Leaders’ social values drive staff loyalty, study finds


Warren Buffett is known for his interest in social values.
Warren Buffett is known for his interest in social values.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Chinese study finds employees are happier, and more likely to stay at a company, if their leaders clearly indicate social values
  • Employee loyalty related to whether a leader’s personal social values matched his or her outward statements
  • But middle management pick up quickly if there’s dissonance between what a CEO says and does
  • And “it’s a given” that business leaders should “know how to make money”

(CNN) — New research shows that managers can benefit from bringing values into the workplace, as long as they do it right.

A study of CEOs and their middle management in China found that employees were happier, and more likely to stay at a company, if their leaders clearly indicated social values — but also followed through in their private actions.

The study of CEOs and their underlings’ happiness was carried out by W. P. Carey School of Business Management Professor Anne S. Tsui, Ping Ping Fu of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Jun Liu of Renmin University of China, and Lan Li of Chinese Entrepreneur Survey System.

Over the course of five years, Tsui and her collaborators studied CEOs and their subordinates at 42 companies in China. They asked both groups about the CEOs’ perceived values, and measured middle managers’ commitment to the company or likelihood of jumping ship.

They found that employee loyalty related to whether a leader’s personal social values matched his or her outward statements.

Tsui said that because corporate leaders communicate their values through every-day actions, typically middle managers can’t help but pick up on their bosses’ values. Seguir leyendo “Leaders’ social values drive staff loyalty, study finds”

Bloggers detained … but others write on



(CNN)
— Across the world blogging has become a way of spreading your message but for some that message can cost them their freedom.

From Iran to Vietnam, bloggers take risks going online to spread news and views authorities have no wish to see or hear.

In Egypt, Wael Abbas is an award wining blogger and international human rights activist recognized for his work by institutions such as the Human Rights Watch and Reporters without Borders.

His blog Misr Digital which translates as “Egyptian Awareness” gained worldwide attention for video posts of torture sessions in prisons, mass sexual harassment of women, and police brutality in the streets of Egypt.

“In oppressive regimes you get both sides of the story from bloggers, who can tackle taboo issues such as torture, homosexuality, and corruption. Bloggers are a necessity in countries where media is not free; they are the main source of free information,” Abbas said.

We refused to let them destroy us
–Wael Abbas
Seguir leyendo “Bloggers detained … but others write on”

Most Americans still don’t have smartphones


Forrester Research reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.
Forrester Research reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone, a Forrester study finds
  • Less than a fourth of cell phone users in Gen X and Gen Y own a smartphone, study says
  • Study indicates social networking is one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions
  • But smartphones have spurred considerable growth in, and demand for, mobile services
RELATED TOPICS

Editor’s note: Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

(CNN) — If you’re a tech news junkie (and that’s why you’re reading CNN.com Tech, right?), you might have gotten the impression that everyone already has — or at least wants — a smartphone. Or that smartphones and tablets are the only mobile devices that matter.

But new research from Forrester indicates that while cell phone penetration is high across all U.S. demographics (82 percent of consumers own a cell phone, and 73 percent report that cell phones are their “most used device”), only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone.

This is true even among the most digitally savvy generations: Gen X (roughly ages 31-40) and Gen Y (roughly ages 18-30).

According to Forrester, Gen Yers and Gen Xers are most likely to own smartphones. However, less than one-fourth of cell phone users in both of those age groups own a smartphone.

Also, Forrester reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.

All of which means that the vast majority (more than 75 percent) of the “digital native” generations does not use smartphones. Instead, they rely on cheaper, simpler-feature phones and limited access to mobile data-supported services.

Of course, feature phones are getting smarter. Many of the the most popular feature phones can do a lot beyond voice calls — from text and multimedia messaging to e-mail, to social media, to web browsing, to even running simple apps based on JavaME.

Granted, feature phones generally offer a more difficult and limited digital experience (especially for web browsing). But that doesn’t stop people from using feature phones in sophisticated ways.

In fact, according to Forrester’s figures, just under half of all U.S. mobile owners have internet access from their cell phone. So, since only 17 percent of U.S. cell users have a smartphone, this means that the vast majority of Americans who are able access the mobile internet use feature phones.

But being able to do something is not the same as actually doing it. Just under a quarter of U.S. mobile owners report going online from their phones.

The simplest mobile activities remain the most popular across all types of cell phones. Topping Forrester’s list is SMS text messaging, which nearly 60 percent of all U.S. mobile owners use.

Despite the booming popularity of social networks like Facebook and Twitter, Forrester found that social networking services are one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions: Only 14 percent of U.S. mobile users access such services from their phones.

In this report, Forrester seems to be trying to spin its findings to make smartphones sound like the most important current mobile trend. For instance, the report says, “Gen Yers and Gen Xers are the most likely to have smartphones and unlimited data plans, providing the tools needed to lead in mobile Internet adoption” — despite the fact that they’re describing the behavior of a minority in that age range. Seguir leyendo “Most Americans still don’t have smartphones”