How journalists are using Facebook, Twitter to write mini serial narratives

Roy Peter Clark by Roy Peter Clark Published

Since the mid 1990s I’ve been experimenting with serial narratives, stories of more than one serving, in which parts or episodes often end in cliffhangers, driving the reader or viewer to the next installment. Serial stories dominate American culture and are expressed in television stories such as “Glee” or “The Sopranos”; in book publishing with the Harry Potter series or “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” trilogy; in reality television (in which someone is always thrown off the island, or given a rose, or breaks the scale, or becomes the weakest link).

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While newspapers have moved away, to some extent, from multi-part serial narratives, there are signs of mini-serialization everywhere: in the cartoon strips and panels that let us visit our favorite characters each morning; in the racehorse coverage of local and national elections; in recurring news stories about Chilean miners trapped in a mine, or a British Petroleum well polluting the Gulf of Mexico. Seguir leyendo “How journalists are using Facebook, Twitter to write mini serial narratives”