



In discussions about user experience on mobile, we tend to make general assumptions about the environment in which users will be using an app or a website on their mobile device. However, mobile context is a myth. We can’t make any realistic assumptions about the context because we just don’t know anything definite about it — when and how the device is used or what connectivity it currently has. Obviously we can plan for different scenarios — and so we should — but mobile context is often as unpredictable as particle physics. We just don’t know for sure when mobile devices are being used – on-the-go, in the kitchen, or when watching TV.

In the first chapter of the book, Peter-Paul Koch and Stephanie Rieger explore the mechanics of the mobile world and the ongoing developments in the industry.

“[We’ve had] a total of 880 million Android & iOS devices entering the market in just over five years. Consider the shift that occurs when iOS & Android put a combined billion [mobile] devices in people’s hands. That’s almost half the Internet population of the world and equivalent to the total number of (Windows) PCs in use around the world. Mobile first yet?”

— Luke Wroblewski

Mobile Landscape
The first chapter of our new “Mobile Book” describes the mobile landscape and provides insights about the future of mobile.


As a result of random assumptions, we tend to think that mobile experiences should be the “light” versions of traditional “desktop” experiences — because well, that’s what users need. However, research shows that 80% of users want to have all “desktop” features on mobile — they want to be able to use the features everywhere, and in a similar way. That’s when meaningful, performance-optimized responsive design solutions become important. In thesecond chapter, Trent Walton introduces strategies for developing responsive websites, Brad Frost discusses emerging responsive design patterns and Dave Olsen explains what you need to know to optimize the performance of mobile websites. Seguir leyendo “The Brand New Printed Smashing Book: “The Mobile Book””

Pay To “Highlight” Your Facebook Status Updates To More Friends – A Reckless New Ads Test

Highlight Featured Image

Only 12% of your friends see your average status update, but Facebook is testing an option called “Highlight” that lets you pay a few dollars to have one of your posts appear to more friends. Highlight lets the average user, not Pages or businesses, select an “important post” and “make sure friends see this”, but not color it yellow as Stuff wrote when it first spotted the feature. A tiny percentage of the user base is now seeing tests of a paid version of Highlight, but there’s also a free one designed to check if users are at all interested in the option.

Highlight could show Facebook’s willingness to try more aggressive ways of making money, which should delight potential investors. But Facebook is playing with fire here. The service has always been free for users, and a pay-for-popularity feature could be a huge turn off, especially to its younger and less financially equipped users who couldn’t afford such narcissism.

The official statement from Facebook on this is:

“We’re constantly testing new features across the site. This particular test is simply to gauge people’s interest in this method of sharing with their friends.”

I doubt Facebook is going to see positive reactions to Highlight, but if it did it could turn into an unpredicted revenue stream. Just the fact that Facebook would test this could bolster confidence for potential IPO investors. They want to know the company is interested in striking a more advertiser-friendly balance between a pure user experience and the goals of advertisers. That’s especially important now, as yesterday Facebook had to warn investors that its ad business is in jeopardy as more users access via mobile where it doesn’t show nearly as many ads.

But the problem is the potential for Highlighted updates to reduce the general relevance of the news feed. Facebook’s news feed sorting algorithm is designed to show you posts by your closest friends or that have received a lot of Likes and comments. Highlight distorts this, and will encourage news feed spamming club promoters, musicians, small businesses, or anyone else with something to gain from more clicks.

HOW HIGHLIGHT WORKS… Seguir leyendo “Pay To “Highlight” Your Facebook Status Updates To More Friends – A Reckless New Ads Test”

Role To The Goal: How Developing Role-Based Personas Can Increase Conversions

A lot has been shown about the effectiveness of preparing customer personas. They help your whole team stay on track about who your websiteis for and add empathy to your process.

Creating lifelong customer value with your aff...

Commonly, customer personas are based on demographic and behavioral data. Demographic data is useful when your website is targeted at a very specific audience. For example; retirees who like to play golf. Behavioral personas goes deeper than demographic data and help you define the intrinsic wants and needs of your customer.

Both of these persona models are especially helpful when it comes to business model design, marketing, and branding. However, if you already have these in place and are now focusing on website conversion optimization, I’d like to introduce to you a third type of persona, the role-based persona.

Most of the time, people are visiting a website to fulfill a particular goal. They are on a mission! They don’t read everything and they certainly don’t linger around on a site clicking links out of curiosity, as many of us would like to believe. If something gets in their way, most of the time, they simply leave.

Here’s how you can avoid that and why role-based personas are useful for conversion optimization.

Role-based personas help you cater to your user’s goals and thus, fulfill your own conversion goals.

Here are some unique benefits to preparing role-based personas:

  • They do not assume a gender, age, income level, etc. This helps you expand your efforts to a wider group of people should you choose to do so.
  • They help you work with the dreaded tunnel-vision phenom. This is what happens when visitors are so focused on their goal that they don’t see anything else on your site.
  • They empower your users. By anticipating what your visitor’s goals are, you go a long way in making your visitor not feel stupid. Believe me, the last thing you want a potential customer to feel is stupid when they visit your site. Seguir leyendo “Role To The Goal: How Developing Role-Based Personas Can Increase Conversions”

DayWatch herramienta para analizar en tiempo real el mercado de los descuentos online


Pulso Social

Incubada por Ingenio, la startup uruguaya Tryolabs se dedica al desarrollo de aplicaciones para Internet con componentes de inteligencia artificial como Python/Django app basadas en machine learning y natual language processing.

El equipo emprendedor está comandado por Martín Alcalá Rubí (CEO y Business Manager), Raúl Garreta (CTO y Product Manager) y Ernesto Rodríguez (CXO y Chief User Experience Officer).

Con un portafolio de clientes que ya incluye proyectos en California y Silicon Valley,

“Permite obtener información del mercado inspeccionando en tiempo real y de forma interactiva todas las ofertas de la región. Obtiene de manera sistematizada reportes  y  métricas de negocio como market shares, penetración de mercado, niveles de ventas, descuentos y posicionamiento de mercado” sostiene Alcalá Rubí.

La plataforma DayWatch integra un sofisticado motor de inteligencia artificial capaz de agrupar ofertas automáticamente por rubros y generar proyecciones de mercado, que permite al usuario obtener análisis de tendencias y recomendaciones para su estrategia de venta.

Conformado por 4 paneles: Tiempo Real, Análisis, Histórico e Inteligente, el lenguaje de gráficos muestra el comportamiento de todos los portales de ventas colectivas y permite hacer comparaciones de desempeño. Seguir leyendo “DayWatch herramienta para analizar en tiempo real el mercado de los descuentos online”

Seven Tips for Creating Killer Product Pages
If you run an e-commerce site, your product pages are the moment of truth for your business. Either they convert your visitor into a customer or they don’t. This is not new information. Everyone knows that successful product pages are important to a successful e-commerce website; so why are there so many bad ones out there?Each visitor that makes it to a product page represents the heavy lifting and money spent to get them there. The product page is not the time to squander that hard work.

It’s up to you to create a user experience that gives the visitor what they need to become a customer.So what’s the definition of a good product page user experience (UX)? Simple: one that provides the information, assurances and motivation the visitor needs to become your customer.

This definition will vary from site to site and industry to industry, so it’s up to you to test and find the mix that works best for your business.To help you get started, we asked the UX pros at digital-telepathy, a user experience design company, to identify things you can do right now to improve the user experience of your product pages. Below are seven ways to get more from your product pages, with examples from some of their favorite e-commerce product pages and insight into what makes them work so well.Note: What works for these sites might not work for yours. It’s up to you to test features and functionalityagainst your existing product pages to determine what works best for your business.

Tip One: Cut the Clutter… Seguir leyendo “Seven Tips for Creating Killer Product Pages”

How To Design a 404 Page That Keeps Visitors On Your Site

User Experience
You shouldn’t understate its utility.  The 404 page is perhaps the most neglected web design element.

When your website visitors land on your 404 Page Not Found page, it can be everything from a major inconvenience to a pleasant surprise.


While this page has the sole function of telling the user where to go next, the creation of your 404 page should be approached from both a creative and functional point of view.

In this article I’ll present a few techniques to keep in mind when designing 404 pages of your own.

1. Explain the Issue

Ease the worry in the user’s mind by addressing the issue that landed them on this page. Simple errors may be a mistyped URL, slight variations in the URL, or even a recent site re-launch.

Gog’s 404 page alerts users the page doesn’t exist, and then encourages them to check their spelling and try again. If that fails, they also have the option of reporting an error. The simple design also stays true to the design of and allows for easy navigation through the menu and search bar at the top.

This 404 page gives the user a few valid reasons why the page doesn’t exist. This actual 404 page is integrated into the design of the site, placing no doubt in the user’s mind where they are. Doing so also allows the user easy access to other content on site and encourages them to stick around. Seguir leyendo “How To Design a 404 Page That Keeps Visitors On Your Site”

Visual Design and Usability Yellow Brick Road
by Tammy Guy

One of the main disadvantages of online shoppingcompared to in-store shopping is the lack of guidance.

 Walking into any retail location, customers may be greeted with a smiling face asking, “May I help you find what you’re looking for?” Online shoppers, on the other hand, are often forced to find their own way, and secretly wish for that smiling face to help them.

Visual designers have the power to change this scenario and pave the yellow brick road for users, creating a seamless and enjoyable browsing experience that can replace the smiling greeter at the door.

The yellow brick road is the users’ visual path. It allows them to follow a pattern to not only find their final destination, but also to always know where they are within the broader context of the site—no matter how many turns, bumps, distractions, and forks in the road they traverse along the way.

Visual paths guide users from one element to another, and allow designers to control how information is being perceived and in what order. Because readers can only absorb a certain amount of information at one time, it’s imperative to present content using a phased approach. Guide users through information-carrying areas that will help them determine which turns to take next in order to arrive at their final destination or, at a minimum, their next turn/action. Seguir leyendo “Visual Design and Usability Yellow Brick Road”

5 warning signs: Does A/B testing lead to crappy products?


Above: Hollywood sequels follow from risk-averse design decisions, like the widely panned Godfather Part 3

The dangers of the metrics-driven design process
Many readers of this blog are expert practitioners of metrics-driven product development, and with this audience in mind, my post today is on the dangers of going overboard with analytics.

I think that this is an important topic because the metrics-driven philosophy has come to dominate the Facebook/OpenSocial ecosystem, with negative consequences. App developers have pursued short-term goals and easy money – leading to many copycat and uninspired products.

At the same time, it’s clear that A/B testing and metrics culture serves only to generate more data-points, and what you do with that data is up to you. Smart decisions made by entrepreneurs must still be employed to reach successful outcomes. (Thus, my answer to the title question is that no, A/B testing does NOT lead to crappy products, but poor decision-making around data can absolutely lead to it)

So let’s talk about the dangers of being overly metrics-driven – here are a couple of the key issues that can come up >>>> Seguir leyendo “5 warning signs: Does A/B testing lead to crappy products?”

Why User Experience Is Critical To Customer Relationships

BY FC EXPERT BLOGGER BRIAN SOLIS | http://www.fastcompany.comUser experience is a priority that should, in some way, find a home within the design of any new-media strategy.

This is part one of a limited series on the need for brands to employ UX in new-media strategies to improve customer experiences and engagement.

With the explosion of social media and smart devices, customers are becoming incredibly sophisticated, elusive, and empowered. As a result, the dynamics that govern the relationship between brands and customers is evolving.

But even in this era of engagement and “two-way” conversations, the reality is that the relationship businesses hope to have with customers through these new devices, applications, or networks and their true state are not one in the same. In fact, it is woefully one-sided, and usually not to the advantage of customers, which for all intents and purposes still affects businesses.

Rather than examine the role new technologies and platforms can play in improving customer relationships and experiences, many businesses invest in “attendance” strategies where a brand is present in both trendy and established channels, but not defining meaningful experiences or outcomes. Simply stated, businesses are underestimating the significance of customer experiences. Seguir leyendo “Why User Experience Is Critical To Customer Relationships”

What the Demise of Flash Means for the User Experience

By SuAnne Hall Hall

Adobe’s decision to cease development of the mobile Flash platform and increase their investment in HTML5-related efforts created perhaps the final piece of conclusive evidence that HTML5 is the current go-to technology for creating ubiquitous user experiences regardless of device.

While there’s been an abundant amount of discussion on what this means to developers, there’s been a lack of focus on what this means to the overall user experience (UX). If HTML5 thrives where Flash struggled and becomesthe dominator in the choice for new mobile and desktop technology, will users benefit from the transition? Yes, as long as designers and developers do their jobs right.

Different stroke for different folks

Apples and oranges. The question is, which one’s Flash?

It might seem strange to compare Flash and HTML5 at all, since they are so inherently different. Whereas Flash is proprietary, HTML5 is continually developing through open source collaboration. If Flash is a seasoned monarchy, then HTML5 is the wild wild west. It’s important to note that there are tons of applications and sites in which Flash and native apps will remain the preferred choice of implementation. However, that doesn’t mean that we can’t explore the major differences between the two in order to discuss the gaps that HTML5 can fill where Flash is lacking.

Flash, by nature, is a control freak. It demands browsers have the latest plugin, or it will be sure to let you know if it’s unhappy with your version – perhaps even go on strike until you upgrade. It thrives on presenting a consistent, desktop-centric experience of typefaces and layout, and never bothers to worry about changing the user experience based on device nor the context of what you might want to do on that device. But Flash has had years to evolve from the land of bouncy ball demos and splash screens to the product for creating some fantastically innovative interfaces.

By contrast, HTML5 excels at giving users a delightfully inconsistent experience on any device through the concepts of “graceful degradation” and “progressive enhancement.” Both concepts are designed to provide users the best possible experience each browser allows for, whether a content area displays a static image in Internet Explorer 6, or a fully functional HTML5 video in Chrome. Since desktop browser usage runs the entire spectrum of worst- to best-case scenarios, this way of designing user experiences can help ensure that all users get the most bang for their buck out of their browsers. Gone are the days of being forced into creating identical experiences based on the best performance of the worst browser.

Those who advocate web standards also support the important role HTML5 plays in responsive web design, or the systematic display of content, tasks, and layout, depending on whether the user is viewing the site on a mobile or desktop-sized browser. The reasons why people view the same website on a mobile device versus a desktop is often very different. For example, a user viewing a site for a restaurant while sitting at their office desk could likely want to view a workflow more supportive of exploring the menu, reviews and other content that would help decide if it’s a good place to eat. On the other hand, a user viewing the site from the passenger seat of a car might want to quickly find content based on the assumption that they have already decided to eat there, such as directions or the phone number. Seguir leyendo “What the Demise of Flash Means for the User Experience”

5 Signs of a Great User Experience


If you’ve used the mobile social network Path recently, it’s likely that you enjoyed the experience. Path has a sophisticated design, yet it’s easy to use. It sports an attractive red color scheme and the navigation is smooth as silk. It’s a social app and finding friends is easy thanks to Path’s suggestions and its connection to Facebook.

In short, Path has a great user experience. That isn’t the deciding factor on whether a tech product takes off. Ultimately it comes down to how many people use it and that’s particularly important for a social app like Path. Indeed it’s where Path may yet fail, but the point is they have given themselves a chance by creating a great user experience. In this post, we outline 5 signs that the tech product or app you’re using has a great UX – and therefore has a shot at being the Next Big Thing. Seguir leyendo “5 Signs of a Great User Experience”

Business Objectives vs. User Experience

Here’s a question for you: would you agree that creating a great user experience should be the primary aim of any Web designer? I know what your answer is… and youʼre wrong!

Okay, I admit that not all of you would have answered yes, but most probably did. Somehow, the majority of Web designers have come to believe that creating a great user experience is an end in itself. I think we are deceiving ourselves and doing a disservice to our clients at the same time.

The truth is that business objectives should trump users’ needs every time. Generating a return on investment is more important for a website than keeping users happy. Sounds horrendous, doesn’t it? Before you flame me in the comments, hear me out. Seguir leyendo “Business Objectives vs. User Experience”


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